Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Fluid Power

Day 1 Presentation - Robo Hoops
by

Joe Kahl

on 28 November 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Fluid Power

Today, we will learn about: Pascal's Law
The 2 types of fluid
Hydraulic and Pneumatic
How fluid power works
Laws that define fluid’s behavior Fluid Power Basics What is Force?
the push or pull of one object on another force commonly causes movement
measured in pounds

What is Pressure?
force applied to the surface of an object
measured in psi (pounds per square inch)

Design Engineering
Fluid Power What is Fluid Power?
It is the technology that uses the properties of fluids to generate, control, and transmit power as a result of the pressurization of fluids.
http://science.howstuffworks.com/hydraulic1.htm

2 Types of Fluid Systems
Hydraulic system- uses a liquid, such as oil or water
Pneumatic system- uses air or inert gas
Fluid Power Equipment (examples) Hydraulic Car Lift Pneumatic Wrench Hydraulic Excavator Pneumatic Nail Gun Force and Pressure How Fluid Power Works Convert!
Fluids are pressurized by electric motors or gas engines
Transmit!
Fluid is moved through hoses/pipes
Convert!
The pressurized fluid causes work to occur
Store!
Fluid is returned to and kept in a closed contained under pressure to be used later
How Fluid Power Works Hydraulic Pneumatic Convert Transmit Convert Uses of Fluid Power Use a liquid

Must have a complete circuit with return line and reservoir to hold extra liquid

Liquids are incompressible
Use a gas

Do not need to be a complete circuit because extra can be released back into the atmosphere

Gases can be compressed
Hydraulic VS. Pneumatic Similarities Flow Flow Hydraulics & Pneumatics
How Do We Explain Fluid's Behaviors? Pascal’s Law

Boyle’s Law

Charles’s Law

Bernoulli’s Theorem
When pressure is applied to an enclosed fluid, that pressure is equally put on all parts of the fluid.
Boyle's Law If the pressure of a GAS increases, the volume decreases IF the temperature remains the same
Charles's Law If temperature increases, the volume of a gas increases
If temperature decreases, the volume of a gas decreases
Bernoulli’s Theorem An increase in the speed of a fluid (velocity) will cause the pressure to fall
A slowing in the speed of a fluid will raise the pressure
Fluid Power is Everywhere Everyday Examples Review __________________states that when pressure is applied to an enclosed fluid, that pressure is equally put on all parts of the fluid.
Pascal's Law __________________states that if the pressure of a GAS increases, the volume decreases IF the temperature remains the same
Boyle's Law If temperature increases, the volume of a gas increases
If temperature decreases, the volume of a gas decreases
Charles's Law An increase in the speed of a fluid (velocity) will cause the pressure to fall
A slowing in the speed of a fluid will raise the pressure
Bernoulli’s Theorem
Fluid power is the technology that uses the properties of fluids to generate, control, and transmit power as a result of the _______________ of fluids.
Pressurization 2 Types of Fluid Systems
Uses a liquid, such as oil or water
Uses air or inert gas
Hydraulic Pneumatic Which is incompressible: gas or liquid?
References Brain, M. (1998-2010). How Hydraulic Machines Work. Retrieved 2010, from How Stuff Works: http://science.howstuffworks.com/hydraulic1.htm

Brusic, F. a. (2008). Technology Engineering and Design. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. .

Bush, D., & Kniivila, L. (Unknown). Fluid Power. Retrieved 2010, from Google Docs: http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:oHNR61mdjB8J:litesource.org/Aux_pages/Briefs/Elementary%2520Briefs/(E-2%265)%2520Pneumatic%2520Technology.pdf+fluid+power+systems+
convert+and+transmit&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESiOKA2VCuQ9Z34gcALPA3BIHwfXMaSrX

Garber, T. (N/A). Fluid Power: Powerpoint for Design Engineering. Pennsylvania.

Hutchinson, J., & Karsnitz, J. R. (1994). Design and Problem Solving in Technology. Albany: Delmar Publishers Inc. .

Kohl. (N/A). Fluid Power. Retrieved 2010, from CTEC: http://engineering-foundations.com/2manufacturing/fluid%20power.htm

National Fluid Power Association. (N/A). What is Fluid Power. Retrieved 2010, from NFPA: http://www.nfpa.com/ourindustry/OurInd_AboutFP_WhatIsFluidPower.asp
Full transcript