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Latin: Forms of a noun.

Teaches three of the six forms a noun can take in Latin: Nominative, Accusative and Dative.
by

Oscar Tovey-Garcia

on 18 May 2012

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Transcript of Latin: Forms of a noun.

Latin Noun
Forms Conclusion In Latin, nouns are separated into 3 different Declensions.
In addition, each noun can be in any of the six Latin Forms. In this tutorial we will only learn about three: Nominative, Accusative, and Dative. In Latin, each noun is classified into three different declensions. Each declension has different endings. Examples of words in different declensions:

1st Declension: puella (girl)
2nd Declension: servus (slave)
3rd Declension: ? Introduction Declensions Forms: Nominative Remember that, or I'll get you. The first form we are going to learn about is the Nominative form. It indicates that the noun is doing something. Here is a model to show how different declensions end in the Nominative form:

1st Declension: puella (girl)
2nd Declension: servus (slave)
3rd Declension: ?

(Endings are highlighted in red) Forms: Accusative The second form we are going to learn about is the Accusative form. It indicates that something is being done to the noun. Here is a model to show how different declensions end in the Accusative form:

1st Declension: puellam (girl)
2nd Declension: servum (slave)
3rd Declension: mercatorem (merchant) The third (and last in this tutorial) form we are going to learn about is the Dative form. It indicates that something is being done to/for the noun, e.g, 'The man gave the toga to the boy.' or 'The man made the toga for the boy.' Here is a model to show how different declensions end in the Dative form:

1st Declension: puellae (to/for the girl).
2nd Declension: servo (to/for the slave).
3rd Declension: mercatori (to/for the slave). Forms: Dative Note that in the previous page, the Nominative form was used to show declensions. Normally you work out which declension a noun is in by looking at the nominative singular ending. That is why the nominative form for the 3rd Declension is marked ?; there are many nouns in the 3rd declension which have a different ending in the nominative, e.g, mercator (merchant) and leo (lion). These are both in 3rd declension and in the nominative form. There are many more examples of this, including some names (like Grumio, or Syphax. [Note that the name Caecilius is in the 2nd Declension, as it ends in -us in the Nominative form])) In the other forms though, nouns in the 3rd declension follow a pattern, just like the other declensions. Note that the accusative form (in singular) always ends in -m, whatever declension the noun is in. Though in plural, the accusative form does NOT end in -m. Note that all other nouns which are not in the 1st or 2nd Declensions are in the third declension. So far we have only looked at the singular for each noun. Now we are going to learn the plural for each form and declension. Plural 1st Declension 2nd Declension 3rd Declension Singular Plural Nominative Accusative Dative Nominative Accusative Dative puella puellam puellae servus ? servum servo mercatorem mercatori puellae puellas puellis servi servos servis mercatores mercatores mercatoribus You may have noticed that puellae (Dative singular) and puellae (Nominative plural) are the same. So are mercatores (Nominative plural) and mercatores (Accusative plural). Latin nouns are quite complex, but you'll soon get the hang of them! Remember that, or I'll get you!
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