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Eating for a Healthier You

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Michaela Kremhelmer

on 18 September 2013

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Transcript of Eating for a Healthier You

How can I eat more healthfully?
1. Understand Serving Sizes


2. Eat Nutrient-Dense Foods


3. Reduce Empty Calorie Foods


4. Increase Physical Activity

Eating for a Healthier You
Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010
1. Balance calories
enjoy food but eat less
avoid oversized portions
Vegetarianism: Healthy?
More than 3% or 6-8 million people are vegetarian
Eating Well in College
You
Have to want to change
Essentials:
Calories
[Measure of energy in food]
Water
*A crucial nutrient*
Proteins
"Body Builders"

Hunger vs. Appetite
Hunger:
The physiological impulse to seek food, prompted by the lack of shortage of basic foods needed to provide the energy and nutrients that support health.

Appetite:
The desire to eat; normally accompanies hunger but is more psychological than physiological.

Metabolizes quicker and more efficiently than protein
Converts to glucose which in return fuels body cells
Best for moderate to intense exercise due to quick breakdown
4 calories per gram.
RDA for adults is 130 grams/day

Vitamins
Organic
compounds that help with growth, maintaining life and overall health
Usually get our daily fluids from food, water and other beverages
Nutrients our body cannot synthesize

(or cannot synthesize in adequate amounts)
ESSENTIAL NUTRIENTS:
Carbohydrates
Fats
Saturated Unsaturated

Solid at room temp.
Meat, dairy, and poultry
Liquid at room temp.
Have room for hyrdogen atoms
Plants and vegetable oil
Trans Fatty Acids
Mostly produced when a manufacturer adds hyrdogen to a plant oil. As a result, it solidifies and helps the food last longer on the shelf.
Examples: partially hydrogenated oils, fractionated oils, shortening, lard, hydrogenation
228,000

deaths
from coronary heart disease could be reduced by limiting trans fatty acids.
(Repairs bone, muscle, skin and blood cells)
Provide alternate source for energy when fats and carbs are not available.
Animal
products and
plant
products are sources.
Complete proteins
Incomplete proteins
(Lacks one or more essential amino acid)
(Supplies all nine essential amino acids)
Body then breaks them down into amino acids
Amino acids are the building blocks for proteins
Body consists of 50-70% water by weight.

Aids in fluid, electrolyte and acid-base balance.
Regulate body temperature
Major component in blood.
women: 11 cups total
Men: 16 cups total
AVERAGES
*Found in all food!*
Maintain nerves,
skin
, produce
blood cells
, build bone and teeth, heal wounds and convert food energy to body energy
Fat soluble
= absorbed through intestinal tract with help of fats
Water soluble
= dissolved in water
2. Increase Foods
Fill half of plate with fruits and veggies
Make half of your grains whole
Switch to fat-free or 1% milk
3. Reduce foods
Compare sodium and choose with lower numbers
Drink water instead of sugary drinks
In addition,
23 million
Americans are "vegetarian inclined" meaning they are omnivores that are reducing amount of meat consumed in other "faceless" forms of protein
Vegetarians can also suffer from nutrient deficiencies if they don't know how to combine the right foods
Deficient
in vitamin B, D, calcium, iron, zinc, and other minerals
Ask for nutritional analysis
Order salads, but watch what you add
Try "baked" fries instead of french fries
Avoid giant sizes, and refrain from ordering "extras"
Limit sodas and drinks high in sugar
Choose lean meats
Avoid going back for seconds
Vegetarians actually weigh less and have better cholesterol levels and a lower risk of heart disease
Chose Organic
Organic- foods and beverages developed, grown, or raised without the use of pesticides, chemicals or hormones.
Food sold in the USA has to meet criteria set by the USDA under the National Organic Rule.
National Organic Rule:

Product must be "certified organic"
"100% Organic" - complete compliance with organic criteria
"Organic" - contains >95% organic material
"Made with Organic Ingredients" - contains >75% organic ingredients
"Some Organic Ingredients" - contains <70% organic ingredients
*Must be produced without hormones, antibiotics, or genetic modification*
The Market for organic foods has increased by >20% per year!
REMEMBER:
ALWAYS RINSE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES BEFORE COOKING OR CONSUMING THEM.
Simple Carbohydrates
[Also known as simple sugars]
Found naturally in:
MILK
FRUIT
VEGGIES
Most common form:
GLUCOSE
Defined as:
A carbohydrate made up of only one sugar moelecule, or of two sugar moelecules bonded together
Monosaccharides:
[Simple sugars that contain only one molecule of sugar]
MAIN MONOSACCHARIDES:
Fructose
Glucose
Disaccharides:
[Combinations of two monosaccharides]
Glucose
Fructose
Summary:
Glucose
+
Fructose
=
SUCROSE
[
[
Disaccharide
Examples of disaccharides:
Lactose -milk sugar-
Maltose -malt sugar-
All disaccharides must be broken down into monosaccharides
CAUTION
*Before the body can use them
Complex Carbohydrates
Found in:
Grains
Cereals
Veggies
Also known as: POLYsaccharides
Poly- means many
therefore,
a polysaccharide is many -saccharides
STARCH
GLYCOGEN
FIBER
are the main types of complex carbs
LDL's:
low-density lipoproteins
BAD
GOOD
HDL's
high-density lipoproteins
=
=
Compounds that transport cholesterol in the blood to the body's cells
Compounds that facilitate the transport of cholesterol in the blood to the liver for metabolism & elimination from the body
*most abundant in the human body*
Bran
Endosperm
Germ
*Not pictured*
Anatomy of a Whole Grain
Nutrition Labels:
*Know how to read them*
Food Safety: A Growing Concern
Foodborne Illnesses:
5 Most common:
Norovirus
Salmonella
Clostridium perfringens
Campylobacter
Staphylococcus aureus
How to avoid them:
Food Irradiation:
Look for this label to know whether or not your food has been irradiated!
What is it?
[Exposing foods to low doses of radiation to kill microorganisms or keep them from reproducing]
Food Sensitivities:
Food allergy:
[hypersensitivity]
-Overraction by the immune system to normally harmless proteins, which are perceived as allergens. In response, the body produces antibodies, triggering allergic symptoms-
Where do we lack in society?
Eating well in college
Reading food labels properly, if at all
Why?
a. We are obligated to eat the unhealthy food provided
b. We are unable to afford healthy food
c. Nutritious meals are not always convenient
Fixes?
a. Providing healthy, affordable food for students
b. Allotting money on the student identification cards to be spent at local health food stores
Where do we excel in society?
Eating more whole grains
Why?
a. We are more educated on the power of the whole grain
b. We've found ways to hide it in certain foods
c. People are afraid of all the "bad stuff" in refined grains
Fixes?
a. Completely eliminate refined and processed grains
b. Introduce whole grains to children
c. Strive for the majority of our carbohydrate intake be at the recommended daily amount.
Where do we lack as individuals?
Why?
a. They can be difficult to interpret
b. Inconvenient to read
c. Keeps us in denial as to what we are actually feeding our bodies
Fixes?
a. Become more conscious of them
b. Read them, and make the better decision
c. Have them be more apparent to you
Where do we excel as individuals?
Choosing organic over conventionally grown food
Why?
a. Organic sounds healthier
b. People are becoming more educated on how produce is grown
c. Some people have to
Fixes?
a. Do our best to eat only organic foods
b. Grow your own food
c. Getting more 100% organic foods on the market shelves
Work out or Work down?
Debate Two:
Pros:
1. Gain confidence
2. Lose weight!
3. More energy
4. Have some fun!
5. More motivation to eat a healthier diet
To more exercise
Cons:
1. Make time for it
2. sore
3. Maintenance
4. Feel obligated to exercise
5. Can be hard on your joints and muscles
To more exercise
. N.p.. Web. 2012. <http://www.nationalchickencouncil.org/about-ncc/alliances/>.
"USDA Issues Final Rule on Meat and Poultry Irradiation." . Food Safety and Inspection Service United States Department of Agriculture, n.d. Web. 17 Sep 2013. <http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Oa/background/irrad_final.htm>.
"Choose MyPlate.gov." USDA. N.p.. Web. 17 Sep 2013. <http://www.choosemyplate.gov/print-materials-ordering/graphic-resources.html>.
Leishman, Ron. "CARTOON GUY EXERCISING WITH DUMBBELLS, http://toonclips.com/design/5822
Nash, Sean. "The Molecules Within You." Principles of Biology bringing life and bringing things into focus. Pearson, 21 Nov 2009. Web. 17 Sep 2013. <http://mwsu-bio101.ning.com/profiles/blogs/the-molecules-within-you-1>.
"Disaccharide." Wikipedia. N.p., 7 Apr 2013. Web. 17 Sep 2013. <http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disaccharide>.
"The Whole Truth about Whole Grains." Minute. Riviana Foods Inc. , n.d. Web. 17 Sep 2013. <http://www.minuterice.com/en-us/content/729/TheWholeTruthAboutWholeGrain.asp&xgt;.
Generalic, Eni. "Chemistry Glossary." Periodni.com. N.p.. Web. 17 Sep 2013. <http://glossary.periodni.com/download_image.php?name=polysaccharide.png&source=polysaccharide>.
"National Organic Program." USDA. N.p., 29 11 2012. Web. 17 Sep 2013. <http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/ams.fetchTemplateData.do?&template=TemplateA&leftNav=NationalOrganicProgram&page=NOPOrganicSeal&description=The Organic Seal>.
"Reading Nutrition Labels." H-E-B. H-E-B. Web. 17 Sep 2013. <http://www.heb.com/page/recipes-cooking/cooking-tips/reading-nutrition-labels>.
Works Cited:
Donatelle, Rebecca J. Access to Health. Thirteenth. Print. <www.pearsonhighered.com>.
Getting lots of exercise has many benefits to the human body. However, there can be some drawbacks that keep people from wanting to get out and get active.
Debate One:
Source:
Donatelle, Rebecca J. Access to Health. Thirteenth. Print. <www.pearsonhighered.com>.
Pages 223-224
vegetarians commonly pursue this lifestyle in order to increase concerns for:
Animal Welfare
health improvement
environment
food safety
Pros:
Potential benefits?
-reduced risk of some cancers
[particularly colon cancer and disease of the kidneys]
Cons:
Vegans:
*Must pay attention to the amino acid content of their foods*
[strategically must put together combinations of different foods in order to fulfill their adequate protein intake]
Are you pregnant?
Are you old?
Are you sick?
Do you have vegan children?
If yes to any of these, you MUST consult a health care professional to ensure that your diet is adequate*
Get physical!
Benefits:
-Cardiorespiratory Fitness
-Muscular Strength
-Muscular Endurance
-Flexibility
-Body Composition
Source:
Donatelle, Rebecca J. Access to Health. Thirteenth. Print. <www.pearsonhighered.com>.
Pages 285-286
CAUTION
You must make sure you are taking in proper nutrients for exercise
*It helps in recovery*
[Do not overdo it!]
also
Prevent exercise injuries!
Common injuries:
. Plantar Fasciitis .
. Shin Splints .
. Runners Knee .
source:
Donatelle, Rebecca J. Access to Health. Thirteenth. Print. <www.pearsonhighered.com>.
Pages: 300-301
Chapter Seven
Eating for a Healthier You
Pages: 202-232
Michaela K.
&
Brittney B.
Northern Michigan University
HL111
Full transcript