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Earthquakes

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chase newell

on 12 January 2013

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Transcript of Earthquakes

Earthquakes What is an earthquake? Under what conditions do earthquakes occur? Describe how scientists measure the
strength
of earthquakes. Describe the differences between the modified Mercalli scale and the Richter scale Earthquakes are caused by slippage along a break in the lithosphere, called a fault. The Richter scale is based on the height of the largest seismic wave recorded on a seismogram.
While the modifed Merclli scale rates an earthquake’s intensity in terms of the earthquake’s effects at different locations. An earthquake is the vibration of Earth produced by the rapid release of energy within the lithosphere. A seismograph produces a time record of ground motion, called a seismogram, during an earthquake. a seismograph can consist of a weight suspended from a support attached to bedrock. When seismic waves reach the seismograph, the inertia of the weight keeps it almost stationary while Earth and the support apparatus vibrate. Also the Richter scale
is outdated. Describe how the three main types of seismic waves move and affect the movement of material they pass through P waves are push-pull waves that push (or compress) and pull (or expand) particles in the direction the waves travel. P waves can travel through liquids and solids. P waves travel faster than S waves. S waves shake particles at right angles to the waves’ direction of travel. S waves travel more slowly than P waves. S waves can travel through solids, but not liquids. Surface waves travel more slowly than body waves. Surface waves move up-and-down as well as side-to-side surface waves are the most destructive seismic waves. Surface waves are usually much larger than body waves. Which types of waves travel the fastest? slowest? and P waves are the fastest. S waves are the second. Surface waves are the slowest. Works cited page http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/kids/images/fault_labeled.gif image http://www.manataka.org/images/Earthquakes.jpg image http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/002/cache/kobe-house-collapse_262_600x450.jpg image http://www.manataka.org/images/Earthquakes.jpg http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/002/cache/kobe-house-collapse_262_600x450.jpg http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/kids/images/fault_labeled.gif P waves S waves Surface waves http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Y-62Ti5_6s. Video Youtube All information gotten from Earth Science course. Faults are fractures in Earth where movement has occurred. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Y-62Ti5_6s. Describe how scientists measure the
strength
of earthquakes. A seismograph produces a time record of ground motion, called a seismogram, during an earthquake. a seismograph can consist of a weight suspended from a support attached to bedrock. When seismic waves reach the seismograph, the inertia of the weight keeps it almost stationary while Earth and the support apparatus vibrate. Chase Newell Cn5546@viedu.org
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