Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Using Quotations

No description
by

Stacey Wigley

on 16 October 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Using Quotations

Using Quotations
Why Use Quotes?
Types of quotes
Options to Embed Quotes
Hamlet denies Rosencrantz’s claim that thwarted ambition caused his depression. He states, “I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space” (Hamlet 2.2).

Hamlet denies Rosencrantz’s claim that thwarted ambition caused his depression: “I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space” (Hamlet 2.2).

When faced with a twelve-foot mountain troll, Ron gathers his courage, shouting, “Wingardium Leviosa!” (Rowling, p. 176).

The Pirate King sees an element of regality in their impoverished and dishonest life. “It is, it is a glorious thing/To be a pirate king,” he declares (Pirates of Penzance, 1983).
Punctuation Rules
Because using quotes can help you argue with/ or extend your argument.
- using quotes can strengthen your argument by lending the support of an expert or authority.
-using quotes can add eloquence or power
What is a quote?
Quoting a source means that you are bringing the exact words of the source into your own writing.

Integrating quotations means “to weave the author’s words into your own sentences.”
- Use them sparingly so that you don't lose your own voice in the writing. It is an add on for your argument but not a replacement for your voice and ideas.

- Choose the very best quote to support your claim.

- Introduce your quote, indicate its significance, embed your quote and EXPLAIN how it supports your idea.

- Make sure the sentence with the quote is logical, grammatically correct and flows.
Embedded quotes
- These are words or short phrases that are integrated into your own sentence.

When Demetrius claims to love Helena, she reacts with disbelief and angrily screams out “O spite! O hell! I see you are all bent / To set against me for your merriment” (3.2.145-146). Her words suggest that she believes all of her former friends are conspiring against her.
Block quote: For quotations that are more than four lines of prose or three lines of verse, place quotations in a free-standing block of text and omit quotation marks.
Introduce each quote by describing the context of the quote.
After the quote, include your explanation. This is foundational to your argument because this sentence explains how the quote (evidence) supports your idea (claim).
Don't use quotation marks
Use a colon after your own words to set up a block quote
Start a new line AND iIndent block quote 10 spaces in from left margin
Use an ellipsis to show you have removed some of the quote's original content.
final punctuation goes at the end of the sentence and not after the page #
Incorporate the quote into your own sentence punctuating it as you would your own writing.

Mukherjee argues in favor of an acculturation model “that differs from both the enforced assimilation of a ‘melting pot’ and the Canadian model of a multicultural ‘mosaic’”(4).

Introduce a full-sentence quotation by using an attributive speech tag like “he writes,” “she claims,” and so on.

Jacob Needleman claims, “A dream is a vision or truth, of what can be and ought to be, and a dream is a deception.”

Use a full sentence of your own to introduce a full sentence by the quoted author. Use a colon.

Jacob Needleman says it best: “A dream is a vision or truth, of what can be and ought to be, and a dream is a deception.”




Commas and periods
go within closing quotation marks, EXCEPT when a parenthetical reference follows the quotation.

Jacob Needleman said, “A dream is a vision or truth, of what can be and ought to be, and a dream is a deception.”

In her essay, Dr. Linguist notes, "The gestures used for greeting others differ greatly from one culture to another” (3).


When
colons and semi-colons
are not part of the quotation, put them outside of the closing quotation marks.

At the English Department meeting, Ms. Balzer voiced her opinion on the rules for integrating quotations: “They’re not intuitive, but they are very important"; several other teachers agreed.

If a
question mark, exclamation point, or dash
is part of the original quotation, place it within the closing quotation mark.

Elaine Pagels asks, “Whom do we include in the ‘American Dream’ ?” (5).

If a
question mark, exclamation point, or dash
is part of your sentence that includes the quotation, place it outside of the closing quotation mark.  

Do other columnists agree with David Brooks’ claim that “maximum status goes to the Gladwellian heroes who occupy the convergence points of the Internet ecosystem” (2)?

parenthetical reference
TIPS to REMEMBER
Full transcript