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George Milton Character Analysis Project

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by

Amy Johnson

on 13 November 2013

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Transcript of George Milton Character Analysis Project

George Milton Character Analysis Project
Quote #4
"And it'd be our own, an' nobody could can us. If we don't like a guy we can say, 'Get the hell out,' and by God he's got to do it. An' if a fren' come along, why we'd have an extra bunk, an' we'd say, 'Why don't you spen' the night?' An' by God he would." -George Milton
"Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don't belong no place. They come to a ranch an' work up a stake and then they go inta town and blow their stake, and the first thing you know they're poundin' their tail on some other ranch. They ain't got nothing to look ahead to."
-George Milton
Quote #7
"For two bits I'd shove out of here. If we can get jus' a few dollars in the poke we'll shove off and go up the American River and pan gold. We can make maybe a couple of dollars a day there, and we might hit a pocket." -George Milton
Quote #8
"…If I was bright, if I was even a little bit smart, I'd have my own little place, an' I'd be bringin' in my own crops, 'stead of doin' all the work and not getting what comes up outa the ground." -George Milton
Quote #9
"S'pose they was a carnival or a circus come to town, or a ball game, or any damn thing. We'd just go to her, we wouldn't ask nobody if we could. Jus' say, we'll go to her, an' we would. Jus' milk the cow and sling some grain to the chickens an' go to her." -George Milton
Quote #5
"For two bits I'd shove out of here. If we can get jus' a few dollars in the poke we'll shove off and go up the American River and pan gold. We can make maybe a couple of dollars a day there, and we might hit a pocket." -George Milton
Quote #3
About George Milton
George Milton is a roving farmworker who is "small and quick, dark of face, with restless eyes and sharp, strong features." There's more to him than a smart mouth and quick brain: he may not show it much, but George is a deeply moral, good man.
Quote #1
"Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don't belong no place. They come to a ranch an' work up a stake and then they go inta town and blow their stake, and the first thing you know they're poundin' their tail on some other ranch. They ain't got nothing to look ahead to." -George Milton
The author seems to be stating that loneliness is even worse than poverty. Like Lennie and George, you can bear a lot more if you have a friend.
"I seen the guys that go around on the ranches alone. That ain't no good. They don't have no fun. After a long time they get mean. They get wantin' to fight all the time." -George Milton
Quote #2
Ranchers have been alone for so long that they're
desperate to make connections, even violent ones.
Quote #6
"Lennie—if you jus' happen to get in trouble like you always done before, I want you to come right here an' hide in the brush… Hide in the brush till I come for you." -George Milton
George might have fantasies of panning for gold, but he's a realist. The freedom to starve while chasing a fool's dream is not the kind of freedom he wants.
For Lennie and George, a key part of the dream farm is the freedom to let their friends stay with them.
When George is starting to believe the farm might happen, he's most overwhelmed by the idea that they could do anything they wanted whenever they wanted
It seems that George doesn' have much sense of justice. He knows Lennie doesn't mean any harm, but its the fact that he
does
harm mice and terrifies women.

This obviously isn't the American dream: a bunch of lonely farmers that the main character describes as having no family or hope.
A Grade A American Dream that George fantasizes about is heading out West to pan for gold. The only problem is it's only ever happened to a handful of people.
George thinks if he was smarter he could achieve the American Dream of having his own place. From what we see it has nothing to do with being smart.
"All kin's a vegetables in the garden, and if we want a little whisky we can sell a few eggs or something, or some milk. We'd jus' live there. We'd belong there. There wouldn't be no more runnin' round the country and gettin' fed by a Jap cook. No, sir, we'd have our own place where we belonged and not sleep in no bunk house." -George Milton
Quote #10
George and Lennie's version of the American Dream includes some sort of male dominance, no girls allowed.
By: Amy Johnson
Block 2
11-13-13
Full transcript