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Cortes by Pablo Neruda

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by

austin bennett

on 26 May 2015

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Transcript of Cortes by Pablo Neruda

Hernan Cortes (1485-1547) wash conquistador who overthrew the Aztec empire. Born in Medillin, Spain, to a lesser noble family, Cortes began advancing Spain's position in the 1500s.
Who is Cortes?
Cortés has no people, is a
cold
beam,
heart
dead
in the
armor
.

And advances
burying
daggers,
beating
the lowlands, the pawed-up
fragrant cordilleras
,
camping his troop among
orchids
and
crowning pines
,

trampling
jasmine
,
up to the gates of Tlaxcala.

Austin Bennett and Amber LeBlanc
Cortes by Pablo Neruda
The Story
The poem is a story of the conquistador, Hernan Cortés.

Depicts him as being cruel and greedy, tells of his betrayal and power (This being Neruda’s opinion)

The destruction of the country, Tlaxcala, Mexico

Narration
Cortes is a narrative poem

Who the narrator is, is questionable, it could be the country, Neruda himself, or another random person speaking.

The majority is told in third person omniscient, and briefly told in second person.


Punctuation

Word Choice


Fruitful lands
, my Lord and King, mosques that have
gold
encrusted thick by the Indian’s hand.

Flashback

Italicized

Word Choice


Punctuation

Word choice

Word choice

(
My downcast brother, make no friend of the
red-flushed vulture
: I speak from the
mossy earth
to
you
, from the
roots of

our

realm
.
Tomorrow
will rain
blood
, will raise
tears
enough for mist and fumes and rivers until
your
own eyes
dissolve
.
)

Punctuation

Word Choice

Word Choice

Metaphor

Second Person and the future

Cortés receives a
dove
,
receives a
pheasant
,
a
zither
from the king’s musicians
,

but
he wants the roomful of
gold
,
wants
one thing more
,
and everything
falls
in the
plunderers
’ chests.

Punctuation

Word Choice

Word Choice

Climax

The king leans out from a balcony:

This is my brother
,

he says. The stones of the people fly up in answer, and Cortés
whets
his
daggers
on
quisling
kisses.

Punctuation

Word Choice

Dialogue

He returns to Tlaxcala, the
wind
bears a
muted rumor of lament
.

Word Choice

Word Choice
Full transcript