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IBLLHL Written Task 2 Critical Response Essay

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by

Breanna Reynolds

on 28 December 2012

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Transcript of IBLLHL Written Task 2 Critical Response Essay

IBLLHL
WRITTEN TASK
#2 One of the tasks submitted for external assessment must be a critical response to one of six prescribed questions (task 2). Task 2 takes the form of a critical response and is a requirement of the HL course only.
Do I include a rationale?

A rationale is not included with task 2. Instead, students are expected to complete an outline. This outline is submitted with the task for external assessment.This outline must be completed in class time and must include:

• the prescribed question that has been chosen
• the title of the text(s) for analysis
• the part of the course to which the task refers
• three or four key points that explain the particular focus of the task.









How do I reference material?

Where appropriate, task 2 must reference, in a bibliography, the relevant support documentation such as the newspaper article or magazine advertisement on which it is based.Where a complete shorter text is chosen (for example, a newspaper article or an advertisement from a magazine) students may refer to other texts to support their response.









What style do I write in?

The critical response is in the style of a formal essay and must be clearly structured with an introduction, clearly developed ideas or arguments and a conclusion. Text and genre

Students are encouraged to consider the genre in which a text is placed. Certain textual features belong to a particular genre and can be identified by a particular reader or audience. Writers make use of, or deviate from, particular conventions of genre in order to achieve particular effects. Students may also explore how texts borrow from other texts, and how texts can be re-imagined or reconstructed.Examples of conventions of genre include:
• structure
• storyline
• characterization
• stylistic devices
• tone, mood and atmosphere
• register
• visual images and layout.













The following are examples of texts that may be studied for student responses to question 2.

• The study and analysis of how a particular character from a work of fiction is re-imagined in a song lyric
• The study and analysis of religious imagery and references in political speeches
• The study and analysis of one of the stories from Borges’s Ficciones
• The study and analysis of the use of the courtly love tradition in Romeo and Juliet The aims of task 2 are: • to consider in greater detail the material studied in the four parts of the language A: language and literature course • to reflect and question in greater depth the values, beliefs and attitudes that are implied in the texts studied to encourage students to view texts in a number of ways • to enable students to give an individual response to the way in which texts can be understood in the light of the prescribed questions. Formal
Requirements
for
Task 2 There are two prescribed questions for each of the areas of study listed below. Task 2 is a critical response to one of these six questions. The prescribed questions are designed to be as open as possible and are intended to highlight broad areas within which students can explore and develop their responses to the texts. The prescribed questions remain the same from session to session. See the section “Task 2— questions” in this guide. Critical response is based on material studied in the course. This material could be a longer work such as a novel or a group of poems. It could also be a shorter text or texts such as a newspaper article or a sports blog. What do I write my critical response on? Practical requirements for task 2

In addition to these noted for task 1, students are required to:

• include, where appropriate, bibliographic reference to the text(s) on which the critical response is based when submitting the assessed work. Areas of study for task 2

In preparation for task 2, students must address one of the following areas of study, which correspond to the topics and material studied in the four parts of the course. Reader, culture and text

Students are encouraged to consider that a text’s meaning is determined by the reader and by the cultural context. The interpretation of a text is dependent on various factors, including:
• the reader and producer’s cultural identity or identities
• age
• gender
• social status
• the historical and cultural settings of the text and its production
• aspects of language and translation. Power and privilege

Students are encouraged to consider how and why social groups are represented in texts in particular ways. In addition, consideration may be given to who is excluded from or marginalized in a text, or whose views are silenced. Social groups could include:
women
• adolescents
• senior citizens
• children
• immigrants
• ethnic minorities
• professions. The following are examples of texts that may be studied for student responses to question 2.

• An article from a newspaper and how it would be written in a different newspaper
• A comic book or graphic novel for teenagers in the 1950s rewritten for teenagers in the 21st century
• The study and analysis of a literary work on the theme of prejudice that highlights different assumptions about race, religion, and so on
• The study and analysis of an article about social class from a country that has a very hierarchical class structure (the significance of language that identifies class distinctions is of primary focus)

The following are examples of texts that may be studied for student responses to question 1.

• The study and analysis of an article in which an urban tribe is represented in a negative way
• The representation of social groups in the novel The Yacoubian Building by Alaa al Aswany Task 2
Questions

Reader, culture and text

1. How could the text be read and interpreted differently by two different readers? The following are examples of texts that may be studied for student responses to question 1.

• The study and analysis of possible readings of the final pages of part 1 of the novel The Outsider by a French and Algerian reader at the time of the Algerian war of independence
• The study and analysis of possible readings of an extract from the screenplay of La Grande Illusion by a French public in the early 1930s and late 1930s
• The study and analysis of a political speech by a world leader that excludes references to certain groups or issues (those excluded will read the speech differently)
• The study and analysis of different views of an article on obesity (this article may be viewed differently by someone from a country with problems of poverty and famine and by someone from a wealthy consumer society) Reader, culture and text

2. If the text had been written in a different time or place or language or for a different audience, how and why might it differ? Power and privilege

1. How and why is a social group represented in a particular way? Text and genre

1. How does the text conform to, or deviate from, the conventions of a particular genre, and for what purpose? The following are examples of texts that may be studied for student responses to question 1.

• The study and analysis of an author’s reworking of fairy tales
• The study and analysis of a novel that uses dramatic dialogue, poetry, letters, accounts of journeys
• The study and analysis of media texts with a particular format, style and register Text and genre

2. How has the text borrowed from other texts, and with what effects? Power and privilege

2. Which social groups are marginalized, excluded or silenced within the text? The following are examples of texts that may be studied for student responses to question 2.

• Chinese fiction in which the figure of the intellectual is either revered or condemned
• Representations of the Roma in the contemporary popular press
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