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Brutus The Tragic Hero

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Megan Dearie

on 14 November 2012

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Transcript of Brutus The Tragic Hero

Examples By: Megan Dearie Brutus the Tragic Hero Is Brutus a tragic hero? The Tragic Hero is of Noble Stature and has Greatness The Tragic Hero Has a Tragic Flaw Which Leads to Their Downfall The Hero's Downfall is Their own Fault, the Result of Free Choice. The Punishment Exceeds the Crime Increase in Awareness, Some Gain in Self-Knowledge. Redemption for Character. The Verdict. A tragic hero is a man of noble stature. He is not an ordinary man, but a man with outstanding quality and greatness about him. His own destruction is for a greater cause or principle. "I have heard,
Where many of the best respect in Rome,—
Except immortal Caesar,—speaking of Brutus,
And groaning underneath this age's yoke,
Have wish'd that noble Brutus had his eyes." . - Act I Scene II Cassius's dialogue. More Examples "Well, honour is the subject of my story." - Cassius's Monologue "Well, honour is the subject of my story.
I cannot tell what you and other men
Think of this life; but, for my single self,
I had as lief not be as live to be
In awe of such a thing as I myself.
I was born free as Caesar; so were you:"
- Cassius's Monologue . "That noble minds keep ever with their likes" - Cassius's Soliloquy . "But win the noble Brutus to our party—" -Cinna's Dialogue, Act I Scene II Act I Scene II Act I Scene II Act I Scene I "Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see,
Thy honourable metal may be wrought" - Cassius's Soliloquy, Act I Scene II More Examples "Brutus, my lord!" - Portia, Act II Scene I "And, for Mark Antony, think not of him;
For he can do no more than Caesar's arm
When Caesar's head is off." - Quote from Brutus about the fate of Mark Antony, Act II Scene I "Grant that, and then is death a benefit:
So are we Caesar's friends, that have abridg'd
His time of fearing death. Stoop, Romans,
stoop, And let us bathe our hands in Cæsar's blood Up to the elbows, and besmear our swords:Then walk we forth, even to the market-place;And waving our red weapons o'er our heads, Let's all cry, 'Peace, freedom, and liberty" -Brutus's Dialogue, Act III Scene I "Brutus is noble, wise, valiant, and honest;
Caesar was mighty, bold, royal, and loving:
Say I love Brutus, and I honour him;
Say I fear'd Cæsar, honour'd him, and lov'd
him." -Servant's monologue, Act III Scene I "If then that friend demand why Brutus
rose against Cæsar, this is my answer: Not that
I loved Cæsar less, but that I loved Rome more. " -Brutus's Speech, Act III Scene II More Examples "If then that friend demand why Brutus
rose against Cæsar, this is my answer: Not that I loved Cæsar less, but that I loved Rome more. " -Antony's Speech, Act III Scene I "You wrong me every way; you wrong
me, Brutus;" -Dialogue Between Brutus and Cassius, Act IV Scene I The dialogue above shows that Brutus is on the edge of loosing Cassius's friendship over thYet, countrymen, O! yet hold up your
heads! e bribe and money issue.Yet, countrymen, O! yet hold up your
heads! [He runs on his
sword.] Cæsar, now be still;
I kill'd not thee with half so good a will.[He runs on his
sword.] Cæsar, now be still;
I kill'd not thee with half so good a will.arewell to you; and you; and you,
Volumnius.
Strato, thou hast been all this while asleep;
Farewell to thee too, Strato. Countrymen
My heart doth joy that yet, in all my life,
I found no man but he was true to me. arewell to you; and you; and you,
Volumnius.
Strato, thou hast been all this while asleep;
Farewell to thee too, Strato. Countrymen
My heart doth joy that yet, in all my life,
I found no man but he was true to me. arewell to you; and you; and you,
Volumnius.
Strato, thou hast been all this while asleep;
Farewell to thee too, Strato. Countrymen
My heart doth joy that yet, in all my life,
I found no man but he was true to me. "For ever, and for ever, farewell, Cassius!
If we do meet again, why, we shall smile;
If not, why then, this parting was well made." More Examples -Brutus's Dialogue in Act V Scene I After figuring out they had been captured, the stepped up their game. "Yet, countrymen, O! yet hold up your
heads!" Brutus is telling his men to hold up there heads and be proud of themselves. "[He runs on his sword.] Caesar, now be still; I kill'd not thee with half so good a will." I'm pretty sure by this point, Brutus realizes that what he did was wrong, and after seeing his dear friends die around him, it was the only thing left for him to do. By the end of the play, Brutus kills himself because he realizes his wrong in the situation. He says goodbye to all of his soldiers: Farewell to you; and you; and you,
Volumnius. Strato, thou hast been all this while asleep; Farewell to thee too, Strato. Countrymen My heart doth joy that yet, in all my life, I found no man but he was true to me. Snape is another example of a tragic hero, just like Brutus. He was a man of noble stature and was pretty respected by others. - Tragic Flaw: superstitious attitude -Noble Stature: strong relationship with Harry's parents -Betrayed the Dark Lord -Secretly really cared about Harry I think he is a tragic hero.
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