Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Dover Beach By: Matthew Arnold

No description
by

Melinda Mitterhauser

on 5 March 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Dover Beach By: Matthew Arnold

Critical Theory
Structuralism
- " moon-blanched land " (l.8) refers to the moon reflecting off the water
- "grating roar" - (l. 9) - and harsh unpleasant sound
- " tremulous cadence slow, " (l.13) speaks of a sad slow music like rhythm of the the waves beating against the shore.
Influences
Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888)
Poem Published in 1867
Darwin& Lamarck-Evolution
Setting
sea
moonlight (beautiful)
night time
high tide
calm waters
Taaa Daaa
Ann & Alyssa
Discussion Questions!
Dover Beach
By: Matthew Arnold
Word Choice & Figurative Language
Imagery: " the tide is full the moon lies fair" (l.2)
" glimmering and vast " (l. 5)
" pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling" (l. 10)
" ignorant armies clash by night" (l.37)

Analyzed by :
Ann Hanna, Alyssa Willms, Melinda Mitterhauser & Becki Persoon


The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth’s shore
Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled.
But now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear
And naked shingles of the world.

Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.
Tone & Mood
The sea is calm tonight.
The tide is full, the moon lies fair
Upon the straits; on the French coast the light
Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand,
Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.
Come to the window, sweet is the night-air!
Only, from the long line of spray
Where the sea meets the moon-blanched land,
Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up the high strand,
Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal note of sadness in.

Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the Agean, and it brought
Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
Of human misery; we
Find also in the sound a thought,
Hearing it by this distant northern sea.

The End
Thank you
La Fin
It's OVER!!
Das Ende
Th..th..that's all folks
Danke schone
Lines 1&2 "The sea is calm tonight,
The tide is full, the moon lies fair" (Arnold l. 1-2)
Setting Cont.
Line 3
straits
French coast visible
Setting Cont.
lines 4&5
lighthouse
cliffs of England illuminated by moon
can see England=speaker on the coast of England looking at English channel which separates England and France
moon is vast
bay -->tranquil
"Upon the straits; on the French coast" (Arnold, l. 3)
"..the light gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand, glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay." (Arnold, l. 4-5)
Line 6
Indoors
with someone
lack of pollution
"Come to the window, sweet is
the night air!" (Arnold, l. 6)
Characters
narrator
and secret audience
"Come to the window..." (Arnold, l.6)
"Ah, love, let us be true" (Arnold, l.29)
most likely a woman
Mention of ancient Greek tragic writer, Sophocles (line 15)
"Sea of Faith" is personified in line 21 (religious reference?/religion itself?)
Theme
The theme is the fact that there's no beauty in the world anymore. We have polluted the beauty of the sea.

At the beginning of the poem, the poet talks about the beauty he sees on the beach. Then he talks about the sweet smell, and then the sounds on the beach. However, the sounds remind him of Sophocles who heard the same sounds and wrote about them in his tragic poems. This changes the mood for the poet.

He starts becoming troubled about what he was not troubled about earlier: human misery and sadness. This makes him sad too. The sea is not as beautiful as it seemed moments ago.
Plot
The world is not as beautiful as it used to be when people had something to live for.
Begins with poet looking out on the beautiful coast of the English Channel and then the poet is reminded of the tragic writer Sophocles and starts clicking back into reality: this world is not beautiful. Though it used to be.

"The Sea of Faith was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore" (Arnold, l. 21-22)
Poet believes that back when people had a faith or something to believe in, the world was as high as the high tide; as beautiful as the moon. But all he hears now is the roaring and it is depressing him. He questions, no doubt, "WHY HUMANITY WHY?"
Facing the white cliffs of Dover, where Arnold honeymooned in 1851
Time Period
Personal
Location
Religion, society, love, education, career
1. What are your opinions on humanity? Do you think that humanity is too far gone? Or are there recurring patterns from the past seen today? Do you agree with the poet when he says that the past was better?
THE FALL OF HUMANITY
"Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay." (l. 5)
"With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal note of sadness in." (l. 13-14)
"Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
Of human misery; we" (l. 17-18)
"Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night." (l. 36-37)
Peace
Melancholy
Despair
Loss of peace
Writer's tone
Reader's response
Mood of poem
Mournful, melancholy, ominous
Critical, reflective, expressive of his philosophies
Emotion evoking, question raising
"Ah, love, let us be true" (l.29)
Appeal
Works Cited
"The Poem" Critical Guide to Poetry for Students Ed. Philip K. Jason. eNotes.com, Inc. 2002 eNotes.com 1 Mar, 2015 <http://www.enotes.com/topics/dover-beach/in-depth#in-depth-the-poem>
"Dover Beach : Analysis." Dover Beach : Analysis. Web. 1 Mar. 2015. <http://cummingsstudyguides.net/Guides2/Dover.html>.
Touche, Julia. "Arnold's "Dover Beach" : A Commentary." Arnold's "Dover Beach" : A Commentary. 1 June 2000. Web. 1 Mar. 2015. <http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/arnold/touche4.html>.
Matthew Arnold
First stanza implies a very calm relaxed feel about Dover Beach, but the second reveals that although it is calm it isn't necessarily pleasant, it's actually very unpleasant.
- "Sophocles " (l. 15)- wrote ancient Greek tragedies
- "it " - refers to line 14 " the eternal note of sadness"
- "Agean" (l.16) - a sea by modern day Greece
- " turbid ebb and flow of human misery " (l. 17-18) human life goes up and down on this muddy , unclear path.
- " we find ... distant northern sea" ( l. 19) - Sophocles' ideas are transferred all the way from the Agean up to Dover strait through the tide
Third Stanza
This stanza talks about how Sophocles wrote his tragedies based on the melancholy sounding tides which the author relates to.
Fourth stanza
Basically faith and religion used to be so strong and unchallenged. Now the presence of new theories, like the theory of evolution and science, have caused religion to pull back from the front lines . Religion is leaving like the receding ocean and leaving the world bare.
- "Faith" (l. 21) - faith in God and religion
- "bright girdle furled" (l. 23) - a bright sash rolled up and strong.
- "melancholy" (l. 25) - gloomy, somber
- "shingles" - loose stones on the beach
Last stanza
- "Darkling plain" (l. 35) - flat lightless place
- "confused alarms of struggle and flight"
(l.36) - noisy confusion, people running away
- " where ignorant armies clash by night" (l.37)
-refers to the Battle of Epipolae ( greek history ) where they battled through the night, lashing out at each other blindly.
Stanza Structure
"a series of incomplete sonnets"
-Ruth Pitman
This last stanza draws the intention of the poem together. Saying that we are all in this world which seems to be beautiful, but it is actually a dark, battlefield in which everything is chaotic and ugly.
Rhythmical Pattern
It creates two contrasting images.
The first a tranquil, serene, lovely world.
The second a more powerful, more chaotic , dark world.
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Not certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
l. 31-35
Simile: " The Sea of Faith... lay like the folds of a
bright girdle furled " (l. 21- 23) - compares faith to a bright colorful ornate sash
-free style iambic pentameter
Rhyming Scheme
Allusion : " French coast... cliffs of England" (l.3-4)
- refers to the straits of Dover where you can see France from England
- "Sophocles ... Agean " (l.15) - refers to the Greek play writer who wrote tragedies. Agean sea is by Greece
- " Sea of Faith" (l. 21) - refers to religion and faith in a metaphor, relating it to the ocean.
- " ignorant armies clash by night" (l. 37) - refers to the Battle of Epipolae where the armies of Athens and Sicily fought in the dark in a chaotic battle that caused mass carnage.
-free style rhyming
Figurative language
Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help or pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.
"Dover Beach"
A short lyric poem
Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up the high stand,
Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal not of sadness in.
Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up the high stand,
Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal not of sadness in.
l. 9-14
- " to lie before us like a land of dreams" (l. 31) -compares the world to a land of opportunity.
- "and here we are as on a darkling plain " (l. 35) -
compares the humanity to being on a flat lightless, chaotic battle field.
Metaphor: " turbid ebb and flow of human misery " ( l. 17)
- compares murky, muddy, unclear water to human's miserable sad lives.
- "The Sea of Faith" (l. 21) - compares the vast greatness of the ocean to religion and God.
2. In the third stanza, Arnold talks about how the importance of religion has changed in society. Religion used to be THE source of hope. Has that changed, like he suggests? Think of your own experiences.
Figurative language
Kokernot, Walter. "Project MUSE - "Where Ignorant Armies Clash by Night" and the Sikh Rebellion: A Contemporary Source for Matthew Arnold's Night-Battle Imagery." Project MUSE - "Where Ignorant Armies Clash by Night" and the Sikh Rebellion: A Contemporary Source for Matthew Arnold's Night-Battle Imagery. 1 Jan. 2005. Web. 5 Mar. 2015. <http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/vp/summary/v043/43.1kokernot.html>.
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Dover Beach: Stanza 4 Summary." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 5 Mar. 2015. <http://www.shmoop.com/dover-beach/stanza-4-summary.html>.
Full transcript