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Unit Plan - A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

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Emily Marie

on 28 November 2012

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Transcript of Unit Plan - A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

A Tree Grows In Brooklyn
by Betty Smith 1943 BETTY SMITH (Elisabeth Wehner)
December 15, 1896 - January 17, 1972

Grew up poor in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NYC
Daughter of German immigrants
Her upbringing served as a basis for ATGIB, but she has said the novel is not autobiographical
Had two daughters with first husband
Received her college degree at University of Michigan
Studied literature, journalism, and drama
Divorced in 1938, remarried and relocated to North Carolina
Won awards and fellowships for her work as a writer and dramatist A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
(Film, 1945)
Directed by Elia Kazan Historical Context for ATGIB story (Year 1912):
April 1912, the Titanic sinks
Women still have 8 years until the 19th Ammendment passes and they are given the right to vote
WW1 will officially begin in 2 years (1914-1918)
Woodrow Wilson elected president in 1912
The Republic of China is established
Shopping bag invented by grocery store owner Walter Deubner from St. Paul Minnesota General Assessment:
Given copies of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, discussion on symbols, and a MEAEAL expository writing handout, SWBAT complete the planning worksheet and write a one page expository paper.

Essay Prompt: We have discussed in class how many of the characters and objects in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn are symbolic. Select one of these symbols and create a concise argument on why you think that it is the most important symbol in expressing Francie’s journey in the novel using proper MEAL format. (Examples: the tree of life, Katie, etc.) Bodily/Kinesthetic Assessment:
Given the text and an assigned “Book” from the novel, SWBAT in groups of 4 to 5, write and perform a brief 2-3 minutes summarizing skit (with script) about their assigned portion of ATGIB. Visual/Spacial Assessment:
Given the text, drawing paper, and art supplies, and any of their notes, SWBAT illustrate 10 important scenes/moments from ATGIB in a small, hand-made scrapbook, and write an accompanying paragraph for each illustration explaining the scene's importance as a part of the whole novel. Student must identify and exhibit understanding of important themes, literary elements, and characters from the novel and convey this through their illustrations and paragraphs. Symbolism discovering hidden truths A symbol is an object that represents itself AND a greater idea Universal Symbols Some symbols are UNIVERSAL. They represent emotions or ideas that the reader and the writer have in common. Symbolism in Literature Symbolism creates a LINK between:

Objects, characters, scenes, or actions
AND
Abstract concepts, values, or ways of life Symbolism in literature
gives insight
into the
characters Emphasizes key ideas or themes Symbolism stresses the plot Can you think of any characters or objects in
"A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" that might be symbolic? UNIT Standards:
Reading for Literature 7 - Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).

Reading for Literature 8A - Interpret a literary work by analyzing how the author uses literary elements (e.g., mood, tone, point of view, personification, symbolism).

Reading for Literature 1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Reading for Literature 6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.

Writing 3A - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

Reading for Literature 3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events). UNIT Objectives:

1) Given a copy of ATGIB, lessons on historical context, literary devices, themes, and symbols, SWBAT demonstrate understanding of the concepts and themes of the novels through successful completion of discussions, worksheets, venn diagrams, writing, performance, and visual art.

2) Given the students have read the text and participated in class activities, SWBAT draw their own final conclusions about the novel through expository writing, performance, or visual artwork at 90% accuracy.



Essential Questions:
- Are struggle and hardship essential to a good story?
- What is a family?
- Is family important?
- Are friends and family different?
- What is the hardest part about growing up?
- Do you think growing up in the early 20th century was different or similar to growing up in our time? GRADE 7 UNIT:
A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN Lesson #3 - Symbolism

Reading:

1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

8. A. Interpret a literary work by analyzing how the author uses literary elements (e.g., mood, tone, point of view, personification, symbolism).



Given class discussion on symbols in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, symbols worksheet, and markers SWBAT in small groups identify in writing 5-7 characters or objects in ATGIB that have symbolic significance. Citing evidence from the text they must list out the character or object they find symbolic, what the character/object symbolizes, and they must complete a rudimentary sketch of a universal symbol for that character/object at 95% accuracy. Standards Objectives Lesson #4 - Point of View

Reading:
6. Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.

Writing:
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.



Given the assigned reading on point of view and narration, and provided that the students have done the reading SWBAT creatively re-write a scene from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn from the point of view of another character in the novel using grammar and dialogue appropriate to the character whose perspective they are representing at 90% accuracy. Objectives Standards Lesson #1 - Comparing Films and Text

Reading for Literature #7

Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film)




Given a large sheet of paper, colorful markers, and provided the students have watched the film clip and read the first chapter, SWBAT in small groups, compare and contrast (using a venn diagram) the similarities and differences between chapter one of ATGIB and the corresponding scene from the film, and discuss their findings in a class discussion at 95% accuracy. Standards Objectives Lesson #2 - Close Reading

Reading:

3. Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

8. A. Interpret a literary work by analyzing how the author uses literary elements (e.g., mood, tone, point of view, personification, symbolism).



Given a copy of chapter 10 of ATGIB and the worksheet, and provided the students know about literary devices and close readings, SWBAT, in small groups, complete the close reading worksheet, and be able to discuss their answers and personal responses to the chapter in a class discussion at 90% accuracy. Standards Objectives ASSESSMENTS
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