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Generative King Archetype

A Model for Generative Leadership

Mitch Cowart

on 30 January 2014

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Transcript of Generative King Archetype

c.1500, "to beget" (offspring), a back formation from generation or else from L. generatus, pp. of generare "to beget, produce" (see generation); originally "to beget;" in reference to natural forces, conditions, substances, etc., attested from 1560s. Related: Generated; generating.
1580s, "of noble birth," from M.Fr. généreux, from L. generosus "of noble birth," figuratively "magnanimous, generous," from genus (gen. generis) "race, stock" (see genus). Secondary senses of "unselfish" (1690s) and "plentiful" (1610s) were present in French and in Latin. Related: Generously; generousness.
1640s, "person or thing that generates," from L. generator "a begetter, producer," agent noun from pp. stem of generare (see generation). Meaning "machine that generates power" first recorded 1794; in sense of "machine that generates electric energy," 1879. Fem. generatrix attested from 1650s.
"to beget, produce"
"a person that generates"
"of nobel birth"
"origin, creation, generation"
late 14c., "tutelary god (classical or pagan)," from L. genius "guardian deity or spirit which watches over each person from birth; spirit, incarnation, wit, talent;" also "prophetic skill," originally "generative power," from root of gignere "beget, produce" (see kin), from PIE base *gen- "produce." Sense of "characteristic disposition" is from 1580s. Meaning "person of natural intelligence or talent" and that of "natural ability" are first recorded 1640s.
"incarnation of generative power"
1770, as a French word in English (nativized from c.1840), from Fr. genre "kind, sort, style" (see gender). Used especially in French for "independent style." Of painting, "depicting scenes of ordinary life" (as compared to "landscape," "historical," etc.) from 1849.
"independent style"
1560s, "pertaining to marriage," from L. genialis "pleasant, festive," lit. "pertaining to marriage rites," from genius "guardian spirit" (see genius). Originally used in the Latin literal sense; meaning "cheerful, friendly" first recorded 1746. Related: Genially.
"pertaining to marriage"
early 14c., "body of individuals born about the same period" (usually 30 years), from O.Fr. generacion (12c.) and directly from L. generationem (nom. generatio) "generating, generation," noun of action from pp. stem of generare "bring forth" (see genus). Meanings "act or process of procreation," "process of being formed," "offspring of the same parent" are late 14c.
"to bring forth"
late 14c., "whole class of things or persons," from general (adj.). Meaning "commander of an army" is 1570s, shortening of captain general, from M.Fr. capitaine général. The English adjective was affixed to civic officer designations by late 14c. to indicate superior rank and extended jurisdiction.
"commander of an army"
O.E. Genesis, first book of the Pentateuch, from L. genesis, adopted as title of first book of Old Testament in Vulgate, from Gk. genesis "origin, creation, generation," from gignesthai "to be born," related to genos "race, birth, descent" (see genus). As such, it translated Heb. bereshith, lit. "in the beginning," which was the first word of the text, taken as its title. Extended sense of "origin, creation" first recorded in English c.1600.
1540s, "mounted trooper," from French contraction (14c.) of gens d'armes "men at arms," later applied to military police (1796 in English). Gens is plural of gent "nation, people," from L. gentem (nom. gens) "race, nation, people" (see genus). Related: Gendarmerie. French also had gens de (la) robe "lawyers," sometimes borrowed in English.
"men at arms"
"elder statesman of Japan," 1876, from Japanese, lit. "first elders."
"elder statesman"
generative KING

1847, in reference to ancient Rome, "tribe, clan, house (of families having a name and certain religious rites in common and a presumed common origin)," from L. gens (gen. gentis) "race, clan, nation" (see genus).
"tribe, clan, house"
(pl. genera), 1550s as a term of logic, "kind or class of things" (biological sense dates from c.1600), from L. genus (gen. generis) "race, stock, kind; family, birth, descent, origin," cognate with Gk. genos "race, kind," and gonos "birth, offspring, stock," from PIE base *gen-/*gon-/*gn- "produce, beget, be born" (cf. Skt. janati "begets, bears," janah "race," janman- "birth, origin," jatah "born;" Avestan zizanenti "they bear;" Gk. gignesthai "to become, happen;" L. gignere "to beget," gnasci "to be born," genius "procreative divinity, inborn tutelary spirit, innate quality," ingenium "inborn character," germen "shoot, bud, embryo, germ;" Lith. gentis "kinsmen;" Goth. kuni "race;" O.E. cennan "beget, create;" O.H.G. kind "child;" O.Ir. ro-genar "I was born;" Welsh geni "to be born;" Armenian chanim "I bear, I am born").
"race, family, descent, origin"
late 15c., "one who acts," from L. agentem (nom. agens) "effective, powerful," prp. of agere "to set in motion, drive, lead, conduct" (see act). Meaning "any natural force or substance which produces a phenomenon" is first recorded 1570s. Meaning "deputy, representative" is from 1590s. Sense of "spy, secret agent" is attested by 1916. As an adjective, from 1610s.
"deputy, representative, one who acts"
"well-born man," early 13c., from gentle + man. Related: Gentlemen. Gentleman's agreement is first attested 1929. Gentleman farmer recorded from 1749.
"well born man"
c.1300, "nobility of rank or birth," from O.Fr. genterise, variant of gentilise "noble birth, gentleness," from gentil (see gentle). Meaning "noble persons" is from 1520s. Earlier in both senses was gentrice (c.1200 as "nobility of character," late 14c. as "noble persons"). In Anglo-Irish, gentry was a name for "the fairies" (1880), and gentle could mean "enchanted" (1823).
"nobility of rank or birth, nobility of character"
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