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biotech and medicine of the future

biotech and medicine
by

sam coser

on 15 June 2010

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Transcript of biotech and medicine of the future

biotechnology and medicine of the
future Medical staff can learn the delicate procedure of spinal anaesthesia without practising on live patients, thanks to a new training device.
Human vertebrae are protected by a delicate gel like substance that is less than one inch thick.
Safely injecting the spine is very difficult; anaesthetists run the risk of damaging a patient's spinal column or the blood vessels that serve it.
It uses computer graphics and a virtual needle to realistically recreate contact with the spine.
The tool was developed by scientists at the University of Limerick, Ireland.
In the past, the procedure was fraught with danger, and medical staff learning the technique had to take extreme care not to damage patients' spinal columns.
According to the scientists, this is a major breakthrough in the process of teaching spinal anaesthesia, and could be used widely in hospitals within three years.
artifical pancreas for children with type one diabetes Scientists in Cambridge have shown
that an "artificial pancreas"
can be used to regulate blood sugar in
children with Type 1 diabetes.
A trial found that combining a "real time"
sensor measuring glucose
levels with a pump that delivers
insulin can boost overnight blood
sugar control.
The Lancet study showed the device significantly cut the risk of blood sugar levels dropping dangerously low.
Experts said the results were an important "step forward".
Type 1 diabetes is a chronic, life threatening condition, in which the pancreas does not produce insulin - the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels.
       
In total, 17 children and teenagers with Type 1 diabetes took part in the study over 54 nights in hospital.
Individually, the glucose monitoring system and the insulin pump used in the study are both already widely used and commercially available.
researchers haved moved closer to making silicon
chips which could on day repair damaged tissue in the
human body

The chip was then dipped in a patented mixture of proteins, and neurons grew along the patterns on the surface. The technique also works with stem cells.
It is hoped the method will eventually enable any type of tissue to be grown on a tailor-made pathway and implanted as prosthetic tissue in the body. Neurons are the basic cells of the human nervous system.
The scientists said the development may eventually enable chips to replace damaged nerve or muscle fibres.
They also said the development could possibly be used in the development of prosthetics in the future.
During the chip manufacturing process, the scientists printed patterns on the smooth silicon surface. Frimley Park Hospital in Surrey has agreed funding for the Da Vinci machine for colorectal, urological and gynaecological procedures.
The robotic device can be used by a doctor sitting at a computer screen.
The trust said the equipment would mean less pain, smaller incisions, less bleeding, a lower infection risk and quicker recovery for patients.
The robot interprets the users' movements from the controls and carries out the action on the patient. It can even counteract any trembling in the surgeon's hands. a surry hospital is to spend 1.6million on a robotic arm to make keyhole surgery less painful for paitents The trust said the equipment would mean less pain, smaller incisions, less bleeding, a lower infection risk and quicker recovery for patients.
The robot interprets the users' movements from the controls and carries out the action on the patient. It can even counteract any trembling in the surgeon's hands.
The trust's medical director Edward Palfrey said: "We have already embarked on a major upgrade of our operating theatres which when they are completed later this year will provide our patients with some of the best facilities available.
researchers have demonstrated that a tiny chip in silicon can diagnose diseases. Instead, the new device exploits capillary action, the tendency of fluids to climb through narrow channels - the same phenomenon that drives water into a sponge placed on a wet surface.
The speed with which blood is drawn through the chip can be controlled by the design of the micro-channels on the device. Those channels can be designed with incredible precision on a silicon chip. The device relies on an array of antibody molecules that are designed to latch on to the protein-based molecular markers of disease in blood.
The antibodies are chemically connected to molecules that emit light of a specific colour when illuminated - but only when they have bound to the disease markers. Researchers have demonstrated a tiny chip based on silicon that could be used to diagnose dozens of diseases.
A tiny drop of blood is drawn through the chip, where disease markers are caught and show up under light. The device uses the tendency of a fluid to travel through small channels under its own force, instead of using pumps. The initiative, dubbed Alerta DISAMAR, has allowed doctors in the navy to report disease outbreaks and ask for help with treatment.
The scheme was set up following the deaths of two Peruvian sailors in 2001 from malaria and is part of a wider mHealth project by the United Nations-Vodafone Foundation. since it was set up in 2003 it has provided invaluable information for epidemiologists and enabled them to track the spread of diseases.
It is also a useful way of gathering statistics on disease for health planning. To date, over 80,000 cases have been reported - everything from snakebites to yellow fever.
within ten years some doctors
and scientists are predicting that
all surgery could be scarless Within ten years some doctors and scientists are predicting that all surgery could be scarless.
They say by using the natural orifices of the body and the body's own natural scar the belly-button (or umbilicus), it will be possible to insert robots into the body which can help perform every surgical procedure.
It sounds fantastical, but prototypes are already in existence that can crawl and swim inside the body taking pictures of difficult to access areas.
Robots such as 'FreeHand', a robotic camera controller for minimally invasive surgery.
Traditionally the laparoscopic (keyhole) camera has been moved by an assistant, but the 'FreeHand' allows the surgeon to control the camera themselves using head movements and a foot pedal.
                       
Another example is the 'Da Vinci Robot' which is mainly used to carry out prostatectomies (removal of all or part of the prostate), tumour removals, gastro and neurological operations.
Its robotic arms rotate 360 degrees allowing surgeons more precision than they would have using their own hands.
The biotechnology of the future sounds intreging but i would like to know how will scientists prove that thier work will change the whole idea and break the limits of medicine.The future holdsbright new ideas for the world like silicon chips diagnosing many diseases and saving lives to me it sounds crazy but if it is proven that it can work then i will believe it. Researchers have apparently came closer to designing and making a silicon chip that will repair all damged tissue in the human body. The most stupid one that scientists are tring to prove that all surgery will be scarless i want to know how on earth will surgery be scarless when you have to open the body to sort out the problem out.
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mobile phone based health project is helping the peruvian
military to keep the disease at bay, this disease ranges from
snake bites to yellow fever mobile phone based health project is helping the peruvian
military to keep the disease at bay, this disease ranges from
snake bites to yellow fever Medical staff can learn the delicate procedure of spinal anaesthesia without practising on live patients, thanks to a new training device. researchers have demonstrated that a tiny chip in silicon can diagnose diseases. a surry hospital is to spend 1.6million on a robotic arm to make keyhole surgery less painful for paitents researchers haved moved closer to making silicon
chips which could on day repair damaged tissue in the
human body artifical pancreas for children with type one diabetes within ten years some doctors
and scientists are predicting that
all surgery could be scarless which one do you think is most believable
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