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New Holocaust Sample

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Chris Bancells

on 23 May 2013

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Transcript of New Holocaust Sample

My New Holocaust Story Early Life/Pre-War During the War, Part 1 During the War, Part 2 After the War I was born in Rochester, NY on March 15th, 2003. My father's name was Micheal. He was an American businessman in Rochester, and my mother, Lelya, was born in Iraq. My mother moved to the United States to escape the war and met my father through a mutual friend. I was a typical American boy who loved playing soccer and fishing with my dad. I was an average student, but had an interest in science from a young age. I was in 5th grade when the war began. When the army invaded, I was forced to leave school almost immediately. My mother was taken away to a camp "for her own protection" they said. I never saw her again, and still do not know what happened to her. Since my father knew many important people in the business world, the military wanted him to give names of people in the resistance. He claimed not to know anyone, even though I knew he was lying. Eventually, we were both released from the prison where they held us, and we were given ID cards. We had to move into a small apartment with my Uncle and cousins. After a year or so, my cousins and I were able to go to school again, but we all had to wear yellow badges shaped like a crescent moon. They made us wear them because we were of Middle Eastern descent. It didn't matter to them that we were Christians and not Muslim. One day soldiers came to our apartment and threatened my father and uncle. The soldiers said they would take me and my cousins away if we didn't tell them where the Resistance met in our neighborhood. That night, a group of people, I never knew who they were, came and took us to the train station. My father said we were going to Detroit. When we got to Detroit, we were met by Resistance soldiers who gave us a new place to live. Detroit was a "safe city" and we were able to stay there until the war ended. When the new government was established, I tried to get in touch with my old friends from Rochester. I searched for 7 different people, but was only ever able to find 1: David. His father was an engineer for the government. Eventually, I went to college and became a lawyer. John Doe photo by Martin Addison, via Wikimedia Commons
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