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The Humanists Model of Behaviour Management

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Christian Pettitt

on 23 September 2013

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Transcript of The Humanists Model of Behaviour Management

Humanistic Philosophies
in Education

allocates equal worth to all people,

bases teachers' status on being skilled at what they do (authority based on expertise),

teachers as the facilitator of student achievement,

humanistic teachers respect themselves and the students,


The Humanist View of Teaching
A simple but humorous comparative view of Humanist teachers.

Note the metaphors contained:
The Jedi Force = the school system,
Yoda and Darth Vader = teachers.
What is Humanism?
It is important to start this journey with a deeper appreciation that Humanism extends beyond the educational walls of our schools and classrooms.

The philosophies of Humanism are embedded within the nature of human existence.

Humanism is a progressive philosophy of life that, affirms our ability and responsibility to lead ethical lives of personal fulfillment that aspire to the greater good of humanity.

Believes humans are an evolutionary product of nature; that the mind is a function of the brain and there is no conscious survival after death.

Further philosophical statements supporting the Humanist movement can be found at:
http://www.humanistsofutah.org/what.html

The Principles of
Humanistic Education

1. Students' learning should be self-directed,

2. Schools should produce students who want and know how to learn,

3. The only form of meaningful evaluation is self-evaluation,

4. Feelings, as well as knowledge, are important in the learning process,

5. Students learn best in a nonthreatening environment.

child takes



responsibility for their education
teacher is


the facilitator
development of the child's self-esteem
A
Student
Centred
Approach
learning ownership is developed
teacher is concerned with both academic and emotional needs of the student
participation and discovery methods
The goals of Humanistic Education
teaches a wide variety of skills - reading, writing, computation, communicating, thinking, decision making,problem solving and knowing oneself
a humane approach to education - instils self-belief and potential, encourages compassion, understanding and fosters respect for self and others.
deals with basic human concerns - quality of life, the pursuit of knowledge, to grow, to love, a meaningful existence.
believes in the innate capacity for growth,

see's children's ability to display goodness,

they are capable of considerate behaviour,

believes in children's status as human beings.

The Humanist view of children
Abraham Maslow (1908 - 1970)
The father of Humanist psychology who developed the Hierarchy of Needs.

Maslow believed that self-
actualisation is the ultimate
psychological needs

The needs of the lower
levels must be satisfied
before the next level
can be achieved.
http://sageamethyst.com/?p=82
Self-
actualisation
self-aware
self -accepting
not
concerned
by others opinions
open
and
loving
caring and
spontaneous
focused
on a
particular
task
www.empowerment-and-kids.com
development of self-efficacy by setting and achieving appropriate goals
www.kidactivities.net
forgottendiseases.org
www.childcustodylaw.co.uk
teacherswithapps.com
theeducatorsroom.com
Agreed with Maslow but added:

'For a person to grow the environment must provide'
Carl Rogers (1902 - 1987)
Genuineness
(openness,
self-discourse)
Acceptance
(being seen with unconditional
positive regard)
Empathy
(being listened to
and understood)
Without these, relationships and healthy personalities will not develop as they should.
Rogers believed that for a person to achieve
self-actualisation they must be in a state of congruence.

Self-image
Ideal-self
The development of congruence is dependent on unconditional positive regard.
The Humanist View of Disruptive Behaviour
Behaviour comes from within.
We choose how to deal with the information the world gives us.
Haim Ginott (1922 - 1973)
Placed an emphasis on congruent communication - communication that is harmonious with students' feelings about situations and themselves,
asked teachers to use sane messages and laconic language - laconic language is defined as, "short and to the point-when responding to or redirecting student misbehavior",
encouraged teachers to use I-messages instead of you-messages,
urged teachers not to ask questions when discussing behaviour issues; just explain or demonstrate the appropriate behavior.
Thomas
Gordon

The Humanist View of Behaviour Management
egalitarian not authoritarian, a positive view of students,

a preventative approach,

describes human behaviour as 'free choice'; not punishment, coercion and compliance,

based on internal motivation; not external rewards and praise,

focuses the effects of one's behaviour upon others,

see's relationships as equal,

a value not a rule driven system,

based on ethical thinking, the essence of responsible behaviour,

based on real world problem solving,

defines behaviour as the violation of someone's rights.
Behaviour Intervention: Sanctuary/ Positive Time Out
ANGRY STUDENT
Strengths of the Humanistic Model of Behaviour Management
views people as positive, forward moving, constructive, realistic and trustworthy,

intuitively correct,

is a democratic approach to human behaviour linked to human rights,

exists within a no fail environment.
Weaknesses of the Humanistic Model of Behaviour Management
Source: Porter, L, 2006, ‘Student Behaviour: Theory and Practice for Teachers’, 3rd Edition, Allen & Unwin, NSW, Australia
Behaviour Intervention: Communication
SKILL of LISTENING
SKILL of COLLABORATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING
SKILL of ASSERTIVENESS
The aim of humanism is to find a solution not a culprit.

(Porter, 2006)
When students unmet social and emotional needs impact their own learning:
more than hearing
an active process
requires generosity, empathy, open mindedness
avoid roadblocks
What are communication roadblocks?
JUDGING
(criticising, blaming, name calling, praising, diagnosing, interpreting)
SENDING SOLUTIONS
(giving orders, preaching, issuing threats, interrogating)
AVOIDING OTHER PEOPLES FEELINGS
(distraction from the problem, reassuring)
Active Listening
The Gordon model of effective relationships teaches Active Listening.

Watch Raymond utilise his skills in Active Listening to solve family related problems. Note his skill of reflecting back to the meanings and feelings of the individual and their problems.
Source: http://www.gordontraining.com/thomas-gordon/origins-of-the-gordon-model/
When your own or other students needs are being violated:
model courtesy and self-discipline you wish to observe in the student,

regulate and communicate feelings fairly,

avoid victim and blame language,

use a script: 'I feel... because I need..'
Source: Porter, L, 2006, ‘Student Behaviour: Theory and Practice for Teachers’, 3rd Edition, Allen & Unwin, NSW, Australia
Source: Porter, L, 2006, ‘Student Behaviour: Theory and Practice for Teachers’, 3rd Edition, Allen & Unwin, NSW, Australia
When a behaviour impacts you or one or more students.
Increases the likelihood of finding a solution,
Enhances and empowers student motivation to the agreed action.
How?
1. Talk it over.
2. Find solutions.
3. Agree on a solution.
4. Determine implementation.
5. Evaluate if its working.
Source: Porter, L, 2006, ‘Student Behaviour: Theory and Practice for Teachers’, 3rd Edition, Allen & Unwin, NSW, Australia
Source: Porter, L, 2006, ‘Student Behaviour: Theory and Practice for Teachers’, 3rd Edition, Allen & Unwin, NSW, Australia
FIGHTING STUDENT
AGGRESSIVE STUDENT
voluntary or involuntary time away,
no time limits,
allow time for student to come up with a plan to resolve behaviour,
teacher remains warm, pleasant and happy to engage a discussion,
based on the principle if you cannot behave socially, they cannot be social.
Is the
behaviour helping to reach personal goals?
When student is willing, talk the issue through...
FOCUS ON SOLUTIONS
Behaviour Intervention: Student Counseling
www.brainpowerlearning.com
stepsforchange.com
amandabasse.com
suburbanrobin.blogspot.com
www.schcounselor.com
Student with disruptive
behaviour is counseled
by teacher.
Guide to identify triggers
for disruptive
behaviour.
LISTEN & SHOW
home life and traumatic
events
Differently
&
ACT
Improve
Identify needs and wants from school
Source: Porter, L, 2006, ‘Student Behaviour: Theory and Practice for Teachers’, 3rd Edition, Allen & Unwin, NSW, Australia
difficult to test and validate scientifically,

tends to be too optimistic, minimising some of the more destructive aspects of human nature,

approaches are dependant on teacher capabilities.

Source: Classroom Management Website, viewed online 22 September 2013,
http://classroommanagementwebsite.weebly.com/supporting-theorists.html

Haim Ginott quote from his book: Teacher and Child (1972)
recognised for teaching communication and conflict resolution skills to parents, teachers, youth and businesses,

created the Gordon model of effective relationships,

The model included the core skills of the Gordon Model such as Active Listening, I-Messages, Problem Ownership, and the 12 Roadblocks to Communication.
Source: Gordon Training Website, 2011, viewed online 22 September 2013,
http://www.gordontraining.com/

www.gordon-training.ch
EXPLORATION
MISTAKES
UNMET INTELLECTUAL
or EMOTIONAL NEEDS
REACTIVE
BEHAVIOURAL PROBLEMS
Students learn by exploring their environment and the rules within their physical world.
Students WILL make mistakes. Mistakes provide an opportunity to learn.
Students will complete school work when it meets their needs. Student dysfunctional behaviour can result when emotional misunderstandings occur.
Students react and disrupt as a result of a violation to their autonomy and attempts to control through authoritative practices.
Source: Porter, L, 2006, ‘Student Behaviour: Theory and Practice for Teachers’, 3rd Edition, Allen & Unwin, NSW, Australia
Source: Porter, L, 2006, ‘Student Behaviour: Theory and Practice for Teachers’, 3rd Edition, Allen & Unwin, NSW, Australia
Source: McLeod, S, 2007, “Carl Rogers”, Simple Psychology Website, viewed online 19 September 2013, http://www.simplypsychology.org/carl-rogers.html
Source: McLeod, S, 2007, “Carl Rogers”, Simple Psychology Website, viewed online 19 September 2013, http://www.simplypsychology.org/carl-rogers.html
Source: Humanist Approach to Teachers Website, n.d., viewed online 19 September 2013, http://homepage.ntlworld.com/gary.sturt/human.htm
The Humanist Symbol
pastor-dave.org
Further research relating to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Human Needs and Self-Actualisation can be found at Simple Psychology Website:
http://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html
Full transcript