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Collective action

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by

Tinne & Kaat Buelens

on 15 December 2014

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Transcript of Collective action

Collective action
FONTS
Can moral convictions motivate the advantaged to challenge social inequality?
extending SIMCA
General overview
Can moral convictions motivate the advantaged to challenge social inequality?
common identity or moral conviction?
Tinne Buelens
Filip Calders
Joachim Coosemans
Shauni Nuyts
Els Simillion

2
van Zomeren, Postmes, Spears, & Bettache (2014)
3
5
Collective action as the material expression of opinion-based group membership
Discussion
McGarty, Bliuc, Thomas, & Bongiorno (2009)
content & experiment
related theories
0
0
train strikes
group dynamics behind collective action
Collective action
disadvantaged groups
improve their group conditions
what?
SIMCA
the disadvantaged
the advantaged?
Social Identity Model of Collective Action
injustice
identity
efficacy
collective action
tendencies
.28
.21
.28
.26
.19
Why?
moral convictions
3 hypotheses
moral motivation hypothesis
identification hypothesis
SIMCA hypothesis
moral motivation hypothesis
48
procedure
results
93
procedure
results
moral motivation hypothesis
Collective action as the material expression
of opinion-based group membership
group-based anger
moral
conviction
collective action
tendencies
group efficacy
.38
.37
.34
.29
.45
group-based anger
moral
conviction
collective action
tendencies
group efficacy
.46
.31
.37
.13
identification with
the disadvantaged
.27
.06
.30
.32
4
Integration
WHY?
ferguson
2
Integration
guilt?
major harms
collective action
no motivation
guilt
depending on the
structure of the group
what is a group?
share: common social identification
perceive: same social category
bystander effect
other situations...
Cohesiveness reverses the bystander effect
shared opinion about equality
3
4
5
social categorization theory
group membership is subjective
relevant social category?
Michael Brown
shot by white policeman
racial tensions
identity-based motivation
Oyserman
how to behave
behave accordingly
salient group
part of the
identity
easier
1
Social Identity Theory
1
Social Identity Theory
Tajfel & Turner
social
interpersonal
intergroup
positive self-image
in low status group?
individual mobility
social creativity
social competition
group-based anger
moral
conviction
collective action
tendencies
group efficacy
.38
.34
.29
.45
identification with
the advantaged
.02
-.06
.00
.03
limitation
asymmetric groups
group-based anger
moral
conviction
collective action
tendencies
group efficacy
.42
.29
.21
moral motivation hypothesis
identification
moral conviction
identification with the disadvantaged
SIMCA
.06
research
limitations
taking part in collective action
where does moral conviction come from?
Discussion
1
Have you ever participated
in a collective action?
Were you ever involved in collective action to defend other people's rights, not your own?
What motivated the group?
b.
a.
What was your motivation?
Raise your hand if your worried about climate change
Why do you think people restrain from
protesting?
b.
a.
Did you ever participate in collective action?
group-based anger
moral
conviction
collective action
tendencies
group efficacy
.38
.34
.29
.45
identification with
the advantaged
.02
-.06
.00
.03
2
In both papers, universal values are mentioned.
Can we really talk about
universal
values?
3
Used measurement of attitudes:
are you in favor of of social equality or against it?
4
Is this a good measurement?
How would you improve it?
Are there disadvantaged groups in Belgium that are treated injust?
5
Which role is played by media in collective action?
Is media more likely to back up the
advantaged or the disadvantaged group?
6
A.
B.
Turner's definition + identity determined by shared opinion
- shared opinion against inequality
- sympathy for victims of inequality
Strikes
" the government is wrong!"
shared belief =
WWI
Relevance for collective action
identification with
working class?
their own nation?
Alternative explanations
Opinion based groups
opinion-based group
on gender equality
collective action
result of opinion-
based groups
4 phases of action mobilization
sympathy for a cause
target for mobilization
motivated to participate
overcoming barriers
Relation to 1st paper
advantaged
disadvantaged
share the same opinion
Collective identity
1
2
= shared status/relation
= distinct from personal identity
= distinct from ideological commitment
explanation for identification!
It is easier for women and men to work together to promote gender equality, or for people of different races to promote tolerance and acceptance, if members of both categories share a relevant opinion- based group membership.
Intervention
to reduce prejudice and promote commitment
- discuss a movement
- how to reach its goals?
+
consensus
+
create social change
advantaged
disadvantaged
formation of a moral community
why?
advantaged
disadvantaged
share the same opinion
Latané & Darley (1970)
diffused responsibility
social influence
motivate action
moral convictions
identification
personal
social
norm
moral status
transcend group
boundaries
"
"
Full transcript