Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

IGCSE English Literature (0486): Short Stories Revision

Last-minute revision. Signalman, Yellow Wallpaper, How It Happened, There Will Come Soft Rains, Meteor, Lemon Orchard...
by

Ruru (Juan Ru) Hoong

on 23 February 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of IGCSE English Literature (0486): Short Stories Revision

photo credit Nasa / Goddard Space Flight Center / Reto Stöckli by Ruru H. IGCSE English Literature (0486)

Stories of Ourselves The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman It felt like 'utter prostration' and there were 'ceaseless tears' in 'unbearable inner misery.

The Yellow Wallpaper is a story depicting the unfortunate misery and depression women often went through during the Victorian age- the mistreatment of women and their subordination. This spine-chilling horror story is based on Gilman's own experience with post-natal depression and clearly portrays women as a subdued gender under a hegemonic patriarchal rule. Rhetorical questions:
Full of questions: 'else, why should it be let so cheaply?'
Hinting at post-natal depression, indication of paranoia
Look into overtly imaginative and unstable mind
Sense something is amiss in the house
Foreshadowing
Doesn't address anything else on the topic: adds mystery, suspense, and tension
'And what can one do?'
Helpless, desperate for guidance
Indication of mental illness that husband is adamant to cure
Indignant by his attitude and the way he treats her
Language Exclamation marks:
Varying numbers at start of story: first glimmers of mental illness: ‘You see, he does not believe I am sick!’
Disbelief: reveals the callous way men treated women
Frustrated: feels constrained, misunderstood, she knows better
Climax: Punctuation increases, more and more excited, hysterical
‘But I am here, and no one touches this paper but me- not alive!’:Affecting her sanity, becomes enraptured: emotions affected→ keeps readers on edge
Maniacal: locks her husband out ‘Why, there’s John at the door! It’s no use, young man, you can’t open it!’
Locks him out during inexplicably confusing and traumatizing finale: shows she wants to be in control
John locked her in for a long time- did not understand her need for different care: she needed space to breathe- but John’s all-encompassing authority & patronizing, clinical, rational manner only aggravated it
‘So I had to creep over him every time!’
Final exclamation mark adds a level of finality to her madness
Shows that the situation has escalated to such an unfortunate extent Structure Repetition of ‘creep’
Women have to creep, try to remain unnoticed and avoid being heard
Something to hide, something sinister and mysterious, quite terrifying
What women had to do in those days: be inconspicuous: feminism
Although at the end she crept freely, it is apparent that she is not in possession of freedom at all: creeping on legs and arms is a symbol of servitude The Signalman by Charles Dickens The Signalman is a Victorian ghost story partly based on Dickens' own experience of a fatal train crash that explores supernatural themes with a contemporary touch (railways were a cutting-edge technology in the 1860s), making it an unknown, uncertain, and altogether unexpected story. Rhetorical questions:
Full of questions: 'else, why should it be let so cheaply?'
Hinting at post-natal depression, indication of paranoia
Look into overtly imaginative and unstable mind
Sense something is amiss in the house
Foreshadowing
Doesn't address anything else on the topic: adds mystery, suspense, and tension
'And what can one do?'
Helpless, desperate for guidance
Indication of mental illness that husband is adamant to cure
Indignant by his attitude and the way he treats her Language Exclamation marks:
Varying numbers at start of story: first glimmers of mental illness: ‘You see, he does not believe I am sick!’
Disbelief: reveals the callous way men treated women
Frustrated: feels constrained, misunderstood, she knows better
Climax: Punctuation increases, more and more excited, hysterical
‘But I am here, and no one touches this paper but me- not alive!’:Affecting her sanity, becomes enraptured: emotions affected→ keeps readers on edge
Maniacal: locks her husband out ‘Why, there’s John at the door! It’s no use, young man, you can’t open it!’
Locks him out during inexplicably confusing and traumatizing finale: shows she wants to be in control
John locked her in for a long time- did not understand her need for different care: she needed space to breathe- but John’s all-encompassing authority & patronizing, clinical, rational manner only aggravated it
‘So I had to creep over him every time!’
Final exclamation mark adds a level of finality to her madness
Shows that the situation has escalated to such an unfortunate extent Structure Repetition of ‘creep’
Women have to creep, try to remain unnoticed and avoid being heard
Something to hide, something sinister and mysterious, quite terrifying
What women had to do in those days: be inconspicuous: feminism
Although at the end she crept freely, it is apparent that she is not in possession of freedom at all: creeping on legs and arms is a symbol of servitude
Full transcript