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Sonnet 79, Edmund Spenser

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Gurjiv Kaur

on 22 April 2017

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Transcript of Sonnet 79, Edmund Spenser

Sonnet 79, Edmund Spenser
Sonnet 79
Men call you fair, and you do credit it,
For that your self ye daily such do see:
But the true fair, that is the gentle wit,
And virtuous mind, is much more prais'd of me.
For all the rest, how ever fair it be,
Shall turn to naught and lose that glorious hue:
But only that is permanent and free
From frail corruption, that doth flesh ensue.
That is true beauty: that doth argue you
To be divine, and born of heavenly seed:
Deriv'd from that fair Spirit, from whom all true
And perfect beauty did at first proceed.
He only fair, and what he fair hath made,
All other fair, like flowers untimely fade.
About the Sonnet
Sequence of sonnets called Amoretti , (“little love poems” or “little Cupids”) , published in 1595.

Letters written to Elizabeth Boyle who became his second wife in 1594

Representation of the development of his love for his wife

Progression
of Ideas
Theme Statement
Image by goodtextures: http://fav.me/d2he3r8
Work Cited
A person's inner characteristics are more important than outwards appearances
"Amoretti." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 10 Oct.
2014. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.

"Edmund Spenser." - Simple English Wikipedia, the Free
Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2014.

Graham, Ruth. "Amoretti LXXIX: Men Call You Fair." Poetry
Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 10 Oct. 2014.

Keach, William. "Edmund Spenser." Adventures in English
Literature. Athena ed. Austin, TX: Holt Rinehart and
Winston, 1996. 154-57. Print. 10 0ct. 2014.

Shostak, Elizabeth, and Sonia Benson. "Edmund Spenser."
Elizabethan World--biographies. Detroit: Thomson
Gale, 2007. 217-23. Print. 10 Oct. 2014.
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http://www.academia.edu/889800/Spensers_Amoretti_and_Elizabeth_Boyle_Her_Names_Immortalized_full_unedited_version_
Quatrain 1
quatrain 2
QUATRAIN 3
COUPLET
qUATRAIN 1
Men call you fair, and you do credit it,
For that your self ye daily such do see:
But the true fair, that is the gentle wit,
And virtuous mind, is much more prais'd of me.
men call you beautiful ( physical beauty ), and you do ( credit )believe it
because you see yourself daily ( not mocking - acknowledging that she is physically attractive )
but in my opinion, your wit
and charm is more beautiful to me
qUATRAIN 2
For all the rest, how ever fair it be,
Shall turn to naught and lose that glorious hue:
But only that is permanent and free
From frail corruption, that doth flesh ensue.
Everything else , no matter how beautiful
will turn to nothing, and lose its former beauty/ fade away
but only (your personality ) is free
from being corrupted by the effects of aging on her skin (physical change)
qUATRAIN 3
That is true beauty: that doth argue you
To be divine, and born of heavenly seed:
Deriv'd from that fair Spirit, from whom all true
And perfect beauty did at first proceed.
Your inner /natural beauty is much more wonderful
in fact it almost makes you seem god-like/ of belonging to God,like an angel
Perfect beauty is created by God, and no amount of make up will be able to match that perfection
qUATRAIN 4
He only fair, and what He fair hath made,
All other fair, like flowers untimely fade.
Since God is fair ( just ), everything he makes is correct/just/right
Every other types of fair (beauty), not made by God, like a flower, dies/ fades away
What does it all mean?
Poetic Devices
Allusion: "Shall turn to naught and lose that
glorious
hue" (line 6) = The Fairy Queen

"Deriv'd from that fair
Spirit
, from whom all true," (line 11) = reference to God

Simile: "All other fair,
like flowers
, untimely fade." (line 14) = compares beauty to flowers, both fade

Repetition: "
fair
" repeated five times

Full transcript