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SC's EiE Learning Community Presents:

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Kelsey Dalrymple

on 17 March 2014

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Transcript of SC's EiE Learning Community Presents:

SC's EiE Learning Community Presents:


Presenters:
Rachel McKinney, Kara Pierson, & Kelsey Dalrymple


Guest Speakers/Contributors:

Education Programming in the Syria Response
Presentation created by Kelsey Dalrymple * Washington D.C. * March 18th, 2014
Turkey
Syria
Saudi Arabia
Iraq
Jordan
Egypt
Lebanon
Israel
History of the Syria Conflict
Civil war started in 2011 between government and those seeking to oust it
Violence ongoing for last 3 years

Education severely suffering
Numerous health risks
Increase in crime
Many human rights violations
Dangerous for aid workers
Over 100,000, including 7,000
children, killed
624,456*
953,420
226,934
135,031
582,080
North Africa
(Morocco, Algeria, Lybia)
19,697*
Regional Education Situation
Components of Educational Programming So Far...
UNICEF Back to Learning Campaign
Child-friendly & Youth-friendly Spaces
Provision of materials, school fees, & school facilities
Accelerated Learning Programs
Integration of refugee children into host-country schools
Formal & Non-Formal Education
Psychosocial Support
Lebanon
Jordan
Lebanon
2014 Regional Response Plan 6
Education
Protection
Livelihoods
Nearly 2.3 million children have
stopped
schooling in Syria

Over 60% of school-aged children in the region are
not
enrolled
Key Issues
School
expenses
Placement tests &
documentation
New curriculum &
different languages
of instruction
Quality
& relevance of education
Overcrowding
, which negatively affects host-country students already at risk
Certification &
accreditation
Parents fear their children, particularly girls, will be at
risk of harassment & discrimination
in/around schools

Response Plan Framework
Financial Requirement: $393.3 million
Key Activities
749,000 girls & boys will be supported in attending formal education
246,000 children will benefit from PSS in ed. settings
115,000 ed. personnel in host communities benefiting from training & capacity activities
Education
is a strategic response priority:
No Lost Generation Strategy
Increasing learning and skills
Providing a protective environment
Broadening opportunities for children and adolescents

No Lost Generation Strategy:

Provision of materials
ECCD
Incentives for enrollment
Advocacy for girls ed.
Prevention of S/GBV
School rehabilitation, safe learning
spaces, child/youth friendly spaces
Family tracing/reunification
Assistance for separated children
PSS
Awareness raising on child
protection, child labor, recruitment
Teacher training
Capacity building: gov., community,
parents, children...
Basic life skills, entrepreneurship,
literacy, etc.
Community outreach/organization
Resiliency interventions
Post-basic & higher ed.
Peace ed.
Language training
Support children with special needs
DRR
Enrollment & retention initiatives
Advocacy for accreditation &
recognition of attainment
Target # of Children Reached in 2014
Over 7,000 children have been
killed
in Syria

Nearly 8,000
unaccompanied
or
separated
children have been registered in host countries

Approx. 30,000 children engage in
labor
activities in Jordan alone
Accumulation of Risks to Syrian Refugee Children
Psychosocial distress
Displacement & family separation
Child labor, recruitment, & trafficking
Sexual and/or gender-based violence
Early marriage
Lack of support services
Lack of legal status & protection

Jordan, UNICEF
Response Plan Framework
Financial Requirement: $559.4 million
Key Activities:
Strengthening national & community-based child protection
mechanisms to prevent
& respond to abuse, violence, & exploitation
Increasing capacity to guarantee
early identification
of children at risk and onward referral to support services
Awareness-raising
to prevent violence in schools & public places
**
Child protection
is a strategic response priority
Only few host countries offer
full access
to labor market for Syrian refugees; labor policies vary between countries
Women & persons with disabilities
suffer more challenges in accessing the labor markets
Refugees must
compete with local populations
, often engage in unskilled labor
Child labor
is prevalent throughout region

Response Plan Framework
Financial Requirement: $273 million
Key Activities
1,045,000 Syrians and individuals in host communities will benefit from projects increasing livelihood, including through income generation or employment programs
**Not a strategic response priority
**No overt integration with education sector
Key Areas
Quality of Education
Young People
Teachers
Protection
Quality of Education
Protection
Teachers
Resources
. SaveNet & OneNet: Dashboards & Regional Response Strategy

. 2014 Regional Response Plan

. Syria Humanitarian Assistance Regional Response Plan (SHARP)

. No Lost Generation Strategy

. OCHA Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 43

. 2014 Education Under Attack Report

. Inter-Agency Regional Response

Questions?
Rachel McKinney
Director, EiE -- Save, US
rmckinney@savechildren.org

Kara Pierson
Senior Specialist, EiE -- Save, US
kpierson@savechildren.org

Kelsey Dalrymple
Consultant, EiE -- Save, US
kdalrymple@savechildren.org

Laetitia Lemaistre
Humanitarian Education Advisor -- Save, UK
L.Lemaistre@savethechildren.org.uk
Thank You!
Next Month:
Children with Disabilities & EiE
April 15th, 2014
Young People
6.5 million
IDPs*
Community Engagement
Relevance
Language
Curriculum
Attacks on Education
Protective Nature of Education
Intersections
Psychosocial Support
Integrative Models
Shift in reality = Changing goals & expectations
TVET & Entrepreneurship
Life Skills
Psychosocial
Self-Care
Teachers critical for success
Certification
Disenfranchisement
Education in Crisis: Providing Access to Education for Syrian Children in Lebanon
Laetitia Lemaistre
Humanitarian Education Advisor
Save the Children - UK
Syrian Population in Lebanon
962,000 registered /awaiting registration
53% children
550% increase in 12 months (from 160,000 to 915,000)
Population of Lebanon 4.2 million
14% living in informal settlements

Impact on Children
How are we responding in Lebanon in education?
ALP and support classes
Teacher Training
Teaching/Learning materials
School infrastructure improvement
Recreational activities

Challenges
Not reaching enough children in informal settlements/ great distances
Language acquisition/ Curriculum
Integration into school, bullying, discrimination
Teacher hours and classroom management

Second Shift
Truncated version of the Lebanese school curriculum that allows limited numbers of Syrian children into the formal Lebanese system
Ceiling of 40,000 Syrian children in the first shift
Secured funding/ ceiling for 30,000 in second shift
Estimated 400,000 children of school going age in Lebanon; the public education system and the Ministry’s ceiling thus fails to reach 327,000 Syrian children.

Challenges:
Segregating
Lebanese and Syrian children; Syrian children would have class in Lebanese school after Lebanese children finish;
Syrian children have fewer hours in the classroom – approximately half the hours of Lebanese children;
Teachers are overworked- working in already overcrowded classrooms during the first shift;

Community-Based Education
Quality formal basic education opportunities in an alternative, safe and protective environment, which is
designed, implemented and monitored by the communities
Addresses challenges of distance, limited spaces in second shift
Immediate solution for children in dispersed populations
Significantly lower unit cost
Community ownership
Provision of temporary learning space in a range of contexts
Seek accreditation


Consider
Regional perspective

Flexible Exit Strategy

Integration

ECCD/ Youth

Need enormous investment in school infrastructure rehabilitation:
Equipping classrooms
School libraries
Materials for children
Laetitia Lemaistre
Humanitarian Education Advisor
Save - UK

Save - US
*Figures are constantly rising (i.e. Currently Lebanon = 400,000 school-aged children & 327,000 not accommodated by formal school system)
Full transcript