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The Former Yugoslavia

Global Diplomacy Foundations Project
by

Alexandra Theriot

on 27 September 2012

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Transcript of The Former Yugoslavia

The Former Yugoslavia Bosnia & Herzegovina Croatia Macedonia Montenegro Serbia Slovenia Vojvodina Introduction: In 1918, the Yugoslavian Monarchy was created.
In 1945, after the defeat of the Axis powers in World War II, Yugoslavia becomes a communist republic under Prime Minister Tito, where the kingdom is now called the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia.
Later establishing six republics and two self governing provinces.
By 1992 tension begin to rise between bordering republics. Josip Broz Tito
1892-1980
Prime Minister of Yugoslavia
"Benevolent Dictator" Josip Broz Tito Internet Archive. N.d. Photograph. Josip Broz Tito Internet Archive. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.marxists.org/archive/tito/index.htm>. 1991, Croatia declares independence.
12% of Croatia's population is Serbian, making the succession unwelcome.
Fights break out for the next four years. 1991, Slovenia declares independence with Croatia.
90% of Slovenia's population is Slovenian.
Succession was welcomed with peace. Keep in mind: Yugoslavia is made up of 6 different provinces with very different ethnic backgrounds and geographical identities. 1992, Macedonia declares independence 1992, Bosnia and Herzegovina declare independence.
Bosnia is one of the most culturally diverse republics.
According to the 1991 Yugoslavian Census, Bosnia's ethnic population was 43% muslim, 31% Serbian, 17% Croatian.
Serbians were determined to build a better Serbia and keep Yugoslavia together.
Violent war began. "Timeline: The Former Yugoslavia." Infoplease.
© 2000–2007 Pearson Education, publishing as Infoplease.
22 Sep. 2012 <http://www.infoplease.com/spot/yugotimeline1.html>. Kosovo By: Alex Theriot Global Diplomacy Foundations Project 1992, Serbia and Montenegro form the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
Slobodan Milosevic is declared the leader.
Was not recognized by the U.S. Slobodan Milosevic Milosevic sought to revise Serbia's constitution and suppress the self governing province of Kosovo.
Seized control of the Yugoslav National Army (JNA).
Used strong propaganda against Bosnian Muslims to gain support for his "ethnic cleansing" plan. Bosinan Genocide "On April 6, 1992, the Bosnian Serbs began their siege of Sarajevo. Muslim, Croat, and Serb residents opposed to a Greater Serbia were cut off from food, utilities, and communication. Through three long and cold winters, Sarajevans dodged sniper fire as they collected firewood and tried to get to their jobs. Food was scarce and the average weight loss per person was more than 30 pounds. More than 12,000 residents were killed, 1,500 of them children.

Throughout Bosnia, Bosnian Serb nationalists and the JNA began a systematic policy of "ethnic cleansing" (a polite term for genocide) to establish a "pure" Serb republic. They drove out all other ethnic groups by terrorizing and forcibly displacing non-Serbs through direct shelling and sniper attacks. Entire villages were destroyed. Thousands were expelled from their homes, held in detention camps, raped, tortured, deported, or summarily executed. Rape was a military tactic to destroy the bonds of families and communities." "History of the War in Bosnia." History of the War in Bosnia. Center for Balkan Development, May 1996. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.balkandevelopment.org/edu_bos.html>. Kosovo Intervention
The Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA), began to protest against Serbian rule in 1998.
Resulted in NATO air strikes on the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
Ended Yugoslav wars In 2006, Montenegro declares independence "Montenegro Declares Independence." Belgrade Radio - Montenegro Declares Independence. Belgrade Radio, 2006. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://archive.wn.com/2006/07/01/1400/p/37/3878d4224555d3.html>. "NATO Bombing of Yugoslavia." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 22 Sept. 2012. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO_bombing_of_Yugoslavia>. "Google Images." Google Images. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.google.com/imgres?num=10>. CBS News. "Reporting the Genocide in Srebrenica, Bosnia." 60 Minutes/ CBS News Archives. CBS. 14 July 1995. YouTube. YouTube, 26 May 2011. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SS-6fAXZSSk>. is arrested in 2001, and charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity in Bosnia, Croatia, and Kosovo, as well as committing genocide in Bosnia by the UN International Criminal Tribunal.
Milosevic is the first head of state to face an international war-crimes court.
Died in 2006, before the trial could finish. Milosevic Continued Impact THEN:
Violent wars
Genocide in Bosnia- "Ethnic Cleansing" controversy
Communism
Foreign Policy
Fighting dictators Impact TODAY:
If they can do it, we can do it too!
Arab Spring
recognition of independent countries and foreign states by the U.S.
Genocide intervention Conclusion Works Cited
BBC News Contributor. "Timeline: Break-up of Yugoslavia." BBC News. BBC, 22 May 2006. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4997380.stm>.
Brunner, Borgna, and David Johnson. "Timeline: The Former Yugoslavia." Infoplease. Infoplease, 2007. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.infoplease.com/spot/yugotimeline1.html>.
CBS News. "Reporting the Genocide in Srebrenica, Bosnia." 60 Minutes/ CBS News Archives. CBS. 14 July 1995. YouTube. YouTube, 26 May 2011. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SS-6fAXZSSk>.
"Google Images." Google Images. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.google.com/imgres?num=10>.
"History of the War in Bosnia." History of the War in Bosnia. Center for Balkan Development, May 1996. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.balkandevelopment.org/edu_bos.html>.
"The History Place - Genocide in the 20th Century: Bosnia-Herzegovina 1992-95." The History Place - Genocide in the 20th Century: Bosnia-Herzegovina 1992-95. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/genocide/bosnia.htm>.
Josip Broz Tito Internet Archive. Photograph. Josip Broz Tito Internet Archive. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.marxists.org/archive/tito/index.htm>.
Mahairas, Evangelos. "The Breakup of Yugoslavia." The Breakup of Yugoslavia. International Action Center. Web. 24 Sept. 2012. <http://www.iacenter.org/folder02/hidden_em.htm>.
"Montenegro Declares Independence." BBC News. BBC, 06 Apr. 2006. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/5043462.stm>.
"Montenegro Declares Independence." Belgrade Radio - Montenegro Declares Independence. Belgrade Radio, 2006. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://archive.wn.com/2006/07/01/1400/p/37/3878d4224555d3.html>.
"NATO Bombing of Yugoslavia." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 22 Sept. 2012. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO_bombing_of_Yugoslavia>.
PBS Contributors. "Summary of the Dayton Peace Agreement on Bosnia-Herzegovina." PBS. PBS. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/bosnia/dayton_peace.html>.
"Slobodan Milosevic's Biography." Slobodan Milosevic's Biography. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://www.slobodan-milosevic.org/biography.htm>.
"Timeline Yugoslavia." Timeline Yugoslavia. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. <http://timelines.ws/countries/YUGOSLAVIA.HTML>.
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