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John Donne Holy Sonnet 14

Orlando Rodriguez. English 4 honors 3rd period
by

Master Freakse

on 30 April 2013

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Transcript of John Donne Holy Sonnet 14

Batter My Heart, Three-Personed God Structure Batter my heart, three-person'd God, for you
As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to mend;
That I may rise and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend
Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me new.
I, like an usurp'd town to'another due,
Labor to'admit you, but oh, to no end;
Reason, your viceroy in me, me should defend,
But is captived, and proves weak or untrue.
Yet dearly'I love you, and would be loved fain,
But am betroth'd unto your enemy;
Divorce me,'untie or break that knot again,
Take me to you, imprison me, for I,
Except you'enthrall me, never shall be free,
Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me. Rhyme Scheme ABBAABBACDCEDD Loose Iambic Pentameter First Qautrain, Lines 1-4 Batter my heart, three-person'd God, for you
As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to mend;
That I may rise and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend
Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me new. Diction: Imagery: Tone: Hyperbole: Batter my heart, three-person'd God, for you
As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to mend;
That I may rise and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend
Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me new. Metonymy: Batter my heart, three-person'd God, for you
As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to mend;
That I may rise and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend
Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me new. Batter my heart, three-person'd God, for you
As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to mend;
That I may rise and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend
Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me new. Batter my heart, three-person'd God, for you
As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to mend;
That I may rise and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend
Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me new. Battering Ram Extremely powerful, effective & violent
weapon in Donne's day. Must be operated by more than one person. Allows the reader to imagine a crew of people carrying a battering ram attempting to destroy a man's heart. The term "Batter" immediately sets
a violent tone to the poem. The speaker is not asking God to literally
Batter, or destroy his human heart, he is seeking
spiritual destruction which will then lead to renewal. "Three-Personed God" is a remaning for God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. This line attributes qualities and actions to God, whom the speaker is addressing.
Describes what God is doing. Saying "Batter My Heart" sets a demanding tone by commanding God to do something. This line reveals what the speaker is seeking
from God, he wishes to rise and stand before
him and feels that God needs to overthrow
him in order to do this. Alliteration: "Break, Blow, Burn" Break, blow and burn parrallel knock, breathe, and shine in line 2. These terms allude to the three persons of the trinity. "Break" and "Knock" refer to God the Son who has “broken sin” and “Knocks at the door of the heart”. The terms “Blow” and “breathe” allude to God the Father, as it was in this manner that God created humans in Genesis Chapter 1. Finally, the terms “Burn” and “Shine” allude to the Holy Spirit whose “fire burns” and whose “light shines”. Paradox: Donne’s speaker wishes to “be made new” through the actions of “battering, breaking, blowing and burning”. This presents an extreme paradox because these actions are known to destroy one, yet the speaker is seeking them to rebuild. English 4 Honors
Period 3
April 29 , 2013 John Donne Orlando Rodriguez Holy Sonnet XIV Second Qautrain, Lines 5-8 I, like an usurp'd town to'another due,
Labor to'admit you, but oh, to no end;
Reason, your viceroy in me, me should defend,
But is captived, and proves weak or untrue. I, like an usurp'd town to'another due,
Labor to'admit you, but oh, to no end;
Reason, your viceroy in me, me should defend,
But is captived, and proves weak or untrue. I, like an usurp'd town to'another due,
Labor to'admit you, but oh, to no end;
Reason, your viceroy in me, me should defend,
But is captived, and proves weak or untrue. I, like an usurp'd town to'another due,
Labor to'admit you, but oh, to no end;
Reason, your viceroy in me, me should defend,
But is captived, and proves weak or untrue. Diction: Diction: Simile: Imagery: The speaker uses a simile to compare
himself to a “usurped town”. Usurped town a town that has been taken by force.

the speaker feels that his spirituality and mental state (soul) have been taken from him by force and he now feels trapped. Due Belonging To Donne’s use of the word due reveals that the speaker feels that he now belongs to the capturer of his (soul), aka the town. This line provides the reader with an image of a town that has been captured under siege and the reader can now empathize with the speaker and his current predicament. Shift in Tone: By saying “oh, to no end” the speakers demanding tone shifts to one of a more passionate begging and this evokes sympathy from the reader. A viceroy substitute for the King, and is referring to God’s reason making “viceroy” a metonymy or renaming. Metonymy: By this comparison the speaker views himself as a town on which God has bestowed reason, this reason is what should defend the speaker from sin and the desire to commit sin. In scanning the poem, by stressing the conjunction “or” in this line the speaker is implying that his reason is untrue, or a traitor, which strengthens the speakers lament that his reason has been captured. Diction/Structure By the speaker comparing himself to a captured town whose reason has too been captured and betrayed him and now belongs to another the speaker contributes to the central idea of the poem by emphasizing the necessity of God’s force and assistance in the matter of spiritual renewal. Third Qautrain, Lines 9-12 Yet dearly'I love you, and would be loved fain,
But am betroth'd unto your enemy;
Divorce me,'untie or break that knot again, Yet dearly'I love you, and would be lov'd fain,
But am betroth'd unto your enemy;
Divorce me,'untie or break that knot again, Yet dearly'I love you, and would be lov'd fain,
But am betroth'd unto your enemy;
Divorce me,'untie or break that knot again,
Take me to you, imprison me, for I,
Except you'enthrall me, never shall be free,Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me. Turn: The turn is signaled by the term “yet” in the beginning of line 9 and then reveals that despite the fact that the speaker feels as if his strives at spiritual renewal have been in vain he still dearly loves the God his heart is after and would gladly be loved in return. Metaphor: The speaker is comparing himself to the bridegroom to the enemy of God, the enemy referring back to “Reason” (line 7) or even Satan. The speaker concludes that it is because of this marriage to the enemy of God (sin) that he cannot be loved by God in the way that he desires. Allusion: In the Garden of Eden God was forced to break the knot between himself and Adam and Eve because they chose to be betrothed to God’s enemy instead. This implication reveals that the speaker is comparing himself to Adam and Eve and asking God to divorce him from Satan or he will be forced to break the knot between them as well. This verse begins to propose the solution of the poem by asking God to "Imprison" the speaker. The third quatrain portrays a critical extended metaphor of the speaker being the bridegroom of God’s enemy and then begging God to divorce him from said enemy unless God will be forced to break the knot, or bond, between the speaker and himself as well. Sestet, Lines 13-14 Take me to you, imprison me, for I,Except you'enthrall me, never shall be free,
Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me. Diction: “enthrall” enslave
“ravish” can be taken in different ways
one meaning being to take away by force
another being to rape
either meaning carries a negative connotation Paradox: In this couplet the speaker is essentially telling God that unless he enslaves the speaker he shall never be free, and unless he rapes the speaker he shall never be chaste. Critics, however, have not taken this request in a sacrilegious or impure way. According to Ettari’s critique of this poem “in the attempt to gain spiritual "newness," Donne goes beyond even the paradoxical language mentioned previously. These final lines indicate both the intensity of the speaker's desire to be closer to God and his frustration with God“. The speaker here presents such an intense and immediate desire for God’s attention and help that he has likened his situation to a sexual desire that portrays great intensity and force, the very thing he desires from God The speaker concludes that if God does not capture him and force his will upon him then the he will never be able to remain truly faithful to God, revealing the theme that one needs God’s assistance and will in order to rise above oneself and prove faithful to God. John Donne utilizes a relatable speaker, good structure, diction, tone, alliteration, hyperbole, metaphors, paradox, metonymy, imagery, allusion and symbolism to reveal his theme that when one acts desperately in need of God’s assistance and it becomes necessary to cry out to God's name for protection from temptation and sin but at the same time however we cannot command god to help us but instead push away our sins through devotion and love to the lord because if we doubt god then we open ourselves up to sin and as such lose gods favor in us. Holy Sonnet XIV In Batter My Heart, Three-Personed God John Donne utilizes structure, diction, tone and a number of literary devies to reveal the theme Theme
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