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Copy of Personality Traits and Types

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tem sedgwick

on 24 March 2016

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Transcript of Copy of Personality Traits and Types

Presented by Tem J. Sedgwick & Eric J Morrow
Introduction
to MBTI

MBTI dichotomies
Hippocrates c. 370BC Galen c. 190AD

cheerful sanguine
somber melancholic
enthusiastic choleric
calm phlegmatic
Correlation
Isabel Myers 1950s Galen c.190AD David Keirsey 1998

SP sensing-percieving sangine artisan
SJ sensing-juding melancholic guardian
NF intuitive-thinking choleric idealist
NT intuitive- thinking phlegmatic rationalist
Sensing (S) and Intuition (N)
Extraversion (E)
and
Introversion (I)

Based on C. G. Jung’s theory of Psychological Types (photo)

Jung founded Analytical Psychology

Best known contributor to dream analysis
Jung's Theory:

Traits can be traced back all the way to the Ancient Greeks. The first list of the characteristics and traits started out at 4000 words.

We will look at four pairs of opposites—like our right and left hands (also reflected in Jung's "Duality of Man" theory). We all use both sides of each pair, but one is our natural preference.

Jung believed that our preferences do not change—they stay the same over our lifetime.

What changes is how we use our preferences and often the accuracy with which we can measure the preferences.

The confounding variable—environment!
Thinking (T) and Feeling (F)
Common traits
are the traits that you see in the culture, the traits may vary between the different cultures
Cardinal traits
are the most dominant in describing a personality.
Secondary traits
are peripheral, meaning the attitudes of people when in certain situations.
MBTI - early 1900's
There is variation within each type. Type does not measure:
Development
Stress
Trauma
Emotional health
Intelligence
Maturity
Emotions
IQ
Carl Jung
Like handedness, type theory suggests we have hard-wired preferences for the elements of psychological type.
The direction in which we focus our attention and energy
Introduction to Type®, p. 9
People who prefer Extraversion:
Focus their energy and attention outward
Are interested in the world of people and things

People who prefer Introversion:
Focus their energy and attention inward
Are interested in the inner world of thoughts and
reflections

Neither term reflects social competence or ability
We all use both preferences, but usually
not with equal comfort.
When Worlds Collide: Extraverts and Introverts!
Identfy the Extravert and the Introvert:
The way we take in information and the kind of
information we like and trust
Introduction to Type®, p. 9
People who prefer Sensing:
Prefer to take in information using their five senses— sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste


People who prefer Intuition:
Go beyond what is real or concrete and focus on meaning, associations, and relationships

*This impacts how we see the world in which we live - we often experience two completely different worlds!

We all use both ways of perceiving, but we typically prefer and trust one over the other.
When Sensers (S) and Intuitives (N) Collide!
The way we make decisions
Introduction to Type®, p. 10
People who prefer Thinking:
Make their decisions based on impersonal, objective logic

People who prefer Feeling:
Make their decisions with a person-centered, values-based process

Both processes are rational and we use both often, but usually not equally nor easily.
When Thinkers (T) and Feelers (F) attempt to communicate their perspectives - Curse of the Jade Scorpian
Introduction to Type®, p. 10
Judging (J) and Perceiving (P)
Our attitude toward the external world and how we orient ourselves to it
Introduction to Type®, p. 10
People who prefer Judging:
Want the external world to be organized and orderly
Look at the world and see decisions that need to be made


People who prefer Perceiving:
Seek to experience the world, not organize it
Look at the world and see options that need to be explored


We all use both attitudes, but usually not with equal comfort.
Enjoying the benefits of a “free” weekend…
Thinking (T) or Feeling (F)
When Judgers and Perceivers Collide! "Experiencing" the world, vs "Organizing" the world
Sensing (S) or Intuition (N)
Judging (J) or Perceiving (P)
Judging (J) or Perceiving (P)
Extraverts (66%/47%)
(Barb, Rosita, Missy, Joe, Nick, Ron, Celinda, and Heather) are energized by:
The external world of people and things
Interacting wtih others
External processing of information

Speak/think/speak
Introverts (33%/52%)
(Jon, Elaine, Marni, Jamie, Lonnie, Rich, Melissa, Keith and Risha) are energized by:
The internal world of reflection and contemplation
Taking in information or ideas
Spending time alone or with select others
Internal processing of information

Think/speak/think
We can survive/thrive in both worlds, but one will be a more natural fit and the other more quickly draining
Sensers (66%/64%)
(Elaine, Barb, Marni, Missy, Lonnie, Joe, Rich, Melissa, Nick, Keith, and Celinda), pay attention to:
Practical facts
Details
Past and Present
Specifics
Intuitionists (33%/35%)
(Jon, Heather, Rosita, Jamie, Ron, and Risha) pay attention to:
Insights
Patterns of ideas
What could be (future)
The big picture
This dichotomy provides the most frequent conflict within work environments - this is not just the information we attend to, this is also the information we value and how we each see the world!
Thinkers (52%/47%
(Elaine, Lonnie, Joe, Rich, Melissa, Keith, Heather, and Risha) base decisions on:
Nonpersonal, objective, data ("If this....then that...")
An outcome that "makes sense"
An ideal of fairness that is universal
Feelers (48%/52%)
(Jon, Barb, Rosita, Marni, Jamie, Missy, Nick, Ron, and Celinda) make decisions on:
Subjective values that center on people
Information that includes impact on people
A harmonious outcome that "feels right"
An ideal of fairness that treats every individual uniquely
Conflict frequently occurs around these decisions
when we don't understand, or devalue, other's
decision making processes
Judgers (55%/82%)
(Elaine, Rosita, Marni, Jamie, Missy, Lonnie, Heather, Joe, Rich, Melissa, Nick, Keith, Ron, and Risha) preferred operating style is:
Organized
Planned
Oriented towards goals and results

They like to "wrap it up" and enjoy decisions and closure
Perceivers (45%/17%)
(Jon, Barb, and Celinda) preferred operating style is:
Flexible
Spontaneous
Oriented towards gathering more information

They like to "process new information" and enjoy space/time to gather information.
Known as the "roommate dichotomy", as this frequently manifests itself in frustration over living conditions. How do you see this manifested in your work?
Developed by Isabel Briggs Myers and her mother, Katharine Briggs (photo)
Myers led development of the MBTI assessment over a 50 year period
Cognitive model concerned with hard-wired preferences for gathering information (Perceiving) and making decisions (Judging)
Preferences are innate and do not change over time
Extensive validity and reliability research done
MBTI - 1930's to 1970's
Goals
Learn to better understand ourselves
Learn to better understand those with whom we work
Learn to better understand the role our personality types play
YOU are the best expert on your personality type
The results from the instrument can be influenced by:
Environment
Family/social/cultural influences
Stress
Work vs Personal space
There are no "good" or "bad" types; all types have some natural strengths and all type have some natural blind spots
Use of the MBTI
Over 60% of the Fortune 100 Companies
Administered to over 2 million people each year
Translated into more than 30 languages
Used in more than 70 different countries
Most widely used, and most thoroughly researched personality instrument in the world

Handwriting exercise
Describe Confict
and
Your Reaction to it…
Myers Briggs Personality Inventory
SUES
January 28, 2015
Who are we?
TONOPAH
Franceska Larson - ESFJ
Michael Hedden - INTJ
Maryssa Nagata - ?
Lindsey Paige - ENFJ
Emily Schroeder - ISFJ
Samantha Ferido - INFJ
Alicia Foote - INFJ
Mikala Pike - ESFJ
Jacque Puno - ISFJ
Tim Schultz - ESFJ
Orlando - INTJ
Overall, good team balance
No representation of Perceivers
Holly Schlotzhauer - ESFP
Desiree Tupas - ENFJ
Joseph Matter - ENTJ
Bridgett mcLean - ENFJ
Shannon McWhinnie - ENFJ
Rebekah Rivera - INFJ
We tend to assume unconsciously that the minds of others operate similarly to our own.

However, frequently, others do not see the world as we see the world, do not reason as we reason, do not value what we value, and are not interested in the things in which we are interested.

So...
Learning about personality type allows us to be better prepared when we encounter people who experience the world differently than us.

Learning about personality type also helps us understand that we can expect specific differences in specific people and to cope with these differences better than we otherwise might.
Extraverts 66% Introvert 33%
Sensing 66% Intuitive 33%
Thinking 52%

Feeling 48%

Female 40 %

Female 60 %

Male 67 % Male 33 %
Judging 55% Perceiving 45%
What gives you energy?
What saps your energy?
What information do you prefer?
What information do you trust?
How do you see the world?
Do you process externally or internally?
How do you make decisions?
What do you think is "fair"?
Objective data or personal values?
"The roommate dichotomy"
Scheduled or flexible?
Decisions or options?
Alli L - INFJ
UCC:
Rachael Bruni - ESFJ
Kristin Tait - INTJ
Ryan Henning - ENFP
Larissa Stang - ENFJ
Nicole Reynolds - ENFJ
Alexandra Knowlton - INFJ
Cortney Mancini - ISTJ
Daniel Erosa - ?
Caitlin - INTP
SOUTH:
Alexander Miller - ESFJ
Kelly Dorin - INFJ
Jordyn Hay - ENFJ
Eboni Finley - ESTJ
Kyle Pointer - ENTJ
Carlos Navarro - ENTJ
Korey Lopez - INFP
Under represented in Sensors
and Perceivers
Dayton
US
ENFJ
2.5%/11%
Ron
Rosita
INFJ
1.46%/5.8%
Jamie

ESFJ
12.3%/11.5%
Missy
Nick
ENTJ
1.8%/5.8%
Heather
ISFJ
13.8%/7.5%
Alexandria Daniels
Emily Schroeder
Jacki Puno
INFP
4.4%/5%
K
orey Lopez
Orlando T. White
INTJ
2.1%/5%
Kristin Tait
Mike Hedden
INTP
3.3%/5%
Caitlin C. Clark
Tem J. Sedgwick
ESTJ
8.7%/5%
Kris Holland
Eboni Finley
ENFP
8.1%/5%
Ryan Henning
Kevin McVey
ISTJ
11.6%/2.5%
Cortney Mancini
ESFP
8.5%/2.5%
Holly Scholtzhauer
ESTP 4.3%/0%ENTP 3.2%/0%ISTP 5.4%/0%ISFP 8.8%/0%
Kyle Broyard - ENTJ
Alesandria Daniels - ISFJ
Debra Farmer - ?
Kevin McVay - ENFP
Cassandra O'Toole - ENTJ
Kris Holland - ESTJ
DaytonStrongly under represented in Introverts and Perceivers
Who are we?
Is our collective typology reflective
of national norms?
Significantly overrepresented in:
ENFJ
INFJ
ENTJ
Significantly underrepresented in:
ISTJ
ESFP
ESFP
8.5%/11.5%
Barb
Celinda
INFP
4.4%/5.8%
Jon
ISTJ
11.6%/29.4%
Elaine
Lonnie
Rich
Melissa
Keith
ISFJ
1.8%/5.8%
Marni
ESTJ
1.8%/5.8%
Joe
INTJ
2.1%/5.8%
Risha
Not in group:
ISTP
ISFP
INTP
ESTP
ENFP
ENTP
Over represented in Judging function
Slight over representation in Feeling function
Full transcript