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Untitled Prezi

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by

Arthur Alger

on 20 October 2014

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F . I . D . A
CRIMES ACT 1900 - S192E
Personal
fraud

Online
fraud

Points of proof of fraud:
The dishonest appropriation
Of property that belongs to another
For one's financial advantage
References
ABS (2012) Personal fraud 2010 – 2011. Canberra: Australian Bureau of
Statistics

AIC (2010), Fraud and Deception related crimes. Canberra: Australian Institute
of Criminology

Anderson, J. &Budd, C.(2011). Consumer fraud in Australasia: Results of the
Australasian Consumer Fraud Taskforce online Australia surveys 2008 and 2009. Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology.

AUSTRAC. (2013). AUSTRAC: typologies and case studies report 2013.
Retrieved from www.austrac.gov.au

Australian Institute of Criminology. (2007). Australian crime: facts and figures
2006. Canberra: Australia.

Brown, S. Esbensen, F. & Geis G. (2010). Criminology examining crime and its
context: 7th edition. New Jersey: Lexis Nexis Group

Lewis, D. (2014). Australians losing $7 million a month in internet fraud.
Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved from http://www.abc.net.au/

Smith, R (2003). Serious Fraud in Australia and New Zealand. Canberra:
Australian institute of Criminology

Smith R (2007). Consumer scams in Australia: an overview. Trends & issues in
crime and criminal issues


66.7%
Individuals that work for a
6 different departments that committed more
than
80%

of fraud cases
- male perpetrators of fraud
33.3%
- female perpetrators of fraud
Middle-aged males and females
MORE
likely to commit fraud than a person
under 26
or
over 50
longer period of time
generate more trust.
From this, they can acquire
HIGHER LEVEL jobs
and...
...a
BETTER UNDERSTANDING
of the internal processes of the business
= LEADS TO MORE FRAUD
university or college degree
36.9%
of all frauds
graduated from high school
25.3%
postgraduate degree
16.9%
more likely to commit fraud
(42.1%)
(16.9%)
commit less cases of fraud
EMPLOYEES
OWNERS
only
7%
of fraud perpetrators had previously been convicted of a fraud-related offence
86%
had NEVER been convicted of any prior offence
Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, (2010), Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse, 2010 Global Fraud Study
Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, (2010), Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse, 2010 Global Fraud Study
Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, (2010), Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse, 2010 Global Fraud Study
Association of Certifies Fraud Examiner, (2010), Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse, 2010 Global Fraud Study
Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, (2010), Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse, 2010 Global Fraud Study
Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, (2010), Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse, 2010 Global Fraud Study
Crime Rates and Statistics
Three types of personal fraud: identity theft/fraud, credit card fraud and scams.

Victims of personal fraud by fraud type (2007; 2010-2011)

Rational Action Theory
Potential
victim
Motivated
offender
Lack of a capable
guardian or an
Authority figure
Smith, R (2003)
Credit card fraud: (2007) - 375,000
(2010-2011) - 650,000

Identity theft: (2007) - 125,000
(2010-2011) - 50,000

Scams: (2007) - 325,000
(2010-2011) - 525,000

Total: (2007) - 775,000;
(2010-2011) - 1,225,000
Smith R (2007)
1.2
The Internet
has connected
the world, and
connected offenders
with Potential victims
million Australians aged 15 years and over we victims to at least one count of personal fraud
which equates to
of the population
(over 15 years)
Corporate
Fraud

The Internet allows individuals
to be targeted easily
2010-2011 victimization rates by personal fraud type: (3.7%; 0.3% and 2.9% respectively)

Making it easier for
offenders to
target victims
6.7%
From greater distances apart
Through
multiple
servers
Through multiple countries
Making them
harder to trace
Making it far less
likely that they will
get caught
Every year over 1.2 million Australians are victims of Fraud
But only 100,000 offences are reported to police
ABS (2012) Personal fraud 2010 – 201
AIC (2010), Fraud and Deception related crimes
Law enforcement agencies do not have the capability or the expertise to trace fraud.

This is where FIDA comes in. Unlike conventional law enforcement, we are highly trained, and are invested in preventing fraud before it happens.
Protective and
preventative measures

FIDA is an expert in all forms of fraud.
We not only investigate fraud, but we
also specialise in preventative measures

Knowledge about a particular scam is the highest protective factor
Anderson, J. &Budd, C.(2011)
target hardening
FIDA provides a number of services through its web page aimed at
A private investigation service aimed at detecting the risk of fraud before it occurs
Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2011). Personal
fraud 2010-2011. Canberra: Australia.
Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2011). Personal fraud
2010-2011. Canberra: Australia.
During 2010 and 2011,
Australians lost a total of
$1.4 billion
as a result of personal fraud
60%
of victims lost money, with an average
of $2000 each
Online fraud
is becoming increasingly well known, as
Australians transfer at least
$7 million
into fraudulent accounts via the internet
every month
Case Studies of Serious Fraud
- $30 million university scam in conjunction with maintenance companies
- $82 million Ponzi investment scheme
via foreign exchange
- Fraudster 'high roller' stole $78 million from Asian banks in order to gamble at casinos
AUSTRAC. (2013). AUSTRAC: typologies and case
studies report 2013. Retrieved from www.austrac.gov.au

Lewis, D. (2014). Australians losing $7 million a month in internet fraud.
Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved from http://www.abc.net.au/

Australian Institute of Criminology. (2007). Australian
crime: facts and figures 2006. Canberra: Australia.
Full transcript