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Growth Mindset

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Erin Bouda

on 16 November 2016

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Transcript of Growth Mindset

Malleable Intelligence
Much like lifting weights, the more you learn and practice new things, the more your brain will grow!
Growth Mindset
Growth
vs.
Fixed
Mindset
According to Carol Dweck, a psychologist from Standford University, if someone has a
fixed mindset
they believe their intelligence is based on fixed traits. On the other hand, someone who has a
growth mindset
believes they can develop basic abilities through dedication and hard work (2010).
Ted Talk - The Power of Belief
Research to support Growth Mindset and Praise
Carol Dweck has conducted many experiments on growth mindset to prove her theory is true. The following is just one example that demonstrates the power of praise and it's relationship to growth mindset.
What do you think?
* Are people born smart, average or dumb?
* Do the parts of the brain change in size?
* Is the brain made up of billions of nerve cells?
* If you use your brain a lot will it become stronger?
* Can you train your brain to become a better reader or better at math?
* Are people born being bad at math or reading?
* Do your brain cells multiply when you challenge them?
* Is the brain a muscle?
* If you have to work hard at something, does it mean you aren't smart?
What do you believe?
By: Eduardo Briceno

(Time 10:51 - worth every second!)
In this experiment children were pulled out of class individually to solve a puzzle. Half of the students were told how smart they were as they solved the puzzle. The others were praised on how hard they had worked to solve the puzzle. The students were then presented with an option for their second puzzle. They were able to choose one just like the first or choose a different one that would be more difficult but they would learn from doing it. The study showed that the students who were praised for their intelligence chose to do the easy puzzle for fear of them “not being smart” and failing at the second. The students who were praised for their effort opted for the more challenging puzzle (Bronson, 2014).
Inside the cortex of the brain are billions of tiny nerve cells called neurons that have branches that connect them to other cells. Communication between these brain cells is what allows us to think and solve problems.
The more you learn new things, these tiny connections in the brain actually multiply and get stronger!
The more you challenge your mind to learn, the more brain cells you grow!
* Design challenging, meaningful tasks
* Praise for EFFORT not intelligence!
* Emphasize fast learning is not always the deepest and best learning
* Teach students about the different mindsets
* Create a culture of risk-taking!
* Emphasize CHALLENGE, not success!
* Present challenges as fun and exciting while portraying easy tasks as boring and useless for the brain.

How to Encourage a Growth Mindset
Real-life Scenarios
Was Michael Jordan born to dunk?
Was Taylor Swift born a pop-star?
Was George Washington born to be the 1st president?
Were you born walking and talking?
So....what do you think now?
* Are people born smart, average or dumb?
* Do the parts of the brain change in size?
* Is the brain made up of billions of nerve cells?
* If you use your brain a lot will it become stronger?
* Can you train your brain to become a better reader or better at math?
* Are people born being bad at math or reading?
* Do your brain cells multiply when you challenge them?
* Is the brain a muscle?
* If you have to work hard at something, does it mean you aren't smart?

Did any of your answers, change? If so, why? Was it because you CHALLENGED your thoughts and you learned something new?
Resources
Slide 2
Dweck, C. (2010). MINDSET. Retrieved on April 12, 2014 from http://mindsetonline.com/whatisit/about/.

Your brain is a muscle, the more exercise it gets, the more it will grow!
Intelligence is CHANGEABLE! No one is born smart. You have to exercise your brain to become smart!
Slide 3
Briceno, E. (2012). The Power of Belief - Mindset and Success. Retrieved on April 12, 2014 from youtube.com.
Slide 4
Dweck, C. (nd). Two Mindsets Graphic. Retrieved on April 12, 2014 from http://nigelholmes.com/graphic/two-mindsets-stanford-magazine/.
Slide 5
Bronson, P. (2014). How Not to Talk to Your Kids. Retrieved on April 12, 2014 from http://nymag.com/news/features/27840/index4.html.
Slide 6
You Can Grow Your Intelligence. (2014). Malleable Intelligence Student Handouts. Retrieved on April 12, 2014 from http://mcpmathconcepts.wikispaces.com/file/view/Malleable+Intelligence+Article.pdf.
Slide 7
Dweck, C. (2010). Even Geniuses Work Hard. Retrieved on April 12, 2014 from http://www.educationalleadership-digital.com/educationalleadership/201009?pg=18#pg18.
Slide 1 and Slides 6 -11
Google Images. (2014). Retrieved on April 12, 2014 from http://www.google.com/imghp.


One group was put into cages with nothing to do but eat and sleep. They had no stimulation.


Growth Mindset
Research Continued....
The second group of rats were put into cages where they had opportunities to play and interact. They had a lot of stimulation.
Another experiment was conducted by Carol Dweck with lab rats. There were two groups of rats.

Results: The rats that were more stimulated were found to be smarter than the others and they also had heavier brains.
“Don’t tell children they are
smart. More than three decades of
research shows that a focus on
effort – not on intelligence or
ability – is the key to success
in school and in life.”

Carol Dweck, PhD.
Slide 11
Dweck, C. (2006). Mindset: the new psychology of success. New York: Random House.
Full transcript