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THE HISTORY OF ITALIAN FEUDS AND VENDETTAS/GANGS

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Emma Tabb

on 16 May 2016

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Transcript of THE HISTORY OF ITALIAN FEUDS AND VENDETTAS/GANGS

Vendetta
Buondelmonte Family
The Guelphs and Ghibelllines
The Guelphs and Ghibellines were two political parties that supported the Pope or the Holy Roman Emperors. Guelphs were usually commercially wealthy. The Ghibellines' wealth came from landed estates.
How does Shakespeare relate?
The History of Italian Feuds and Vendettas/Gangs
By: Gracie Nichols and emma Tabb



The 13th century is known as the most violent era in history. Arguments took place between political parties/two families. Shakespeare wrote about an argument between two families.
Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet
A vendetta (feud), is an extended argument between two groups of people. The word Vendetta is Italian word meaning vengeance. Someone would get revenge on a family member’s death by killing the one responsible or their relatives. The responsibility mainly falls on the closest male relative.
Sources
http://www.ultimatehistoryproject.com/guelfs-and-ghibellines.html

http://www.florenceinferno.com/florence-bloodiest-murder/

http://www.brighton73.freeserve.co.uk/tomsplace/interests/medieval/montaperti.htm

http://www.toptenz.net/top-ten-famous-feuds-and-vendettas.php

http://www.historynet.com/battle-of-montaperti-13th-century-violence-on-the-italian-hill-of-death.htm
Full transcript