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The Respiratory System

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by

Linny Boo

on 12 June 2014

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Transcript of The Respiratory System

The Respiratory System
Function
The function of the respiratory system is to supply blood cells with oxygen to deliver to all parts of the body. When you breathe in, you inhale oxygen and when you breathe out, you exhale carbon dioxide.

The blood that is coming in is
blue
because that is blood without oxygen.  Gas 1 is where the blood enters the alveoli.  In gas 2 blood is leaving the alveoli.  The blood in gas 2 is
red
because now there is oxygen in it.
How it All Works
Main Structures
After the respiratory system has provided fuel (oxygen) for the blood cells, the
circulatory
system transports the cells to other parts of the body. Also, the depleted air is exchanged in the alveoli and carbon dioxide is exhaled.
Relationships To Circulatory System
Bibliography
"Alveoli." Untitled Document. Johns Hopkins University, n.d. Web. 7 Jun. 2014. <http://oac.med.jhmi.edu/res_phys/Encyclopedia/Alveoli/Alveoli.HTML>.

"Asthma: MedlinePlus." National Library of Medicine - National Institutes of Health. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Jun. 2014. . <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/asthma.html>.

"Lung Cancer: MedlinePlus." National Library of Medicine - National Institutes of Health. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Jun. 2014. . <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/lungcancer.html>. •

"Lung Diseases: MedlinePlus." National Library of Medicine - National Institutes of Health. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Jun. 2014. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/lungdiseases.html>. •

"Pneumonia: MedlinePlus." National Library of Medicine - National Institutes of Health. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Jun. 2014. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/pneumonia.html>. •

"Respiratory - Amazing Facts." District_Homepage_Index. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Jun. 2014. <http://warriors.warren.k12.il.us/dburke/amazingfactsrespiratory.htm>. •

"Respiratory System: Oxygen Delivery System." The Franklin Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 Jun. 2014. . <www.fi.edu/learn/heart/systems/respiration.html>. •

"Respiratory disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Jun. 2014. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Respiratory_disease>. •

"Respiratory system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Jun. 2014. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Respiratory
Cellular respiration is the process when organisms obtain energy from organic molecules and cells produce the fuel they need to survive. It occurs constantly and is vital to an organism's survival. Usually, the 2 key ingredients to successfully perform this process are glucose and oxygen. This occurs in the cells and tissues and often occurs a swapping of carbon dioxide and oxygen that takes place in the lungs of the organism. Through this process, an organism is able to gain useful energy and release waste.
cellular respiration
thEnd
(c) 2014 by Linda Bao
Made In Canada All Rights Reserved
Lungs
Air enters through the nose where it is filtered, warmed and moistened. Little hairs called cilia line the nostrils and filters put dust particles bacteria.
Because air can enter and exit through both the nose and mouth, the pharynx is where the 2 tubes meet up
Epiglottis
The epiglottis is an important tissue in the respiratory system. The epiglottis is a flap of tissue that is made of elastic cartilage at the base of the tongue. It prevents food and drinks from falling down the airway which results in choking. It closes the top of the trachea when we swallow so the food doesn't go down the wrong way.
The trachea is a long tube that is approximately 10 cm long and 2.5 cm in diameter. The trachea allows oxygen to pass through it. The air goes through the larynx to the trachea. The trachea then connects to the bronchi. Without the trachea, oxygen will never reach the lungs.
The bronchi are two air tubes which branch off the trachea and carry air directly to the lungs. They convey air to and from the lungs.
The function of the lungs is to deliver oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from your blood. Air is forced in and out of your lungs by movements of your diaphragm and other breathing muscles.
The bronchi divides into smaller tubes called bronchioles, which end in tiny air sacs called alveoli.
The diaphragm helps pump carbon dioxide out of the lungs and pull oxygen into the lungs. The diaphragm is a sheet of muscle that lies across the bottom of the chest cavity.
Alveoli are surrounded by capillaries. The alveoli's basic function is gas exchange. They let oxygen pass through into the blood. There are approximately 300 million alveoli in the average adult lung. Without these our blood would have no oxygen. Without oxygen we would be dead.
Alveoli
When we breathe through our mouth or nose, the air ends up going through our trachea to the lungs. There, the air expands into the bronchi and eventually the alveoli where carbon dioxide in transferred into these air sacs and exhaled out of the body. While carbon dioxide is swapped out of the blood cells, oxygen is swapped in and moves along to the circulatory system
For example, in a plant, cellular respiration occurs in the mitochondria and ATP (primary source of energy) is produced continuously.
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