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Folklore Investigation: Greek Mythology

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Kevin Merigala

on 28 March 2014

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Transcript of Folklore Investigation: Greek Mythology

Pandora's Box
Pandora was given a box by her husband Epimetheus. This box contained all the evils in the world, and hope. She opened the box and all the evil was released.
Pandora's Box reflects the Greeks' opinion on how the world's evils came to be. It also explains their views relating to the creation of mankind and its characteristics.
The Purpose of Greek Myths
The Greeks used legends and myths to explain nature and historical events. They used myths to teach lessons about mankind and their stories often reflected their beliefs and values.
King Midas
The story of King Midas is one for the ages. The wine god Dionysus decided to give King Midas anything he wanted for being helpful to one of his companions. He wished that everything he touched would be turned to gold. His wish came true, and instead of a blessing, it became a curse.
Why this is important
This story gives a hint to the kind of traits the Greeks valued, or in this case, did not value. These Greeks apparently didn't admire greed as shown by King Midas.
The Fall of Icarus
Daedalus and his son Icarus were trapped in the prisons of Crete. To escape, Daedalus built wings of feathers and wax. As they flew away, Daedalus warned Icarus not to fly close to the sun. Icarus kept trying to fly higher, against his father's wishes. The wax on his wings melted and he fell to his death.
Why this is Important?
This story is important because it shows more about the Greeks' beliefs. Through Icarus's death, the Greeks warned against too much ambition.
Orpheus and Eurydice
Orpheus falls in love with a woman named Eurydice. When a herdsman tries to advance on Eurydice, she runs and is bit by a snake. Eurydice is resurrected by the singing of Orpheus on one condition: he could not look at her. All he had to do was lead her safely out of the underworld. However, to make sure she was following he looked back, and she had to stay in the underworld.
The Greek Culture, Investigative Folklore
Why This Represents Greek Culture
This story shows how the Greeks valued trust. It also tells people about the Greeks' ideas on a tricky subject: death. According to this story, people did go somewhere after death, and it was possible to come back.
THANK
YOU
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