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HOW TO STRUCTURE A MONOLOGUE

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Tomás Pérez Vellarino

on 16 November 2014

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Transcript of HOW TO STRUCTURE A MONOLOGUE

2) TO GRAB THE ATTENTION OF THE AUDIENCE, YOU MAY EMPLOY.
Rhetorical questions.
Example: Are children and teenagers watching too much TV these days?
Remember that when you ask a rhetorical question you don’t have to answer it. It’s just used to make the audience think and make your topic more interesting.
Interesting facts.
Examples: According to an article I´ve read recently, … / Did you know that…? / I would like to share an amazing fact/figure with you.
Stories.
Examples: Let me tell you what happened to me…/ Suppose…/ Imagine…/ Say… (=imagine)
Problems to think about.
Examples: Suppose you wanted to…/ Imagine you had to… / What would be your first step?
Quotations (Sayings or phrases from an important or famous person).
Examples: as … once said, …/ To quote a well-known writer, … / To put it in the words of…
MONOLOGUES
This leads directly to my  next point.
This brings us to the next question.
Let’s now move on to…
After examining this point, let’s turn to…
Let’s now take a look at…
I think… I consider... I reckon... I believe... I estimate...
I feel that…
In my opinion, … From my mind,... To my mind, ...
As far as I’m concerned…
As I see it…
In my view…
I tend to think that…
From my point of view…
I’m absolutely convinced that…
I’m sure that…
I strongly believe that…
I have no doubt that…
The truth of the matter is... In addition... Furthermore...
There is no doubt that…
I am absolutely certain that…



I´m not quite sure, but I think...
I haven´t thought about it before, but perhaps...
I don´t really know, but I imagine...
13) GATHERING YOUR THOUGHTS.
I’m now approaching the end of my presentation.
Well, this brings me to the end of my presentation.
As a final point, I would like to say…
Finally, I would like to highlight one key issue.
HOW TO STRUCTURE A MONOLOGUE
If you are preparing a monologue for an official oral test at the Official Language School or for another Official Institution like Cambridge University , The Institute of Modern Languages, the UNED or Oxford University, this explanation can be very useful for you. It is not just talk but to structure your speech correctly. So, the best advice is that you must use a series of phrases that give cohesion and quality to your monologue.
Here you have a guide that can be used by both students of B1 and B2 level.

1) YOU HAVE TO DIVIDE YOUR MONOLOGUE.

I’ve divided my presentation/speech/monologue/ into three/four main parts:
In my presentation/speech/monologue I’ll focus on three/four major issues.

Introduce your topic and give your listeners a brief outline of your presentation.
Develop all your important points.
Conclude your monologue by summing up your ideas.
TIPS FOR GIVING YOUR TALK: Be warm, friendly and enthusiastic.
ENGLISH ORAL EXAMS
3) INTRODUCING A POINT.
First of all, I would like to point out…
The main problem is…
The question of…
Speaking of…
First of all, I would like to say…

4) ENUMERATION OF POINTS (if you provide several reasons, factors or arguments in a row)
In addition to that…
Moreover, …
Furthermore, …
Another example of this is…
First, second, third…
Finally, …
5) MOVING TO THE NEXT POINT.
6) GOING BACK (to mention something you said earlier).
As I said/ mentioned earlier…
Let me come back to what I said before…
Let’s go back to what we were discussing earlier.
As I’ve already explained, …
As I pointed out in the first section, …
7) STATING SOMETHING AS A FACT.
As everyone knows…
It is generally accepted that…
There can be no doubt that…
It is a fact that…
Nobody will deny that…
Everyone knows that…
8) GIVING YOUR OPINION NEUTRALLY.
9) GIVING A STRONG OPINION.
10) EXPRESSING UNCERTAINTY 
I definitely doubt if that…
I am not sure that…
I am not certain that…
As far as I know…
11) GIVING REASONS
The reasons for this is (that)…
I base my argument on…
I tell you all  this because…
12) REPHRASING OPINIONS.(to explain something again if we think it is no clear)
What I meant to say was…
What I mean to say is ...
Let me put this another way .
Perhaps I’m not making myself clear…
The basic idea is…
One way of looking at it is…
Another way of looking at it is…
What I want to say is…
14) PLAYING FOR TIME.
I see. That´s a very interesting question.
Let me think... What I can say is...
Well... Is there anything else I can add to that?
I´m glad you asked me that question.
15) INDICATING THE END OF YOUR TALK.
The obvious conclusion is…
Last but not least…
The only possible solution/conclusion is…
In conclusion we can say that…
To cut a long story short, …
Just to give you the main points again, … (to sum up, in summary, altogether).
16) DRAWING CONCLUSIONS AND SUMMING UP.
TOPICS
Technologies.
Computers and the Internet.
Consumerism (online shopping, men v. women, the crisis, shopping habits, television commercials, shopping addiction, etc)
Crimes, law, politicians, corruption, public safety.
Inventions (past, present and predictions for the future, cloning, playing with DNA, Robotics, etc).
Medicine (traditional v. alternative, NHS = National Health System, lifestyle and health, etc).
Modern nature (cloning human beings, technological advances, genetic engineering, etc).
Communication and relationships (networks, online dating, etc).
Education
Money (the crisis, politicians, banks, governments, economic situation, 40-year mortgages,celebrities, sportspeople, etc)
Environment/ climate change/ global warming (carbon footprint – make sure you know what it is).
Job market (men v. women, unemployment, civil servants, etc ).
Travelling/ living abroad.
Food and healthy lifestyle (eating disorders, stress, eating habits, etc.).
The media (the news, newspapers, the radio, TV and children, reality shows, advertising, etc).
Charity (animal rights, famous people, governments, ways of raising money, etc.).
Appearance (cosmetic surgery, beautiful models and perfect bodies, television, etc.).
Work (parents and child raising, civil servants, men v. women, unskilled workers, immigrants, etc).
Family and relationships (present and past, changes, the elderly, marriage, etc).
Success (young age, celebrities, success and private life, work, stress, corruption, etc).
MORE TOPICS
Here you have some topics which could be useful for you to practice your oral skills. They are quite advanced topics intended to make students give their opinions and arguments on some current topics which affect society on their everyday life.
1. To what extent is the use of animals in scientific research acceptable?
2. Zoos are sometimes seen as necessary but not poor alternatives to a natural environment. Discuss some of the arguments for and/or against keeping animals in zoos.
3. Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country. Do you agree?
4. Children should never be educated at home by their parents. Do you agree or disagree?
5. In Britain, when someone gets old, they often go to live in a home with other old people where there are nurses to look after them. Sometimes the government has to pay for this care. Who should be responsible for our old people? Give reasons.
6. In some countries the average worker is obliged to retire at the age of 50, while in others people can work until they are 65 or 70. Until what age do you think people should be encouraged to remain in paid employment? Give reasons for your answer.
7. To what extent has the traditional male role changed in the last 20 years?
8. TV: could you be without it? Discuss.
9. Tourism is becoming increasingly important as a source of revenue to many countries but its disadvantages should not be overlooked. What are some of the problems of tourism?
10. Should children be taught sex education in schools?
11. Most high level jobs are done by men. Should the government encourage a certain percentage of these jobs to be reserved for women?
12. Are famous people treated unfairly by the media? Should they be given more privacy, or is the price of their fame an invasion into their private lives?
13. Will modern technology, such as the internet ever replace the book or the written word as the main source of information?
14. Should criminals be punished with lengthy jail terms or re-educated and rehabilitated using community service programs for instance, before being reintroduced to society?
15. Recycling is necessary. Do you agree or disagree?
Remember, if you really want to improve your English, you must practice as much as you can, even on your own, just to get fluency, as the saying goes
“practice makes perfect”
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