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Hope is the Thing With Feathers

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by

Jay Ram

on 22 February 2011

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Transcript of Hope is the Thing With Feathers

hOPE Is the THiNg wITH feATHERS emILY dICkINSON fIRST Of aLL,
lET'S lOOk fROM A BROad OVeRVIeW tHiS POeM IS fULL
Of fIGURATIVe
LANgUAgE AND
sYMBOLiSm iT iS aLSO fULL of
LaNGUAgE STrUCTUReS
tHAt Add tO ThE
POEm'S OVeRaLL
eFFeCT nOtICE hOW aLL Of
THe StANZaS bUILd
ON ONe aNOThER "Hope" is the thing with feathers—
That perches in the soul—
And sings the tune without the words—
And never stops—at all— tHiS aUTOMATICAlly eSTaBLISHeS syMBOLISm... "hOpE" IS a tHINg WItH FeATHerS... wE See tHE aUtHOR IS COMPARiNg HOpE TO A bIRd... aND
REVeAlS "hOpE'S"
hOmE: tHE SOUl... aND "hOpE'S" PURpOSe: tO fOREVER sINg A TunE... bUT wHaT EXaCTLy iS tHiS tune...? tHiS tUnE COUld REPRESENT
EVeRy INDiViDUaL'S
pERSONaL eMOtIOn... !!ANGER!! sadness... JOY peace aLL tOgETHER CReATINg
a CONtINUOUS mElODy aND SWeeTESt - In tHE gALE - iS hEARD -
aNd SORe MUSt BE thE stORM -
tHAt COULd abASh THe LIttLE bIRD,
tHAT kEpT SO mANy WaRM - The first line symbolizes that hope is at its strongest, its sweetest, when things are at their worst... the second is directly stating that the storm, or cataclysm of any sort, must be wretched beyond imagination... and then it leads into the third line.... ...fOR ThE bIRD tO gIVE Up. tHiS line displays the
unhampered bird, the thing with feathers,
continuing its mission. The last line frankly states that hope has been held by many, though not necessarily everyone. I've Heard it in the chillest land, And oN tHe strAngesT Sea; yeT, NEVER, in eXtremitY iT asked A crumB of Me This last stanza tells of omnipresence of hope:
no matter how bleak the situation,
nO matter what difficulties present themselves,
no matter how strong the storm,
hope will selflessly inspire and strengthen anyone in need. But
there's
more
to
this
poem
Than
simply
imagery... The author does a marvelous job of using tools to enhace effect We clearly see... Personification parallelism a strong and steady
rhyme and rhythm The author gives the storm an ability to embarass the bird, and the bird the abilty to be emarrased.
In the final stanza, we see the bird "asks" for nothing in return, implying that it has the abilty to do so. The use of personification gives the poem the ability to relate on a more personal level with the reader. Being able to imagine how "Hope" interacts causes one to wonder more about it... The author establishes a clear flow to the poem... And sweetest,
and sore...
that could,
that kept This seems to give the poem life and movement, which further establishes "hope" a bird This acts as the backbone to the flow and life of the poem... The poem as a whole folllows one steady beat, almost like a bird flapping its wings... And every other end-word rhymes almost like the up and down motion of a bird's wings All of these further adds to the "life" of the "hope" and
together truly make hope... FLY OUT FROM THE PAGES... Metaphor BEsides the fact that the while peom is essentialy a metaphor comparing "Hope" to a bird, the author also compares the soul to a bird perch the same way This continues to give "Hope" lifelike features, and helps the reader to further relate to the meaning of the poem
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