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functionalism and the new right

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amy o'brien

on 4 January 2013

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Transcript of functionalism and the new right

Functionalism and the New Right By Amy, Jess, Olivia, Tooba and Washma Criticisms The New Right see the traditional nuclear family as self-reliant and capable of caring for its members, as it has a division of labour between a ‘male provider’ and ‘female home-maker’. Functionalists see society as built on harmony and consensus (shared values)

They believe that societies policies help families to perform their functions more effectively and make life better for the members. Functionalism Ronald Fletcher (1966) argues that the introduction of health, education and housing policies in the past few years has gradually led to a welfare state It assumes all members of the family benefit from social policies, but feminists argue policies often benefit men and not women. They criticise many existing government policies, arguing that the government often weakens family self-reliance by providing generous benefits Charles Murray (1984) argues these benefits offer ‘perverse incentives’; this means social policies reward anti-social behaviour. they believe social policies encourage a dependency culture where individuals learn to depend on the state to support them and their children

believe the government should cut welfare spending and have tighter restrictions on who is eligible for benefits

they would also encourage the nuclear family by favouring married couples It assumes there is a ‘march of progress', but Marxists argue that policies can also have a negative affect. E.g. cutting benefits Criticisms of The New Right
Feminists argue it is an attempt to justify a return to the traditional patriarchal family.

Wrongly assumes the patriarchal nuclear family is natural.

Cutting benefits would drive poor families into greater poverty.
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