Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Healthy people 2020 Hearing and Other Sensory Communication Disorders

No description
by

Laura Butz

on 5 November 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Healthy people 2020 Hearing and Other Sensory Communication Disorders

Objective 11
Increase the proportion of adults with balance or dizziness problems in the past 12 months who have ever seen a health care provider about their balance or dizziness problems Balance and Dizziness Objective 19
(Developmental) Increase the proportion of persons with communication disorders of voice, swallowing, speech, or language who have seen a speech-language pathologist (SLP) for evaluation or treatment Voice, Speech, and Language Objective 1
Increase the proportion of newborns who are screened for hearing loss by no later than age 1 month, have audiologic evaluation by age 3 months, and are enrolled in appropriate intervention services no later than age 6 months Newborn Hearing Screening Objective 3
Increase the proportion of persons with hearing impairments who have ever used a hearing aid or assistive listening devices or who have cochlear implants Hearing Objective 9
Increase the proportion of adults bothered by tinnitus who have seen a doctor or other health care professionals Tinnitus (Ringing in the Ears or Head) Goal: Reduce the prevalence and severity of hearing and balance; smell and taste; and voice, speech, and language for people of all ages Objective 16
(Developmental) Increase the proportion of adults with chemosensory (smell or taste) disorders who have seen a health care provider about their disorder in the past 12 months Smell and Taste (Chemosenses) Objective 2
Decrease otitis media in children and adolesence Ear Infections (Otitis Media) HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020
Hearing and Other Sensory Communication Disorders Quick Facts
Sensory of communication impairments or disorders affect 1 in 6 Americans
These disorders can affect a person mentally and physically and can affect day to day life
Individuals with these disorders may have difficulty at school or work, may feel secluded in social situations, and may have other health problems
1 in 3 of 1,000 children is born with hearing loss
1 out of 110 8-year-olds are affected by autism spectrum diseases which are often linked to speech and language problems
Chemosensory problems can be linked to many diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, malnutrition, diabetes, hyptertension, and obesity
7.5 million people in the U.S. have voice problems
Noise-induced hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance disorders are becoming more frequent due to combat situations
Advances in technology have been of great help to people with communication disorders Factors that Influence Sensory and Communication Disorders
Genetics
Infections
Injuries
Reactions to certain drugs
Unhealthy lifestyle choices
Age of diagnosis and intervention
Personal shame or embarrassment about having a disorder and/or seeking help Current Research
Development of better ear protection devices
Understanding co-occurring conditions; the presence of one disorder may lead to diagnosis and treatment of another
National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
Conduct and support research training on disorders of hearing and other communication processes
Work with other research institutions and organizations to prevent disease and promote health
Communicate their research findings to health professionals and the public Objective 4
Increase the proportion of persons who have had a hearing examination on schedule Objective 5
Increase the number of persons who are referred by their primary care physician or other health care provider for hearing evaluation and treatment Objective 6
Increase the use of hearing protection devices Objective 7
Reduce the proportion of adolescents who have elevated hearing thresholds, or audiometric notches, in high frequencies (3, 4, or 6 kHz) in both ears, signifying noise-induced hearing loss Objective 8
Reduce the proportion of adults who have elevated hearing thresholds, or audiometric notches, in high frequencies (3, 4, or 6 kHz) in both ears, signifying noise-induced hearing loss Objective 10
Increase the proportion of adults for whom tinnitus is a moderate to severe problem who have tried appropriate treatments Objective 12
Increase the proportion of adults with moderate to severe balance or dizziness problems who have seen or been referred to a health care specialist for evaluation or treatment Objective 13
Increase the proportion of persons who have tried recommended methods for treating their balance or dizziness problems Objective 14
Reduce the proportion of adults with balance and dizziness problems who experienced negative or adverse outcomes in the past 12 months Objective 15
Reduce the proportion of adults with balance and dizziness problems who have fallen and been injured Objective 17
(Developmental) Increase the proportion of adults who have tried recommended methods of treating their smell or taste disorders in the past 12 months to improve their condition Objective 18
(Developmental) Reduce the proportion of adults with chemosensory (smell or taste) disorders who as a result have experienced a negative impact on their general health status, work, or quality of life in the past 12 months Objective 20
(Developmental) Increase the proportion of persons with communication disorders of voice, swallowing, speech, or language who have participated in rehabilitation services Objective 21
(Developmental) Increase the proportion of young children with phonological disorders, language delay, or other developmental language problems who have participated in speech-language or other intervention services Objective 22
(Developmental) Increase the proportion of persons with communication disorders of voice, swallowing, speech, or language in the past 12 months whose personal or social functioning at home, school, or work improved after participation in speech-language therapy or other rehabilitative or intervention services Internet Health Care Resources for ENT-VSL Objective 23
(Developmental) Increase the proportion of persons with hearing loss and other sensory or communication disorders who have used Internet resources for health care information, guidance, or advice in the past 12 months Areas to Improve
Baseline: 80.9 % of adults aged 18 years and older for whom tinnitus is a moderate to severe problem tried appropriate treatments in 2007
Target: 89% Refrences Areas to Improve
Sreening for hearing loss no later than age 1 month
Baseline: 82% of newborns aged 1 month or less had screenings for hearing loss in 2007
Goal: 90.2%
Receipt of audiologic evaluation no later than age 3 months for infants who did not pass the hearing screening
Baseline: 66% of infants aged 3 months and under who did not pass the hearing screening received audiologic evaluation in 2007
Goal: 72.6%
Enrollment of infants with confirmed hearing loss for intervention services no later than age 6 month
Baseline: 50% of infants aged 6 months and under with confirmed hearing loss were enrolled in intervention services in 2007
Goal: 55% Current Problems
Hearing screenings are routine at hospitals for newborns but follow-ups do not always occur
The move from inpatient hospital screening to outpatient diagnosis may be responsible for some infants getting lost in the system
Most hospitals are required to report results of newborn screenings, but when an infant is discharged from the hospital, information gets lost
If patients do make it to an audiologist, most states do not require audiologists to report diagnostic test results so it is difficult to confirm if a child really does have a problem Implications and Interventions
Have better communication among the hospital, primary care physician, audiologist, and parents
Bring parents into screenings so they can see what is going on and witness their child's problem themselves
Have an increase in reviewing loss-to-follow-up and loss-to-documentation data in order to focus in or problem areas
Get parents of newly diagnosed children in contact with other parents who have children with hearing problems so that they have someone to turn to for help and guidance
Have more hospitals develop scripts for nurses and hospital staff to use when speaking to parents about the importance of scheduling an audiologic exam
Currently
The National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality is helping states apply quality improvement methods to boost rates of documented follow-up and intervention
The Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau is working now to expand pediatric training Areas to Improve
Reduce the proportion of adults with balance and dizziness problems who have fallen in the past 5 years while experiencing symptoms of dizziness, vertigo, or imbalance
Current: 55.6 % of adults aged 18 or older fell in the past 5 years while experiencing symptoms in 2008
Goal: 50.0 %
Reduce the proportion of adults with balance and dizziness problems who have been injured as a result of a fall for any reason in the past 12 months
Current: 41.7 % of adults aged 18 or older with balance and dizziness problems were injured as a result of a fall in 2008
Goal: 37.5 % Background
Imbalance-feeling unsteady or dizzy, caused by certain health conditions, medications, or problems in inner ear
Vertigo-a feeling of faintness or feeling as if you’ve lost balance, results from sudden or temporary change in activity of the balance structures in your inner ear Symptoms
Lightheadedness, faintness, or floating sensation
Blurred vision
Confusion/disorientation
Nausea, vomiting, change in heart rate, anxiety
**Doctors must determine if dizziness is caused by a medical condition or medication
**Some people may not be able to fully relieve their dizziness and will have to cope Implications and Interventions
Sufferers of Vertigo can use the Epley Maneuver to relieve feelings of dizziness
Sit upright then quickly lie down on your back, turn your head to one side, and wait for a min or two before sitting back up again
Visiting a doctor can help one gain knowledge on how to avoid feeling symptoms and how to cope with them
Changes in diet-reduce salt, and limiting alcohol and caffeine, no smoking, distributing food and fluid intake evenly throughout the day
Avoid injury
Engage in home-based exercise: low impact aerobics, walking program
Avoid walking in the dark, wear low heeled shoes/walking shoes, use a cane if necessary, inspect handrails at home periodically to make sure they are secure, make modifications to bathroom fixtures, ask doctors opinion on driving
Vestibular rehabilitation therapist can help to develop an individualized plan that combines head, body, and eye exercises to decrease dizziness and increase fitness Background
Tinnitus-ringing, swishing, or other type of noise that seems to originate in the ear or head Causes
Can arise in any part of the ear or from abnormalities in the brain
Fluid, infection, or disease of the middle ear bones or ear drum
Damage to the microscopic endings of the hearing nerve in the inner ear
Aging
Loud noise exposure
Head and neck trauma Treatment
Best way to get individuals with tinnitus to use proper treatments is to get individuals informed about their condition
The American Tinnitus Association website is an excellent source of information
Visiting a doctor can help one to gain knowledge on treatments specific to their condition
Alternative treatments
Amplification-(hearing aids)cochlear implants, electrical stimulation,
Anti-anxiety and anti depression drugs, zinc supplementation
Behavior/cognitive therapies (tinnitus retraining therapy, masking, behavioral therapy)
In order for treatments to be worthwhile, individuals should work to make sure their condition does not worsen by
Reducing or avoiding caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol intake
Wearing ear protection to avoid exposure to loud noises
Relaxation to reduce stress Background
Anomesia: loss of the senses of smell
Aguesia: loss of the senses of taste
**Smelling and tasting occurs when molecules released by the substances around us stimulate special nerve cells (olfactory in nose for smell and gustatory for taste in the taste buds of mouth and throat) transmit messages to the brain
**many people think they have a taste disorder but it is actually a smell disorder Effects on Lifestyle
No stimulation on desire to eat which may lead to malnutrition
Eat too much and gain weight which may lead to obesity
Effect on people with high BP, kidney disease
No pleasure from aromas
Smell and taste warns of dangers (fire, poisonous fumes, and spoiled food)
Effect on social activities, may lead to depression Causes of taste disorders
Upper respiratory and middle ear infections
Radiation therapy for cancers of head and neck
Exposure to certain chemicals
Head injury
Surgeries (ex: wisdom tooth extraction)
Poor oral hygiene and dental problems
Cigarette smoking
Causes of smell disorders
Sinus infections
Polyps on the nasal cavities
Frontal head injuries
Hormonal disturbances
Dental problems
Exposure to certain chemicals
Medications
Radiation associated with treating head and neck cancers
Aging
Issues that affect nervous system (Parkinson's or Alzheimer's) Treatment
Depends on
Overall age, health, and history
Extent
Tolerance for medications and procedures
Surgical removal of obstructions
Visit a doctor for suggestions American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. (2012). Smell & Taste. Retrieved from http://www.entnet.org/HealthInformation/smellTaste.cfm
Cunha, J. P. (2011, January 21). Tinnitus. Medicinenet. Retrieved from http://www.medicinenet.com/tinnitus/page3.htm
(2) Devore, P.A. (1992). Prevalance of Olifactory Dysfunciton, Hearing Deficit, and Cognitive Dysfunction Among Elderly Patients in a Suburban Family Practice. J. South. Med. Assoc., 85, 894-896.
Duffy, V. B., Backstrand, J. R., & Ferris, A. M. (1995). Olfactory dysfunction and related nutritional risk in free-living elderly women. Journal of American Dietetic Association, 95(8), 879-885.
(1) Mattis, R.D. (1995). Nutritional Implicaitons of Taste and Smell Disorders. In Doty R.L. (ed.), Handbook of Olfaction and Gustation. Marcel Dekker, New York.
National Health Information Center. (2012, September 27). Talk With Your Doctor About Newborn Screening. Retrieved from http://healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/ebr.aspx?topicId=20
National Health Information Center. (2012, October 31). Lower Your Risk of Falling. Retrieved from http://www.healthfinder.gov/prevention/ViewTopic.aspx?topicID=17&cnt=1&areaID=1
National Institutes of Health (NIH). (2012, March 30). National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders - Organization - The NIH Almanac. Retrieved from http://www.nih.gov/about/almanac/organization/NIDCD.htm#director
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. (2009, July). Smell Disorders. Retrieved from http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/smelltaste/pages/smell.aspx#smell_01
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. (2009, December). Balance Disorders. Retrieved from https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/balance/pages/balance_disorders.aspx
Pallarito, Karen. (2012). Breaking News: Quality Improvement Efforts Target Gaps in Newborn Hearing Screening Programs. The Hearing Journal, 65, 9. doi: 10.1097/01.HJ.0000418984.95188.cf
Toller, S. V. (1999). Assessing the Impact of Anosmia: Review of a Questionnaire's Findings. Oxford Journals, 24(6), 705-712.
United States Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2020. (2012, September 6). Hearing and Other Sensory or Communication Disorders-Healthy People. Retrieved from http://healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=20
University of Rochester Medical Center. (2012). Smell and Taste Disorders (Chemosensory Disorders). Retrieved from https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/Encyclopedia/Content.aspxContentTypeID=85&ContentID=P00466
Vestibular Disorders Association. (2012). Treatment. Retrieved from http://vestibular.org/understanding-vestibular-disorder/treatment Statistics
4 million people nationwide suffer from smell disorders
only 1 percent to 2 percent of young people are affected, but a quarter of those over 55 and nearly two-thirds of those over 80 have a diminished sense of smell
In a study done by Mattis (1) 14% of anosmic patients experienced a body weight gain exceeding 10% while 6.5% experienced a loss of at least that amount.
A study by Devore (2) showed that olfactory dysfunction was present in 39% of a sample of the elderly and 18% were unable to detect smoke
Parents do not know the steps of normal childhood development so they do not know if their child differs from the norm
Parents may not realize how urgent following up is
Parents may not have the money or transportation to see an audiologist as there is a lack in pediatric audiologists especially in rural areas
Non-English speakers or people with a lower reading level may not understand the next steps they are supposed to take Lifestyle changes
Identify and record the circumstances surrounding it (ex: exposed to air pollutants?)
Talking with someone/counseling
Prepare food with variety of colors and textures
Use aromatic herbs and hot spices to add more flavor; avoid salt and sugar
Make use of the people you live with (ask them to smell food)
Pay attention to spoiled dates
Install smoke alarms and gas detectors / fire extinguishers
Properly labeling things
Store toxic things in a well ventilated area
Set timers when cooking
Stopping or changing medication
Proper oral hygiene
Smoking cessation
Full transcript