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Hallie Q. Brown

This is about Hallie Q. Brown.
by

Bevin Olson

on 13 December 2012

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Transcript of Hallie Q. Brown

By Bevin Olson Hallie Q. Brown Hallie's Life Hallie attended Wilberforce University and then
graduated in 1873 with a Bachelor of Science degree.
Then she started to teach on the plantations educating
the many African descent previous slaves whom she
came across.
A true force for change is what Hallie became with her
dedication to creating change through education. In her great efforts, she was one of the original founders
of the Colored Women's League of Washington, D.C.. The Rest of Hallie's Life Hallie helped found the National Association
Colored Women.She also started as a lecturer for
African American culture and temperance. Hallie's Death Hallie died in 1949.She was 104 years old when
she died. She died in Wilberforce,Ohio due to
coronary thrombosis.However,two buildings
are named after Hallie.Before Hallie died,she
wrote seven books. HOW CAN I MAKE Hallie Q. Brown was born on March 10, 1845 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Brown was one of the six children born to Frances Jane Scroggins and Thomas Arthur Brown, both of whom were actively involved in the Underground Railroad. She was a civil rights activist for African American women. An accomplished person (in a time when prejudice against African American women was rampant), she graduated from Wilberforce University in 1873 with a Bachelor's Degree in Science. Brown was the president of two organizations for African American women, The National Association of Colored Women and The Colored Women's League of Washington D.C. Brown was also the president of the Ohio Federation of Colored Women's Clubs from 1905 to 1912. She was the United States' representative in the 1899 International Congress of Women, and was active in politics, speaking at the 1924 Republican National Convention. In 1900 she was elected Secretary of Education for African Methodist Episcopal Church. Brown was also a representative at the Women's Missionary Society of the African Methodist Conference held in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1910.

Brown is known for her role in education as well. She was the dean of both Allen University and Tuskegee Institute, where she worked with Booker T. Washington. She taught at several plantations after she graduated, teaching African American children how to read and write. Brown taught at a night school for African Americans from 1887 to 1891. She then taught at a public school in Dayton,Ohio for four years and created an adult class for migrant workers. Her work in education prompted the National Association of Colored Women. to create the Hallie Q. Brown Scholarship.

Brown authored multiple books, including Homespun Heroines, and Other Women of Distinction, Tales My Father Told, and The Beautiful: A Story of Slavery. Homespun Heroines is a collection of 60 stories about notable African American Women. She was also a public speaker, and spoke before Queen Victoria at the 1895 Convention of the World's Women Christian Temperance Union. She died on September 16, 1949 of a heart attack. Brown was 100 years old.

Though she was not as well known as other civil rights activists, her work remains just as important to the movement for the rights of African Americans. She believed that all people should be equal, no matter their race or gender, and that one of the ways to accomplish that goal is through education. Knowledge, she affirmed, was the greatest equalizer in the world. This inspired her to learn, and then to teach others. She spoke out against inequality through her speeches and her books, and acted against it by helping those affected by it. She believed that if you were a person, you could do anything, and physical things shouldn't stop you. DIFERENCE? 1person can make a difference,no matter what they
are doing.For example,you now know about Hallie
Brown.What did Hallie do to make a difference?Think
about this question for a minute.Look over frames 4 and
5 if you don't remember.

So,have you thought about the question I asked you?
If you have,what did you think about?If you want to,
write this information down. Hallie Q. Brown Hallie Q. Brown was born in Pittsburgh,Pennsylvania. How can you make a difference in your
community? Have you ever tried signing
up as a volunteer, helping at a soup kitchen,
cleaned up a public park without being asked,
or even helped your elderly neighbor to
bring in their groceries or helped with their
lawn? All these concepts help those around
your community to lead better lives and
at the same time help you to promote a better
and happier place to live in. The start of such simple steps as I've relayed in
the prior are just the beginning of what you can
really accomplish though! As you get older, you can
begin like Hallie Brown did. You see, Hallie became
far beyond what many of her peers of the time did.
She was educated into college years as not only an
African American, but a woman in a time when 99%
of all college students were white and male. In most
regards it was almost unheard of for her to even
get to graduate at the time after the Civil War. She was born to Mary Scroggins and Thomas Brown.
Both parents were actively involved in the Underground
Railroad,which helped slaves to become free from being
owned.

Hallie's parents had had 4 children before she was born.Then after Hallie was born Mary and Thomas had
a sixth child.That is why Hallie was fifth of six children. 1 person can make a difference! If you want to do
some more research,
here are three websites
you can research on:

1. hallieqbrown.org
2.google.com
3.wikipedia.com THE END!!!!!!!!!!!!
Full transcript