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Constructivist Learning Theory

Brief overview on construcivism
by

Jennifer Paul

on 11 June 2013

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Transcript of Constructivist Learning Theory

Pre-Assessment
Constructivist
l
History
Learning Theory: Constructivism
Activity
Let's work
together

Sweet!
Materials: Tape and construction paper strips in 4 colors (blue, yellow, green, red)

Instructions:

you are not allowed to ask questions

In a group of 3 and 4 people constuct a chain so that you have 4 links of each color.
"Education, therefore, is a process of living and not a preparation for future living"

John Dewey
Materials:
Construction paper strips in four colors
Blue - Constructivism
Red - Collaborative
Yellow - Hands On
Green - Scaffolding
paper clips
Instructions:
Make a one complete chain that includes four (4) links in every color; 4 blue, 4 red, 4 green and 4 yellow
You cannot ask the facilitators any questions
Open
Envelope.
Make 10 groups of 3 to 4 people
David & Roger
Johnson
Lev Vygotsky
John Dewey
Constructivist
Is the following statement True or False:

When applying a constructivist approach the teacher should not tell students anything directly, rather they should allow the student to construct knowledge for themselves.
Collaborative
Hands On
Scaffolding
Russian Psychologist
1896-1934
most intrigued with developmental psychology
Coined the concept of the Zone of Proximal Development,
acquisition of new knowledge is dependent on previous learning,
New learning is dependent on things learned in the past, a
Learning is universal,
The best learning happens when “internalized” by language and culture
Lev Vygotsky
Discussion
Constructivism
Summary
Constructivist Instructional
Strategies
Hands on /experimental
Collaborative
Scaffolding
American education and philosopher
Democracy and Education (1916)
Logic (1938)
Students allowed to think and articulate for themselves
An active learning environment filled with experience.
Students learn by pulling information from meaningful experiences
Assessment of knowledge better determined by creativity and collaboration than traditional assessments
“Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of imagination”
The Quest for Certainty: A Study of the Relation of Knowledge and Action
John Dewey
In class labs
Project Models
Partner Activities
Based on students actively participating in their learning
Students take that first active step.
Student-centered
Teacher acts as a facilitator
Collaborative
Class discussion
Group activities
Think Pair/share
“learners construct knowledge for themselves---each learner individually (and socially) constructs meaning---as he or she learns”
Scaffolding
Sequential learning
Modeling a task
Give advise
Summary
Questions?
Post Assessement
Carvin, A. (n.d.). Exploring technology and school reform: John Dewey and Lev Vygotsky. Retrieved from
http://www.edwebproject.org/constructivism.dewey.html

Danielson. C. (2007). Enhancing professional practice: A framework for teaching (2nd ed.) Alexandria,
VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Educational Broadcasting Corporation. (2004). What is the history of constructivism, and how has it
changed over time? Retrieved from http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/constructivism/index_sub4.html

Hein, G.E.(1991). Constructivist Learning Theory. Retrieved from
http://www.exploratorium.edu/ifi/resources/constructivistlearning.html

Holt, L. C., Kysilka, M. (2006). Instructional Patterns: Strategies for Maximizing Student Learning.
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Lam, F and Norman, A. (2011). The socratic method as an approach to learning and Its benefits. Thesis.
Retrieved from http://repository.cmu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1126&context=hsshonors

Marzano, R.J. (2007). The art and science of teaching: A comprehensive framework for effective
instructions (1st ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and curriculum Development.

OTEC (2000). Learning Theories and Transfer of Learning. Retrieve from
http://otec.uoregon.edu/learning_theory.htm

PBS Online. (2000). Only a teacher schoolhouse pioneers: John Dewy. Retrieved from
http://www.pbs.org/onlyateacher/john.html

Warrick, W. (2005).Constructivism: pre-historical to post-modern. Retrieved from
http://mason.gmu.edu/~wwarrick/Portfolio/Products/constructivism.htm
History
Stems from Cognitive psychology
Dewey
Vygotsky
Piaget
Not universally accepected, but is now recognized by cognitive psychologists as providing the most powerful framework for understanding how children learn.
1960
Learning is an active process
Learners construct new ideas or concepts based on their current and past knowledge
Constructivism
Learning by making sense of the world based on information gained from interacting with the environment

Allows students to discover concepts, principles, laws, and ideas by themselves
Jerome Bruner
Teacher's Perspective
Self- knowledge

Subject-Matter
Knowledge

Knowledge of Students

Knowledge of Learning Theories
students work with their peers to accomplish a shared or common goal
requires teachers to structure cooperative interdependence among the students.
5 Components of Cooperative Learning:
Positive interdependence
Individual accountability
Promote interaction
Social Skills
Group Processing
Roger & David W. Johnson
Cooperative Learning: A specific kind of collaborative learning
Socrates (469 BCE- 399 BCE)
Socratic Method
Prior knowledge based questioning
Developed Critical thinking
Scientific inquiry used to test hypotheses and propositions
Beneficial for testing misconceptions
Sophists (5th century BCE)
Knowledge acquired through lecturing and modeling
Giambattista Vico
Coined the term “constructivist”
Treatise published 1710
Jean Piaget
Arguably considered the original constructivist.
Theory of knowledge 1954
The child is a “lone scientist”
Roots in cognitive psychology and biology
Group B:
Johanne Casseus
Natalie Krops
Danisha Love
Jennifer Paul
What is Constructivism?
References
Group A:
In your own words describe what you understand about constructivist theory and how you might apply this in your classroom.
Collaborative
Hands-on/experimental
Scaffolding
Constructivism
Piaget
Bruner
Socrates
Dewey
Vygotsky
Johnson
Inquiry
Modeling
Experiment
Discussion
Group Activities
Encourages
autonomy
mutual respect for peers and teachers
dialogue between peers and teachers
Challenges students
Engages curiosity
Student driven and inquiry based
TeacherS
ask thoughtful and open ended questions
practice “wait-time”
Definition:

Constructivist learning is based on students' active participation in problem-solving and critical thinking regarding a learning activity which they find relevant and engaging. They are "constructing" their own knowledge by testing ideas and approaches based on their prior knowledge and experience, applying these to a new situation, and integrating the new knowledge gained with pre-existing intellectual constructs

From Oregon Technology in Education Council
http://otec.uoregon.edu/learning_theory.htm
Constructivism:
Fahima Jahan
Clavdia Civil
Cassie Burke
Emily Ruping
Full transcript