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Jane Eyre - Nature

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on 17 September 2015

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Transcript of Jane Eyre - Nature

Chestnut Tree
Winter
Spring
“But the privations, or rather the hardships, of Lowood lessened. Spring drew on: she was indeed already come; the frosts of winter had ceased; its snows were melted, its cutting winds ameliorated. My wretched feet, flayed and swollen to lameness by the sharp air of January, began to heal and subside under the gentler breathings of April” (140).
transitional time period
Fall
“...but I found no pleasure in the silent trees, the falling fir-cones, the congealed relics of autumn, russet leaves, swept by past winds in heaps, and now stiffened together. I leaned against a gate, and looked into an empty field where no sheep were feeding, where the short grass was nipped and blanched. It was a very grey day; a most opaque sky, ‘onding on snaw,’ canopied all; thence flakes felt it intervals, which settled on the hard path and on the hoary lea without melting. I stood, a wretched child enough, whispering to myself over and over again, ‘What shall I do?—what shall I do?’” (Chapter 4)
"...the cold winter had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further out-door exercise was now out of the question." (Chapter I)
Nature in Jane Eyre
By: Karen Yang
Michelle Cui
Hannah Kwon

Summer
“...the trees blew steadfastly one way, never writhing round, and scarcely tossing back their boughs once in an hour; so continuous was the strain bending their branchy heads northward--the clouds drifted from pole to pole, fast following, mass on mass: no glimpse of blue sky had been visible that July day.” (Chapter 25)
“...a brilliant June morning had succeeded into the tempest of the night; and to feel, through the open glass door, the breathing of a fresh and fragrant breeze. Nature must be gladsome when I was so happy.” (Chapter 24)
Moon
"It gazed and gazed on me. It spoke to my spirit... it whispered in my heart - ‘My daughter, flee temptation.’ ‘Mother, I will’” (610).
Permanent mother figure
Juxtaposition to Miss Temple
"... her disk was blood- red and half overcast; she seemed to throw on me one bewildered, dreary glance, and buried herself again instantly in the deep drift of cloud” (527).
Foreshadowing the future
Sun
Animals
A Hyena in the Attic
“...when I awoke it was broad day. The chamber looked such a bright little place to me as the sun shone in between the gay blue chintz window curtains, showing papered walls and a carpeted floor, so unlike the bare planks and stained plaster of Lowood, that my spirits rose at the view. Externals have a great effect on the young: I thought that a fairer era of life was beginning for me, one that was to have its flowers and pleasures, as well as its thorns and toils” (184).
contrast/juxtaposition
“That afternoon lapsed in peace and harmony; and in the evening Bessie told me some of her most enchaining stories, and sang me some of her sweetest songs. Even for me life had its gleams of sunshine” (70).
“I suppose you are a stranger in these parts, or you would have heard what happened last autumn,—Thornfield Hall is quite a ruin: it was burnt down just about harvest-time.” (Chapter 36)
“And what ailed the chestnut tree? it writhed and groaned; while wind roared in the laurel walk, and came sweeping over us.” (Chapter XXIII)
“The cloven halves were not broken from each other, for the firm base and strong roots kept them unsundered below; though community of vitality was destroyed—the sap could flow no more: their great boughs on each side were dead, and next winter’s tempests would be sure to fell one or both to earth: as yet, however, they might be said to form one tree—a ruin, but an entire ruin.” (Chapter XXV)
“‘You did right to hold fast to each other,” I said: as if the monster-splinters were living things, and could hear me. “I think, scathed as you look, and charred and scorched, there must be a little sense of life in you yet: rising out of that adhesion at the faithful, honest roots: you will never have green leaves more--never more see birds making nests and singing idylls in your boughs; the time of pleasure and love is over with you: but you are not desolate: each of you has a comrade to sympathise with him in his decay.”’ (Chapter XXV)
"The kitchen, the butler’s pantry, the servants’ hall, the entrance hall, were equally alive; and the saloons were only left void and still when the blue sky and halcyon sunshine of the genial spring weather called their occupants out into the grounds. Even when that weather was broken, and continuous rain set in for some days, no damp seemed cast over enjoyment: indoor amusements only became more lively and varied, in consequence of the stop put to outdoor gaiety" (344).
"October, November, December passed away. One afternoon in January, Mrs. Fairfax had begged a holiday for Adele, because she had a cold; and, as Adele seconded the request with an ardour that reminded me how precious occasional holidays had been to me in my own childhood, I accorded it, deeming that I did well in showing pliability on the point. It was a fine, calm day, though very cold; I was tired of sitting still in the library through a whole long morning: Mrs. Fairfax had just written a letter which was waiting to be posted, so I put on my bonnet and cloak and volunteered to carry it to Hay; the distance, two miles, would be a pleasant winter afternoon walk." (209)
"...I studied the aspect of that winter afternoon. Afar, it offered a pale blank of mist and cloud; near, a scene of wet lawn and storm-beat shrub, with ceaseless rain sweeping away wildly before a long and lamentable blast." (Chapter 1)
tranquil desires are out of reach
"A change had taken place in the weather the preceding evening, and a keen north-east wind, whistling through the crevices of our bedroom windows all night long, had made us shiver in our beds, and turned the contents of the ewers to ice." (Chapter 6)
beginnings of an icy heart
Rain & Wind
"The wind roared high in the great trees which embowered the gates; but the road as far as I could see, to the right hand and the left, was all still and solitary..." (Chapter XXV)
"...the beclouded afternoon was tending to drear twilight. I heard the rain still beating continuously on the staircase window, and the wind howling in the grove behind the hall..." (Chapter 2)
Bewick's History of British Birds
hyenic scenes: Jane lashes out at Mrs. Reeds, Rochester's first appearance
Gytrash, a Yorkshire myth
“A rude noise broke on these fine ripplings and whisperings, at once so far away and so clear: a positive tramp, tramp, a metallic clatter...” (211)
Bewell, Alan. "Hyena trouble." Studies in Romanticism 53.3 (2014): 369+. Student Resources in Context. Web. 16 Sept. 2015.
Animals live freely from confines of social law. In essence, they define the uncivilized.
Bertha, the nocturnal beast
“What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at first sight, tell..." (559)
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