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Huck Finn

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Spencer Kershaw

on 18 December 2012

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Transcript of Huck Finn

Huckleberry Finn
Chapters: 17-22 Chapter 17(pg. 129) Summary: Themes: Motifs: Huck Finn identifies himself as George Jackson, an orphan who fell off a steamboat to the owners of the dogs who find him. Huck takes this new name due to the fact that many think he is dead, and there is news going around about him and Jim. Huck's hosts are the Grangerfords, a family with a long-standing feud with the Shepherdson family. Huck soon becomes friends with Buck Grangerford, who is close to his age. While looking around the Grangerfords' home, he sees a pile of books on a fancy table. The "Pilgrim's Progress" was mentioned because Mark Twain disliked its ornate style with its sentimental pictures and poems.He then discovers the Grangerfords had a daughter who passed away many years earlier and she was fond of writing "tributes" for the dead. Huck tries to do this also, but realizes he is incapable of doing so. Literary Devices: Chapter 18(pg. 141) Summary: Jim survives the steamboat crash and hides in a nearby swamp in order to fix the raft. The family feud flares up the next day when Sophia Grangerfords and Harney Shepherdson run away together. Buck and his cousin get killed along with Buck's father. Harney and Sophia got across the river safely, escaping getting injured during the feud. Huck is devastated to see Buck dead; so he quickly goes to the swamp where Jim is and the two of them push off downstream. Huck says there is "no home like a raft", because he believes certain places are all cramped up and smothery while a raft isn't. Chapter 19(pg. 157) summary Huck and Jim carry out on their way down the Mississippi. While Huck was out by himself in the canoe he comes across two men on shore in trouble. They beg to be let in the canoe. Both of the men were in trouble from the town folk for conning them out of their money so they flee together. While they were waiting on the bank they found out each other's story so they think up a con to tell the person on a raft so they can tag along. So when they see Huck they tell him that they were an English Duke and the lost son of French king Louis XVI. Huck knew that they were not because they had fake accents and "the son of the french king" refused to say anything in french, but Huck did not say anything to prevent a quarrel. Chapter 20(pg. 169) Summary: Huck tells the king and the duke that he is the son of a farmer and that his father and brother died when a steamboat hit their raft. Huck knows that the two are frauds, but goes along with them to stay safe and unharmed by them. Also, Huck is trying to help them out at the same time. Later, the duke and king come up with ways to make money along the river and come up with the idea of creating a play of short scenes from Shakespeare. While the duke goes to an unlocked printer shop to print a fake pamphlet offering a reward for Jim's capture, the king goes to the revival meeting and scams the crowd. The king tells the crowd that he is a reformed pirate on a mission to convert his "pirate friends". Chapter 21 Summary: Chapter 22 The lynch mob proceeds through the streets to Sherburn's house. The mob is frightened by the sight of Sherburn on his front porch aiming a rifle at everyone. Twain calls it a lynching bee because everyone was swarming colonel Sherburn's house. Sherburn then gives a speech about human nature and the mob backs down. Then Huck goes to the circus. he sees a clown pretending to be drunk forces himself into danger where everyone roars at the sight except for Huck who is scared for the man. The duke and dauphin create a new show and in the flyer say that woman and children are not allowed. The king and duke practice their Shakespeare scenes over and over again for a few days. Then one morning, they canoe with Huck to a town in Arkansas where the duke rents the courthouse for an evening performance. In the meantime, a harmless drunk named Boggs arrives in town and accuses a stubborn shopkeeper named Colonel Sherburn of swindling him. Boggs then starts to insult the colonel who tells him he will tolerate the instults until one o'clock. Boggs still continues and at exactly one o'clock, Sherburn shoots him in the street in broad daylight. A crowd gathers around Broggs as he is dying and then soon set off to lynch Sherburn. Lies and Cons:
"there warn't nobody but just me and pap left...when he died I took what there was left... and started up the river... fell overboard; and that was how I come to be here. So they said I could have a home there as long as I wanted it" (pg.133)
"I am the rightful Duke of Bridgewater. (pg.164)
"... your eyes is lookin' at this very moment on the pore disappeared Dauphin, Looy the Seventeen, son of Looy the Sixteen and Marry Antonette... the wanderin', exiled, trampled-on, and sufferin' rightful King of France." (pg.166)
"...been a pirate for thirty years out in the Indian Ocean... he was a changed man now... put in the rest of his life trying to turn the pirates into the true path" (pg.177)

Superstitions and Folk Beliefs:
"Once there was a thick fog, and the rafts and things that went by was beating tin pans so the steamboats wouldn't run over them. A scow or a raft went by so close we could hear them talking and cussing and laughing -- heard them plain; but we couldn't see no sign of them; it made you feel crawly; it was like spirits carrying on that way in the air. Jim said he believed it was spirits"
"... speckled with stars, and we used to... discuss about whether they was made or only just happened. Jim he allowed they was made, but I allowed they happened. I judged it would have took too long to make so many. Jim said the moon could a laid them... I've seen a frog lay most as many, so of course it could be done. We used to watch the stars that fell, too, and see them streak down. Jim allowed they'd got spoiled and was hove out of the nest.

Parodies of Popular Romance Novels:
"the duke he told him all about who Romeo was and who Juliet was" (pg.173) Racism and Slavery-
"Each person had their own nigger to wait on them -- Buck too. My nigger had a monstrous easy time, because I warn't used to having anybody do anything for me." (pg.143) The Mississippi river is one example of a symbol in this book. The Mississippi river represents freedom for Huck and Jim. The river was provided to carry them to safety so they could become free men.

There were many examples of onomatopoeias in these chapters. For example when twain describes objects as "squeaking"(Pg 91)

When Twain says "The young woman in the picture had a kind of sweet face but there was so many arms it made her look to spidery, seemed to me." He uses a metaphor to compare the woman's picture with the arms, and the looks of long spider arms. (Pg. 95) Hypocrisy of "Civilized" Society-
"We said there warn't no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft. " (pg.156)
"Your newspapers call you a brave people so much that you think you are braver than any other people -- whereas you're just as brave, and no braver. Why don't your juries hang murderers? Because they're afraid the man's friends will shoot them in the back, in the dark -- and it's just what they would do." (pg.195)
"... took their guns along... and kept them between their knees or stood them handy against the wall... It was pretty ornery preaching -- all about brotherly love, and such-like tiresomeness; but everybody said it was a good sermon, and they all talked it over going home, and had such a powerful lot to say about faith and good works and free grace and preforeordestination." Intellectual and Moral Education-
"If I never learnt nothing else out of pap, I learnt that the best way to get along with his kind of people is to let them have their own way." (pg.168)
"Every time a man died, or a woman died, or a child died, she would be on hand with her "tribute" before he was cold... The neighbors said it was the doctor first, then Emmeline, then the undertaker. (pg. 139) Chapter 17:Themes, Motifs and satire "there warn't nobody but just me and pap left...when he died I took what there was left... and started up the river... fell overboard; and that was how I come to be here." (pg.133) This lie convinces the Grangerford's to let Huck stay with them. Twain shows the gullibility of the Grangerford's when Huck tells them about his story and his name. which then they let him stay. This shows how people are easily convinced to believe a lie. Chapter 18: Themes,motifs, and satire Huck sees the first of feuding when Buck tries to shoot one of the Sheperdson's
When he reads all of the poems that the dead girl used to write about dead people.

Twain shows how pointless fighting is.
Also he shows that people can make in impact on others even if they aren't there. Chapter 19 Themes, Motifs,and Satire Themes: "Each person had their own nigger to wait on them -- Buck too. My nigger had a monstrous easy time, because I warn't used to having anybody do anything for me." (pg.143)

Effect: Shows how people valued slaves as property, not people.

Motifs: Lies and cons: "I am the rightful Duke of Bridgewater. (pg.164)
"... your eyes is lookin' at this very moment on the pore disappeared Dauphin, Looy the Seventeen, son of Looy the Sixteen and Marry Antonette... the wanderin', exiled, trampled-on, and sufferin' rightful King of France." (pg.166)

Effect: This shows the trickery of the two con-artists, which does not stop there. Chapter 20: Themes, Motifs, and Satire Themes: Hypocrisy of "civilized society":"We said there warn't no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft. " (pg.156) Effect: Shows how Huck doesn't think that living in a house and being civilized is better than living on a raft in the middle of the river.

Motifs: Lies and Cons: The Dauphin trick the town's people that he is an ex-pirate and that he needs money to go to the indian ocean for a missionary trip.
Effect: Shows how people lie in order to get things that they don't deserve.

Satire: Gullibility: Huck convinces the con-artists that Jim is not a run away slave but an orphan.

Effect: Shows how some people believe in stories that seem oddly peculiar. Chapter 22 Themes, Motifs, and Satire Themes: Hypocrisy of "Civilized" Society- "Your newspapers call you a brave people so much that you think you are braver than any other people -- whereas you're just as brave, and no braver. Why don't your juries hang murderers? Because they're afraid the man's friends will shoot them in the back, in the dark -- and it's just what they would do." (pg.195) Effect: The town is lynching trying to capture Colonel Sherburn and this part helps show how furious a town can get over things like Sherburn did. ALso we understand that Sherburn felt he could do this due to the fact that he knew he wouldn't get in trouble. Motifs: "Why don't your juries hang murderers? Because they're afraid the man's friends will shoot them in the back, in the dark--and it's just what they would do" (pg 195) Effect: This helps to show how the society has changed and is afraid to do something due to the thought of others trying to rebel. This holds the juries back from doing things they feel are necessary. Satire: The handbill at the end of the chapter to the last word helps satire uncultured tastes. This is uncultured tastes due to the fact that the handbill was against ladies and children. Chapter 21 Themes, Motifs, and Satire Themes: Intellectual Education: "The duke had to learn him over and over again, how to say every speech; and he made him sigh, and put his hand on his heat, and after a while he said he done it pretty well;" (pg 137) Effect: The duke had to review the lines for the Shakespeare play over and over again with the king until he got them right. Practicing and learning their lines properly actually got them somewhere. Motifs: "the duke he told him all about who Romeo was and who Juliet was" (pg.173) Effect: Thank you for listening and watching! In this part of the story, the duke is trying to help the king learn about the play a little better. So although they want to do the play for a bad purpose, they are still putting the time and effort into the whole play. Motif: Satire: Lies and cons: Gullibility: Effect: Effect: Themes: Motifs: Effect: Satire: Feuding: Sentimentality
and
literary triteness: Effect: "Each person had their own nigger to wait on them -- Buck too. My nigger had a monstrous easy time, because I warn't used to having anybody do anything for me." (pg.143) Racism and Slavery: "Every time a man died, or a woman died, or a child died, she would be on hand with her "tribute" before he was cold... The neighbors said it was the doctor first, then Emmeline, then the undertaker. (pg. 139)
Huck realizes that the fighting between the Grangerfords and the Sheperdsons is stupid but still they go on killing each other.
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