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Roles of Women in Ancient Africa

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Allison Musgrove

on 3 March 2013

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Transcript of Roles of Women in Ancient Africa

1500 BCE- 1500 CE Political Strand Rulers of Nubia appointed their daughters as “God’s Wife of Amun”. The "God's Wives of Amun" served as administrators in a large economic domain. This domain was located in ancient Thebes, a center of religion. The domain supposedly belonged to the God Amun. The “God’s Wives of Amun” were also given control over the land and the money of the empire. Economical Strand Geographical Strand Women studied science and medicine until the Phoenicians, and later the Romans, took over Northern Africa. The Romans and Phoenicians opposed women studying things like science and math in Northern Africa. While women were not allowed to study math and science in North Africa, women were encouraged to study these subjects in Southern and Central Africa. Women, if not part of the government, worked around the house or held a job such as being a weaver, composer, musician, dancer, priestess, and hairdresser.
Women in Africa, particularly women in Egypt, greatly cared about their appearance. They wore make-up, perfumes, and used scented oils. Social Strand
"Ancient Nubia: Home." Ancient Nubia: Home. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Feb. 2013.
"Female Occupations in Ancient Egypt. Womens Jobs. Work." Female Occupations in Ancient Egypt. Womens Jobs. Work. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Feb. 2013.
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"The Time Has Comeâ¦." The Time Has Come. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Feb. 2013.
"Women in Ancient Egypt - Crystalinks." Women in Ancient Egypt - Crystalinks. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Feb. 2013.
Works Cited Background:
Flickriver - A New Way to View Flickr Photos and More... N.d. Photograph. Flickriver - A New Way to View Flickr Photos and More... Web. 28 Feb. 2013.

AFRICAN, BLACK & DIASPORIC HISTORY. N.d. Photograph. Keltamasheq: Tuareg Poetess Dassine Oult Yemma "... Web. 02 Mar. 2013.
Breaking News & Top Stories - World News, US & Local | NBC News. N.d. Photograph. Nbcnews.com. Web. 02 Mar. 2013.
The College of New Rochelle Library. N.d. Photograph. The College of New Rochelle Library. Web. 02 Mar. 2013.
Women in Ancient Egypt - Crystalinks. N.d. Photograph. Women in Ancient Egypt - Crystalinks. Web. 02 Mar. 2013. Image Bibliography Roles of Women in Ancient
Africa Roles of Women in Africa Women could hold high places in the social class, such as being a queen and the head of the army. The women would start out as the wife or daughter of the king and later be left with the power when the father/husband died. In ancient Egypt, women were given the option of being part of the government but many did not choose to. By Allison Musgrove
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