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Hamlet Fever Chart

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Michelle Cristi

on 12 November 2013

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Transcript of Hamlet Fever Chart

Hamlet Fever Chart
Themes & Motifs
By: Michelle Cristi
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Sincerity
Sarcasm
Insane
Sane
Horatio says ’tis but our fantasy
And will not let belief take hold of him
Touching this dreaded sight twice seen of us.
Therefore I have entreated him along
With us to watch the minutes of this night,
That if again this apparition come
He may approve our eyes and speak to it.


Tush, tush, 'twill not appear.
Marcellus
Horatio
Act I Scene 1 Lines 32-39
Mad
Crazy
Stable
Unstable
Deranged
Unbalanced
Rational
Sensible
Ironic
Direct
Cynical
Acerbic
Genuine
Truthful
Indirect
Oblique
Here Marcellus and Bernardo are talking about the first sight of the ghost. Horatio doesn't believe in the ghost existing and claims that it is just a fantasy. Marcellus and Bernardo are being sincere in their words, but Horatio insists that it is pure rubbish.
But now, my cousin Hamlet, and my son-


[aside] A little more than kin, and less than kind!
Claudius
Hamlet
Act I Scene 1 Lines 32-39
Act I Scene 2 Lines 266-267
Act I Scene 2 Lines 266-267
Claudius is asking Hamlet what is wrong. He refers to Hamlet as his son. Realistically Claudius is Hamlet's step father, but also Hamlet's uncle. There is a clear sarcastic tone (although he does know what he is talking about) when referring to Claudius as "more than kin"
Act V
Act I Scene 2 Lines 321-323
Let not thy mother lose her prayers, Hamlet.
I pray thee stay with us, go not to Wittenberg.


I shall in all my best obey you, madam.

Gerturde
Hamlet
Act I Scene 2 Lines 266-267
Gertrude is talking to Hamlet and telling him not be to gloomy about his father's (her ex-husbands) death. Hamlet has a desire to leave for Wittenburg but his mother will not let him. He decides to stay, ending with a sarcastic"I shall in all my best obey you, madam." Basically meaning "I'll obey... but I won't like it"
Hamlet's Sanity/ Insanity
Sarcasm vs. Sincerity

For Hamlet and the trifling of his favor,
Hold it a fashion and a toy in blood,
A violet in the youth of primy nature,
Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting,
The perfume and suppliance of a minute.
No more.
Act I Scene 3 Lines 486-492
Laertes
Act I Scene 3 Lines 486-492
Laertes cares about Ophelia a lot. He doesn't want her getting hurt - he forewarns her that Hamlet is not well suited for her, that he doesn't actually love her. Ophelia is unwilling to listen. Laertes statement about Hamlet may can either be of brotherly care/ or of opinion for Hamlet.
Marry, I’ll teach you. Think yourself a baby
That you have ta'en these tenders for true pay,
Which are not sterling. Tender yourself more dearly,
Or—not to crack the wind of the poor phrase,
Running it thus—you’ll tender me a fool.
Polonuis
Act I Scene 3 Lines 591- 596
Act I Scene 3 Lines 591-596
Polonius is telling Ophelia to beware of Hamlet as well. He warns her that she will make a fool of him if she doesn't protect herself. Polonius is very serious about his opinion on Hamlet and is very direct with what should be her intentions.
Act I Scene 4 Lines 633- 639
[A flourish of trumpets, and two pieces go off.]


What does this mean, my lord?


The king doth wake tonight and takes his rouse,
Keeps wassail and the swaggering upspring reels,
And, as he drains his draughts of Rhenish down,
The kettle-drum and trumpet thus bray out
The triumph of his pledge.
Horatio
Hamlet
Horatio and Hamlet are ghost hunting at this point. There are other events going around them and they are conversing about what is going on. Hamlet explains that it is the kings tradition to get drunk and shoot canons.
Act I Scene 4 Lines 633- 639
O my prophetic soul!
My uncle?


Ay, that incestuous, that adulterate beast,
With witchcraft of his wit, with traitorous gifts-
O wicked wit and gifts, that have the power
So to seduce!- won to his shameful lust
The will of my most seeming-virtuous queen.

Act I Scene 4 Lines 633- 639
Hamlet
Father's Ghost
"Seemingly virtuous" - What is the ghost saying here? He's saying that his why seemed virtuous implying that he has been misled, right? At the point the ghost shows a bitter/ sour tone of what is going on.
Act I Scene 5 Lines 779- 784
Act 2 Scene 1 Lines 1038- 1044
Both your Majesties
Might, by the sovereign power you have of us,
Put your dread pleasures more into command
Than to entreaty.


But we both obey,
And here give up ourselves, in the full bent,
To lay our service freely at your feet,
To be commanded.

Pale as his shirt, his knees knocking each other,
And with a look so piteous in purport
As if he had been loosed out of hell 1040
To speak of horrors- he comes before me.


Mad for thy love?


My lord, I do not know,
But truly I do fear it.
Polonius
Rosencrantz
Ophelia
Ophelia
Guildernstein
Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1110- 1117
Isn't it kind of funny how Ophelia seems to care for much for Hamlet's state of being, and all Polonuis seemed to care about was if he was in love with her ot not?
Act 2 Scene 1 Lines 1038- 1044
Rosencrantz was trying to make a point - that they were both working for the sake of working for the king & queen. Guildernstein was interested in what was being offered by the King and Queen.
Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1110- 1117
But how hath she
Receiv'd his love?


What do you think of me?

Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1225- 1227
Claudius
Polonuis
At the point, Claudius was curious as to what feeling Ophelia has held for Hamlet. Polonuis replies with "What do you think of me?" Polonuis only seems to care about his reputation regarding his daughter.
Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1225- 1227

For if the sun breed maggots in a dead dog, being a god kissing carrion- Have you a daughter?


I have, my lord.


Let her not walk i' th' sun. Conception is a blessing, but not as your daughter may conceive. Friend, look to't.
Polonuis
Hamlet
Hamlet
Hamlet doesn't seem to like Polonius very well. He is insulting him when he calls him a fish monger, and insults his daughter in above quote. (Does he know that his daughter is Ophelia?) Is Hamlet still hurt upon the break up or just doesn't like Polonius?
Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1286- 1290
Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1286- 1290
Slanders, sir; for the satirical rogue says here that old men
have grey beards; that their faces are wrinkled; their eyes
purging thick amber and plum-tree gum; and that they have a
plentiful lack of wit, together with most weak hams. All which,
sir, though I most powerfully and potently believe, yet I hold it
not honesty to have it thus set down; for you yourself, sir,
should be old as I am if, like a crab, you could go backward.

Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1300- 1306
Hamlet
Hamlet seems to be directly insulting Polonius, saying that those with grey beards, and wrinkles lack wisdom.
"for yourself, sir, should be old as I am, if like a crab you could go backward. " Could he travel back in time to be as old (young) as Hamlet?
Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1300- 1306
Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1300- 1306
I will tell you why. So shall my anticipation prevent your
discovery, and your secrecy to the King and Queen moult no
feather. I have of late- but wherefore I know not- lost all my
mirth, forgone all custom of exercises; and indeed, it goes so
heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth,
seems to me a sterile promontory;
Hamlet caught onto their little scheme for the King and Queen. He practically tells them that he is crazy. It is questionable whether he is crazy for admitting this? Or he actually knows what he's doing?
Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1300- 1306
To be, or not to be- that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them. To die- to sleep-
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks;
That flesh is heir to. 'Tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die- to sleep.
To sleep- perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub!

Act 3 Scene 1 Lines 1750- 1758
Hamlet
Hamlet
Hamlet is very sincere with his own feelings. He doesn't express any sarcasm/ acting in this quote. He is all by himself, so you can really connect with him and his real emotions.
Act 3 Scene 1 Lines 1750- 1758
Act 3 Scene 1 Lines 1805- 1810


Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner transform 1805
honesty from what it is to a bawd than the force of honesty can
translate beauty into his likeness. This was sometime a paradox,
but now the time gives it proof. I did love you once.


Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.


You should not have believ'd me; for virtue cannot so 1810
inoculate our old stock but we shall relish of it. I loved you
not.

Hamlet
Hamlet
Ophelia
What? Hamlet never loved Ophelia? That doesn't sound right. Hamlet is stating here that Ophelia shouldn't have believed in Hamlet's love for her.
Then why did Hamlet ever love her?
Act 3 Scene 1 Lines 1805- 1810
Love? his affections do not that way tend;
Nor what he spake, though it lack'd form a little,
Was not like madness. There's something in his soul
O'er which his melancholy sits on brood;
Act 3 Scene 1 Lines 1854- 1855
Claudius
Claudius doesn't want to believe that love is what is driving Hamlet mad. It seems he believes in another reason... such as a murder of a loved one (his father).
Does Claudius know that Hamlet has knowledge of the murder?
Act 3 Scene 1 Lines 1854- 1855
Come hither, my dear Hamlet, sit by me.


No, good mother. Here's metal more attractive.

Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 1989- 1990
Did Hamlet just indirectly insult his mother? Did he just directly compliment Ophelia? It would seem so, but didn't Hamlet also claimed to have never loved her?
Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 1989- 1990
Gertrude
Hamlet
Lady, shall I lie in your lap?
[Sits down at Ophelia's feet.]

No, my lord.

I mean, my head upon your lap?1995

Ay, my lord.

Do you think I meant country matters?

I think nothing, my lord.

That's a fair thought to lie between maids' legs.

Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 1992- 1999
Hamlet
Hamlet
Hamlet
Hamlet
Ophelia
Ophelia
Ophelia
Now the sexual jokes come into the picture. Ophelia doesn't seem to understand them. It seems that Hamlet is pursing her again (literally), but Ophelia just isn't getting it.
Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 1992- 1999
What do you call the play?


'The Mousetrap.' Marry, how? Tropically. This play is the
image of a murther done in Vienna. Gonzago is the duke's name;
his wife, Baptista. You shall see anon. 'Tis a knavish piece of
work; but what o' that? Your Majesty, and we that have free
souls, it touches us not. Let the gall'd jade winch; our withers
are unwrung.

Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 2130- 2136
Hamlet
Claudius
Now the sexual jokes come into the picture. Ophelia doesn't seem to understand them. It seems that Hamlet is pursing her again (literally), but Ophelia just isn't getting it.
Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 2130- 2136
He poisons him i' th' garden for's estate. His name's Gonzago.
The story is extant, and written in very choice Italian. You
shall see anon how the murtherer gets the love of Gonzago's wife.

The King rises.

What, frighted with false fire?
Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 2140- 2153
Hamlet
Hamlet
Ophelia
After the climax of the play when the poison is poured (aka the murder) the King is found to be extremely upset. Hamlet exclaims "What, frighted with false fire?" meaning something along the lines of "Don't be upset... It's not real."
Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 2140- 2153
[rises] My words fly up, my thoughts remain below.
Words without thoughts never to heaven go. Exit.
Act 3 Scene 3 Lines 2380- 2381
Claudius
This is after Claudius was praying and Hamlet had overheard. Hamlet didn't have the will to send Claudius to heaven (killing him right after repentance) but these last words indicate that his prayer wouldn't have mattered anyway.
Act 3 Scene 4 Lines 2380- 2381
Sarcasm vs. Sincerity
Hamlet's Sanity/ Insanity
Hamlet, thou hast thy father much offended.

Mother, you have my father much offended.
Act 3 Scene 4 Lines 2393- 2394
Gertrude is speaking for Claudius for he feels insulted by Hamlet's play. Hamlet retaliates by convicting her of her offense to Hamlet Sr. "You have my father much offended" meaning something along the lines of "you've insulted my father."
Act 4 Scene 1 Lines 2393- 2394
Mad as the sea and wind when both contend
Which is the mightier. In his lawless fit
Behind the arras hearing something stir, 2635
Whips out his rapier, cries 'A rat, a rat!'
And in this brainish apprehension kills
The unseen good old man.

O heavy deed!
It had been so with us, had we been there.
Gertrude
Hamlet
Gertrude
Claudius
Gertrude is telling Claudius what exactly happened in the room with Hamlet. Claudius doesn't seem to care about Polonius' death but is more glad that it wasn't him.
"It had been so with us, had we been there..."
Act 4 Scene 1 Lines 2393- 2394
Act 4 Scene 1 Lines 2633- 2640
He will stay till you come.
Hamlet
Hamlet is making a joke here. Claudius and others are demanding to know where to body and when Hamlet finially gives it's location then go. What Hamlet is really saying is "Don't worry... It's not going anywhere."
Act 4 Scene 3 Lines 2749
Act 4 Scene 3 Lines 2749
How came he dead? I'll not be juggled with:
To hell, allegiance! vows, to the blackest devil
Conscience and grace, to the profoundest pit!
I dare damnation. To this point I stand,
That both the world, I give to negligence,
Let come what comes; only I'll be reveng'd
Most throughly for my father.
Act 4 Scene 5 Lines 3002 - 3008
The tone here became very serious. Of course Laertes wants to avenge his father despite any alliances made. He doesn't seem exactly sane. He wants revenge, but no sure where to go with it.
Act 4 Scene 5 Lines 3002 - 3008
Laertes
Act 4 Scene 7 Lines 3269-3271
Hamlet comes back. What would you undertake
To show yourself your father's son in deed
More than in words?

To cut his throat i' th' church!
Claudius
Laertes
Laertes wants revenge for sure, and Claudius just seems to want Hamlet dead. At this point they are working together to devise a scheme. Laertes seems crazy.
Act 4 Scene 7 Lines 3269-3271
I lov'd Ophelia. Forty thousand brothers
Could not (with all their quantity of love)
Make up my sum. What wilt thou do for her? 3615

Hamlet
Hamlet soon finds out of Opheila's death. He claims to have loved her more that forty thousand could. Later he states irrational things he would've done for Ophelia "Woo't drink up esill? eat a crocodile? I'll do't." (IV.i.3613-3615)
Act 5 Scene 1 Lines 3613-3615
Act 5 Scene 1 Lines 3613-3615
You are not ignorant of what excellence Laertes is-

I dare not confess that, lest I should compare with him in
excellence; but to know a man well were to know himself.
Osric
Hamlet
Act 5 Scene 2 Lines 3783-3786
Here Osric is talking to Hamlet about Laertes and a battle. Osric is trying to make Laertes sound so great, while as Hamlet believes otherwise.
Act 5 Scene 2 Lines 3783-3786
If it assume my noble father's person,
I'll speak to it, though hell itself should gape
And bid me hold my peace. I pray you all, 465
If you have hitherto conceal'd this sight,
Let it be tenable in your silence still;
And whatsoever else shall hap to-night,
Give it an understanding but no tongue.
I will requite your loves. So, fare you well. 470
Upon the platform, 'twixt eleven and twelve,
I'll visit you.
Act I Scene 2 Lines 463-472
Hamlet has just heard of a ghost that could possibly be his father. He bids to speak with it. At this point, Hamlet is completely sane and has complete knowledge of what he is doing.
Act I Scene 2 Lines 463-472
Hamlet
Why, what should be the fear?
I do not set my life at a pin's fee;
And for my soul, what can it do to that,
Being a thing immortal as itself? 700
It waves me forth again. I'll follow it.
Act I Scene 4 Lines 697 - 701
Act I Scene 4 Lines 697 - 701
Hamlet has lost value for his life - so he doesn't seem to care if this ghost were to lead him to death or not. Hamlet seems to know what he is doing - and is completely sane, but I feel as if he is being reckless with his decision.
Rest, rest, perturbed spirit! So, gentlemen,
With all my love I do commend me to you;
And what so poor a man as Hamlet is
May do t' express his love and friending to you, 940
God willing, shall not lack. Let us go in together;
And still your fingers on your lips, I pray.
The time is out of joint. O cursed spite
That ever I was born to set it right!
Nay, come, let's go together.
Hamlet
Hamlet
Act I Scene 5 Lines 937 - 945
Act I Scene 5 Lines 937 - 945
Right before this quote above - Hamlet was frantically trying to get his friends to swear upon his sword that they will speak nothing of what they say. This may be the part of the story he start to go crazy ~
Act I
Act 2 Scene 1 Lines 937 - 945
He took me by the wrist and held me hard;
Then goes he to the length of all his arm,
And, with his other hand thus o'er his brow,
He falls to such perusal of my face
As he would draw it. Long stay'd he so.
Ophelia
Act 2 Scene Lines 937 - 945
Ophelia is concerned for Hamlet. Recently he has been acting weird around her. Ophelia doesn't know what to make of it. Polonius thinks that it was Ophelia's breakup that led to his madness.

We are unsure of Hamlet's mental state at this point.
Act 2 Scene 2 Lines 1316 - 1318
You cannot, sir, take from me anything that I will more
willingly part withal- except my life, except my life, except my
life,
Hamlet
Act 2 Scene 1 Lines 1316 - 1318
Hamlet seems to have no value for his life anymore. His tone and emphasis on "except my life..." He seems to have wished for death at yet MIGHT defend it if needed be. His tone expresses a seeming desire for death.
Act 3 Scene 1 Lines 1805- 1810


Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner transform 1805
honesty from what it is to a bawd than the force of honesty can
translate beauty into his likeness. This was sometime a paradox,
but now the time gives it proof. I did love you once.


Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.


You should not have believ'd me; for virtue cannot so 1810
inoculate our old stock but we shall relish of it. I loved you
not.

Hamlet
Hamlet
Ophelia
Here Hamlet seems to be indirectly insulting Ophelia, and telling her that he never loved her.
(spoiler) Hamlet eventually admits he's always loved her. He is probably just hurt over the breakup and that is why he is acting strange.
Act 3 Scene 1 Lines 1805- 1810
O God, your only jig-maker! What should a man do but be merry? 2005
For look you how cheerfully my mother looks, and my father died
within 's two hours.
Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 2005- 2007
Hamlet
Hamlet is making indirect comment about his mother to Ophelia. He is basically comparing to how happy she being married within two months of her husbands death.
Act 3 Scene 2 Lines 2005- 2007
When he is fit and seasoned for his passage?
No. 2370
Up, sword, and know thou a more horrid hent.
When he is drunk asleep; or in his rage;
Or in th' incestuous pleasure of his bed;
At gaming, swearing, or about some act
That has no relish of salvation in't-
Act 3 Scene 3 Lines 2369- 2375
Hamlet
Hamlet is making a decision of whether to kill Polonius or not. He is rational about the decision he makes and he is careful not to send Polonius to heaven.
Act 3 Scene 3 Lines 2369- 2375
[draws] How now? a rat? Dead for a ducat, dead!

[Makes a pass through the arras and] kills Polonius.
Hamlet
Hamlet seems to be over reacting to a "rat" in the room. Perhaps he had hoped it was Claudius being sneaky (enough to be sent to hell) or Hamlet had just over reacted
Act 3 Scene 4 Lines 2411- 2412
Act 3 Scene 4 Lines 2411- 2412
Act II
Act III
That I can keep your counsel, and not mine own. Besides, to be
demanded of a sponge, what replication should be made by the son
of a king? 2690

Act 4 Scene 2 Lines 2688- 2690
Hamlet is comparing Rosencrantz to a sponge! Rosencrantz in unsure what Hamlet means - but it is making sound crazier than he is already acting.
Act 4 Scene 2 Lines 2688- 2690
Not where he eats, but where he is eaten. A certain
convocation of politic worms are e'en at him. Your worm is your
only emperor for diet. We fat all creatures else to fat us, and
we fat ourselves for maggots. Your fat king and your lean beggar
is but variable service- two dishes, but to one table. That's the 2735
end.
Act 4 Scene 3 Lines 2731- 2735
Hamlet
Hamlet
What Hamlet is saying is very witty. He doesn't seem that crazy at all - it at least seems that he is trying to cover himself up for as long as possible, and is tying to sound crazy to cover up even more.
Act 4 Scene 3 Lines 2731- 2735
Act IV
Thou dost lie in't, to be in't and say it is thine. 'Tis for
the dead, not for the quick; therefore thou liest.
As the play is concluding, Hamlet seems to be growing more and more sane. His thoughts made more sense and he was able to say things without other questioning his sanity.
Act 4 Scene 3 Lines 2731- 2735
Hamlet
Act 5 Scene 1 Lines 3464-3465
'Swounds, show me what thou't do.
Woo't weep? woo't fight? woo't fast? woo't tear thyself?
Woo't drink up esill? eat a crocodile? 3620
I'll do't. Dost thou come here to whine?
To outface me with leaping in her grave?
Be buried quick with her, and so will I.
Act 5 Scene 1 Lines 3618-3624
Hamlet has bordered crazy - and sane. He is both crazy in love with Ophelia, but he seems to be making sense now. Others around him refuse to believe so.
Act 5 Scene 1 Lines 3618-3624
Hamlet
You will lose this wager, my lord.


I do not think so. Since he went into France I have been in 3845
continual practice. I shall win at the odds. But thou wouldst not
think how ill all's here about my heart. But it is no matter.
Hamlet
Horatio
Hamlet is pretty confident of what he is getting himself into. Yet he is ill of heart (probably b/c the death of Ophelia. Is it possible that he may be throwing his life away.
Act 5 Scene 2 Lines 3844-3847
Act 5 Scene 2 Lines 3844-3847
Act V
The End
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