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Poetry Terms

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by

Oriana Said

on 8 November 2013

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Transcript of Poetry Terms

Poetry Terms
Alliteration:
the repetition of consonants in words and phrases:

For example: she sells sea shells on the sea shore.
Assonance:
the repetition of vowel sounds in words and phrases:

For example: Moses supposes his toses are roses.
Iambic pentamater:
a line of poetry made up of ten syllables:

For example: Is / this / the / face / that / launched / a / thou / sand / ships?
Blank Verse:
unrhymed poetry written in iambic pentameter:

For example:
Me / and / my / friend / went / to / have / an / ice / cream
We / sat / down / under / neath / an / um / bre / la
Compound Words:
two words made up of two already existing words. They are often used to shorten the descriptions:

For example: cupboard, teacup, highchair.
Couplet:
two lines of poetry.. A
rhyming couplet
are two lines of poetry which rhyme.

For example: I love you, you love me
We're a happy family
Enjambment:
a line in which the meaning continues with no punctuation into the following line or stanza.

For example: rowing underneath the diamond patterned sky
he threw the body bag into the silent lake
Free Verse:
poetry which seems to have no set pattern, stanzas or ryhme.
Form:
the shape or pattern in which a poem is written.
Imagery:
the descriptive language used by a writer to paint a picture.

It refers to visual images: colours and shapes.
Metaphor:
a comparison: saying one thing is another.

For example: That guy is a pig! He east everything!
Metre:
a regular rhythm: a metric verse. The measuring of poetry by counting stressed syllables.
Onomatopoeia:
words which describe sounds and also sound like the sound they describe:

For example: splash, howl, screech.
Paradox:
the joining of ideas which are completely opposite each other:

For example: A well-known secret-agent.
Personification:
when objects are given human characteristics:

For example: the walls have ears / death knocked at the door.
Quatrain:
four lines of poetry.
Rhyme scheme:
the pattern of rhyme in a poetry:

For example: a b a b c d c d.
Rhythm:
The movement of language in poetry.
Similie:
A comparison between two things. Very often the words used are 'like' or 'as'.

For example: As slow as a turtle, he ran like the wind.
Sonnet:
a poem of fourteen lines written in iambic pentameter.
Theme:
The main, central idea or message the written is trying to get across. It can be a hidden theme:

For example: a poet writing about a crashing destroyed car may mean the destroyed hopes of someone.
Symbolism:
When a word or phrase bring other ideas to mind. The meaning of the words of phrases are very often determined by the context:

For example: rose = love, flag = country, sun = life/energy.
Tone:
The attitude the poet has towards the subject of the poem. He can be angry, sad, bitter and so on.
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