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Class Division In The 1930's

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Christy martinez

on 26 November 2013

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Transcript of Class Division In The 1930's

Class Division In The South
Guided Question:
What were the different Classes in the South ?
Topic:
Focus Questions:

2.)Did certain classes have more/better privileges?
3.)Why were classes division so prevalent in the south?
4.)What were the class divisions in the south?
5.)What happened to the social class during the great depression?
1.)What are the reasons of social classes in the 1930's?
1.)What are the reasons of social class divisions ?

The reason their was social class division in the 1930s was because of the great depression. The upper class in general still kept most of their wealth. The working middle class became poor, so instead of three types of classes it soon became two. During this time the wealthy flaunted their wealth more than ever, to show that they are still wealthy even though the nation is suffering a economic crisis.
Source:xroads.virginia.edu/-ug02/newyorker/class.html
2.)Did certain classes have more /better privileges?
Yes, certain classes did get better privileges. Since the white people were considered 'higher power' they were the people who got better things such as owning land, better bathrooms and water fountains, and to sit in the front part of a public bus.

2.) Did certain classes have more/better privileges?

Yes, certain classes did get better privileges.Since the white race were considered "higher power" they were the people who got better things such as owning land, better bathrooms, and cleaner water fountains, and the front of the bus was reserved for white's only. And the black race had the total opposite they had to drink dirty water fountains and had to sit in the back of the bus and if there wasn't enough seats in the front someone from the back had to give up their seat.
3.)Why was class division prevalent in the south?

4.)What were the class divisions in the south?

The upper class flaunted their wealth by buying expensive clothes in order to differentiate themselves from others.
Working class: hit hardest by the stock market crash. they lost significant portions of their income to cutbacks.
Women became busier and more productive .The men lost their jobs and took pay cuts in order to survive.
Racial violence increased. especially in the south .lynching incidents quadrupled.
The 1930's were a time of great social change and reformation due to the economic unrest.
The relations between black and white deteriorated.
Out of all groups blacks were hit the hardest. nearly half of them were out of work by 1932.
Source:www.prezi.com

5.)What happened to the social class during the Great Depression?

The main cause for the Great Depression was the combination of the greatly unequal distribution of wealth throughout the 1920's, and the extensive stock market speculation that took place during the latter part that same decade. The distribution of wealth in the 1920's existed on many levels. Money was distributed disparately between the rich and the middle-class, between industry and agriculture within the United States, and between the U.S.. A major reason for this large and growing gap between the rich and the working-class people was the increased manufacturing output throughout this period. From 1923-1929 the average output per worker increased 32% in manufacturing. During that same period of time average wages for manufacturing jobs increased only 8%.
source: www.academic.mu.edu/depression.
Full transcript