Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Intraoral Radiographic I : Bite wing and occlusal view

No description
by

ahmad dzulfikar samsudin

on 7 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Intraoral Radiographic I : Bite wing and occlusal view

Ahmad Dzulfikar Samsudin Intraoral Radiographic I :
Bitewing & Occlusal View Learning Objectives : Why it is called Bitewing? Bitewing radiograph Any Question? Thank You the posterior teeth and the image receptor should be PARALLEL

the beam aiming device should ensure that in the HORIZONTAL plane, the X-ray tubehead is aimed so that the beam meets the teeth and the image receptor at right angles, and passes directly through all the contact areas

in VERTICAL plane, the X-ray tubehead is aimed downwards (approximately 5 - 8 degree to the horizontal) to compensate the curve of Monson

positioning REPRODUCIBLE required the patient to bite on a small wing attached to an intraoral film packet the image receptor should be positioned centrally within the holder with the upper and lower edges of the image receptor parallel to the bite platform

the image receptor should be positioned with its long axis horizontally for a horizontal bitewing or vertically for a vertical bitewing

the posterior teeth and the image receptor should be in contact or as close together as possible Ideal Technique the desired holder is selected together with an appropriate sized image receptor

the patient is positioned with the head supported and with the occlusal plane horizontal

the holder is inserted carefully into the lingual sulcus opposite the posterior teeth Positioning techniques the anterior edge of the image receptor should be positioned opposite the distal aspect of the lower canine - extends just beyond the mesial aspect of the lower third molar

the patient asked to close the teeth firmly onto the bite platform

the X-ray tubehead is aligned accurately using the beam aiming device to achieve optimal horizontal and vertical angulations

the exposure is made simple and straightforward
image receptor is held firmly
position of X-ray tubehead is determined by the beaming device
avoids coning off or cone cutting of the anterior part of the image receptor
holders are autoclavable/disposable Advantages operator dependent, therefore images are not 100% reproducible
can be uncomfortable for the patient
expensive
not suitable for children Disadvantages should have acceptable definition with no distortion or blurring

image should include from the mesial surface of the first premolar to the distal surface of the second molar

the occlusal plane/bite-plateform should be in the middle of the image

the maxillary and mandibular alveolar crests should be shown Ideal quality criteria should be no overlap of the approximal surfaces

should be free from coning off or cone-cutting

image should be comparable with previous bitewing images both geometrically and in density and contrast

the desired density and contrast of film-captured images will depend on the clinical reasons for taking the radiograph detection of lesions of caries

monitoring the progression of dental caries

assessment of existing restorations

assessment of the periodontal status Indications Occlusal Radiography Why is it called Occlusal Radiograph? Mandibular occlusal projections
Lower 90 degree occlusal (true occlusal
Lower 45 degree occlusal (standard occlusal)
Lower oblique occlusal Classification Maxillary occlusal projections
Upper standard occlusal
Upper oblique occlusal Indications Upper standard (or anterior) occlusal periapical assessment of upper anterior teeth for those who intolerate periapical holders
determined the presence of unerupted canines, supernumeraries and odontomes
as a midline view, for determining the bucco/palatal position of unerupted canines
evaluation of the size and extent of lesions : cysts or tumours in the anterior maxilla
assessments of fractures of the anterior teeth and alveolar bone 1. Patient is seated with the head supported and with the occlusal plane horizontal and parallel to the floor

2. The image receptor is placed flat,centrally on to the occlusal surfaces of the lower teeth and asked to bite gently

3. The X-ray tubehead is positioned above the patient in the midline, downwards through the bridge of the nose at an angle of 65-70 degree to the image receptor Technique and positioning Indications
periapical assessment of the upper posterior teeth, those who intolerate PA image receptor holders

evaluation of the size and extent of lesions : cysts, tumours or other bone lesions

assessment of the antral floor

as an aid to determine position of roots displaced into the antrum

assessment of fractures : dentoalveolar # of posterior region Upper oblique occlusal Technique and positioning 1. The patient is seated with the head and with the occlusal plane horizontal and parallel to the floor

2. The image receptor is inserted into the mouth on to the occlusal surfaces of the lower teeth, with its long axis anteroposteriorly,to the side of mouth under investigation

3. The X-ray tubehead is positioned to the side of the patient's face, aiming downwards through the cheek at an angle of 65-70 degree to the image Indications
Detection of calculi in the submandibular salivary duct
Assessment of the bucco-lingual position of unerupted mandibular teeth
Evaluation of the bucco-lingual expansiong of the body of the mandible : cyst, tumour or others
Assessment of displacement fractures of the anterior body of mandible Lower 90 degree occlusal 1. The image receptor, is place centrally on the occlusal surfaces of the lower teeth, with its long axis crossways and is asked to bite gently

2. The patient then leans forwards and then tips the head backwards

3. The X-ray tubehead is placed below the patient's chin, in the midline, at an angle of 90 degree to the image receptor Technique and positioning Indications
Periapical assessment of the lower incisor teeth, those intolerate PA X-ray

Evaluation of the size and extent of lesions : cyst, tumours affecting the anterior part of the mandible

Assessment of displacement fractures of the anterior mandible in the vertical plane Lower 45 degree (or anterior) occlusal 1. The patient is seated with the head supported and with the occlusal plane horizontal and parallel to the floor

2. The image receptor, is placed centrally into the mouth, on to the occlusal surfaces of the lower teeth, with its long axis anteroposteriorly, and the patient is asked to bite gently together

3. The X-ray tubehead is positioned in the midline, centring through the chin point, at an angle of 45 degree to the image receptor Technique and positioning Lower oblique occlusal Indications
Detection of radiopaque calculi in the submandibular salivary gland of interest

Assessment of the buccolingual position of unerupted lower wisdom teeth

Evaluation of the extent and expansion of cyst, tumours or other bone lesions 1. Similar as previous technique

2. Patient head rotated away from the side under investigation and the chin is raised

3. The X-ray tube head is aimed upwards and forwards towards the image receptor, from below and behind the angle of mandible and parallel to the lingual surface of the mandible Technique and positioning 1. To define bitewing and occlusal radiography and its indication.

2. To learn ideal technique required to perform the radiography.

3. To learn about the positioning techniques.

4. To be able to assess image quality, detect error and its causes.

5. To be able to produce a radiograph using the right technique and acceptable images. (using image receptor holders with beam aiming devices)
Full transcript