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How to Look at Art

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by

Aubrey Wood

on 7 September 2012

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Transcript of How to Look at Art

Eight Steps for Analysis How to Look at Art: Let the image blur
Eliminate the details
Note shapes and colors
Focus and un-focus eyes
What stands out? 1. Squint at It What do you see?
Turn your head
See simply abstract shapes
Eliminate representational meaning 3. Find the Negative
Space How does this define what's left? Why THIS moment?
Think photograph--what if several seconds + or - ?
Is it a defining moment in history or time? 4. Define
the Moment What does it look like
physically (layers, marks)? 5. Re-Construct It What draws your eye?
Where's the focus?
What's hard to focus on?
Trust the artist, yet make sure to see everything Let the Artist
Guide Your Eyes What do you recognize?
Label it to understand it 7. Say What You See Make sure to let the piece speak for itself though, too Use Background 2. Flip it Over 1. Squint at It 5. Re-Construct It 6. Let the Artist Guide Your Eyes 7. Say What You See 8. Use Background Information 4. Define the Moment 3. Find the Negative Space 2. Flip it Over What do you know
about the artist? Compare what you see to
what you know Consider historical context What's there beside the objects? Open space and empty hollows "Stuff between other stuff" How was it put together? What medium was used? Look at the craftsmanship Overall effect? What do you see now? The Starry Night (De sterrennacht) – Vincent van Gogh, 1889 The Starry Night (De sterrennacht) – Vincent van Gogh, 1889 Paranoiac Visage – Salvador Dali, 1935 Paranoiac Visage – Salvador Dali, 1935 Afternoon - Morris Kantor Rock Forms and Boats – Lewis Jean Liberté Liberty Leading the People – Eugène Delacroix, 1830 Poppy Field - Claude Monet, 1873 The Singing Butler - Jack Vettriano, 1992 Color Mood - De Hirsh Margules, 1946 Bonaparte Crossing the Alps - Hippolyte Delaroche, 1850 The Last Supper - Leonardo da Vinci, 1495-98 Subway Exit - O. Louis Guglielmi, 1946 Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I - Gustav Klimt, 1907 6. Did you notice the butler? Out loud! Sort out the visual confusion 8. Images courtesy of Creative Commons and the Art Interrupted Gallery Questions? Source: Art Interrupted Source: Art Interrupted Source: Art Interrupted Source: Art Interrupted Works Cited Fred, Sanders. "How to Look at Art." The Scriptorium. The Torrey's Honor Institute, 16 July 2007. Web. 06 Sept. 2012. <http://www.patheos.com/blogs/scriptorium/2007/07/how-to-look-at-art/>. Art Interrupted: Advancing American Art and the Politics of Cultural Diplomacy. 2012. Gallery of Art. Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art, Auburn University; Fred Jones Jr Museum of Art, University of Oklahoma; and the Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia. Auburn, Alabama. artinterrupted.org. Heaven and Earth Horse - Dee Teller City Street - Leonid Afremov Knowledge
1. Squint at It How to Look at Art 8. Use Background Information 7. Say What You See 6. Let the Artist Guide Your Eyes 5. Re-Construct It 4. Define the Moment 3. Find the Negative Space 2. Flip it Over
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