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The Woodlands First Nations

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Kamaldeep Mundi

on 8 October 2013

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Transcript of The Woodlands First Nations

Thank you for listening! We hope you enjoyed and learned from our presentation!
The Woodlands First Nations
The Algonquins lived in wigwams. Wigwams were made of wooden frames that were then covered with woven mats and sheets of birch bark. It was made in a dome shape. They left a hole at the top to let smoke from the fire escape. The men would frame the house while the women would cover it. The Algonquins lived in wigwams because of their envirnoment. Since they lived in the woodlands, they had access to a lot of wood. They also had a lot of moose, deer and caribou. So that's what and where they lived!
The first form of transportation was by canoe. Their second form of transportation, snow shoes and toboggans. They used them in winter when the rivers and lakes were frozen and the snow shoes look like tennis rackets. The toboggans were usually pulled by humans. Also, a large team of sled dogs were required too. The Algonquins used this type of transportation because the people lived near lots of water. So they needed to build canoes to travel by water. So they built the canoes out of birch bark.
Tnteresting fact: With all the natural ways in the Eastern Woodlands, the people living there became skilled paddlers.
The Algonquins ate different types of food. They ate moose, deer and caribou. Also they ate roots, berries, nuts, fruits, ducks, geese, and syrup from maple trees, and in some areas, wild rice. They chose these foods because they were in their environment. Also they didn't have to go far to get them. Also since there were a lot of forests in the Eastern woodlands, there were lots of forest animals. (e.g. caribou)
Interesting Fact: The people who lived in the south woodlands mainly hunted and ate moose, deers, and bears. The people in the north mainly ate and hunted woodland

The clothing that the Algonquins wore was made out of caribou, moose and deer hide. Men wore tunics, leggings and lion cloths. The women dressed with the same materials but the order was different. Women wore tunics down to the knees or ankles. Fur bearing animals such as beaver, rabbit and muskrat were used for winter clothing. They wore this type of clothing to help keep them warm. Also, in very cold days during winter they would put more hide onto their bodies to keep them warm.
Hello, today we are going to talk about the Woodlands First Nations. We will talk about their clothing, food, shelter, hunting and transportation. Before we begin, the tribe that we were researched on is the Algonquian tribe.
The Algonquins killed animals with stone tipped spears. Also with bows and arrows. The Eastern Woodlands became very skilled hunters and fishermen because they lived in forested areas and were usually close to water. The most important to the Eastern Woodlands hunters was the white-tailed deer. It was hunted for it's meat, but the skins were also dried and used in making their houses. They also hunted raccoon, bear, squirrel, beaver, moose, seal, caribou and whale.
1) Canada Revisited Arnold Gibbs
2) Canadian School Thesaurus T.K. Pratt
3) First Peoples and First Contacts Daniel Francis
4) www.fourdiectionsteacings.com
5) www.firstpeoplesofcanada.com
Full transcript