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Figurative Language in the Lion King

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by

Haley Smith

on 6 February 2014

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Transcript of Figurative Language in the Lion King

Figurative Language in the Lion King
Personification
In this clip Simba says that
“I laugh at the face of danger.”
implying that danger has a
face.

Another example of
personification is that animals
are talking and have human
qualities.
Hyperbole
Timon jokes with Simba exaggerating about dressing in women's clothes and doing the
hula.
Allusion
In the movie there is a
scene were Scar is holding
a lion skull, its a reference
to Hamlet, which the
movie is loosely based
upon.
Similes
Mufasa is comparing a
king's time as a ruler to the
sun. He says that it rises
and falls just like the sun.
Since he uses 'like' to
compare a king and the
sun it would be a simile.
Puns
There are many hidden
puns in movies such as
this one:
Simba “What’s a motto?"
Timon “Nothing, what’s
a motto with you?”
Hyperbole: An
exaggeration or claim
that is not meant to
be taken literally
Puns: Making a joke
exploiting the different possible meanings of a word
Simile: Comparing two
things using 'like' or as.
Personification: Giving
human like qualities animals,
plants, non-living things, etc.
Allusion: an indirect or passing reference.
That's it.
Haley Smith
Full transcript