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Copy of Copy of Safety and Security Manual

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Tara Arthur

on 12 May 2015

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Transcript of Copy of Copy of Safety and Security Manual

Basic Security Awareness
design by Dóri Sirály for Prezi
Where to Start?
Vehicle Safety and Awareness
Are you new to safety and security awareness, an experienced pro at being safe and aware, or perhaps somewhere in between? Great! This presentation is a resources for all experience levels.
is the the knowledge and practice that give you the ability to assess your environment for dangers and help to promote your safety and security as well as the safety and security of those around you.

What is Awareness?
Awareness
Awareness Steps
Security cannot be achieved simply by organizing a collection of policies and procedures-it must become part of how we think about, plan and conduct programs.


ChildFund has Safety & Security Policies, Procedures and Guidelines.
Carjacking
Car Jackings can occur anywhere but are most common at checkpoints, road intersections and other locations that require drivers to slow or stop.
Staff should avoid potential trouble spots and take immediate action when threatened.
+Vary routes and time of travel. Avoid developing patterns.
+ Avoid areas with criminal activity or known threats and consult the NO safety and security focal point.
+When possible, have contact other agencies operating in the area to maintain awareness of current situation along routes and consult the NO safety and security focal point. Consider convoy travel with another agency.
+If approaching a suspicious area, stop well before the area to observe other traffic passing through it. This is especially useful for "unofficial" checkpoints.
+ Mark the vehicle appropriately for the area. In most cases, it is advantageous to have ChildFund placards clearly visible. Consider magnetic placards to allow flexibility.
+ Keep doors locked and windows up.
+ Leave space to maneuver around the vehicle in front of you.
+ Heavy traffic does not allow the carjacker the opportunity to escape- the likelihood of a carjacking attempt is increased in light-moderate traffic conditions.
+ If possible keep the vehicle moving and accelerate out of the area.
Sexual Assault
Everyone is a potential victim of sexual assault.
Victims are usually pre-selected and the perpetrator is most often an acquaintance. Preventive measures can reduce the likelihood of becoming a target of opportunity, since the offender will usually wait until the potential victim is vulnerable or isolated.
Strategies for Avoidance:
+ Avoid walking or driving alone, particularly at night
+ Avoid isolated, unsafe or poorly lit locations
+ Avoid bars or clubs where crime is known to take place
+socialize in groups rather than on your own
Survival & Types of Resistance:
+ Passive resistance - do or say anything to dissuade the attackers desire to force contact with you
+ Active Resistance: shout for help; use an alarm; run away if there somewhere safe to run; fight back
+ No Resistance- if you sense there is no safe alternative, offering no resistance in an attempt to survive and minimize the physical harm that is done may be an option
Should a sexual assault transpire; under no circumstances will a victim be pressured to decide a course of action that s/he does not want to pursue.

Electrical Shock
from google search: electrical shock 11/11
In the event of electrical shock take the following immediate actions:
1) Summon assistance and sound the alarm
2) Safely remove the electrical source, either by the cut-off switch or unplugging the equipment [if possible]
3)DO NOT approach or touch a person being shocked
4) Use a rope, broom handle or non-metal object to move victim away from source of electricity
5) Begin aid once the victim is in a safe area or electricity is turned off
6) Extinguish any fires present
7) Administer first aid, including CPR if necessary and continue until help arrives
from google search: electrical shock 11/11
Confrontation, Robbery and Assault
Did you know
that a
respectful demeanor
during confrontation may avoid further escalation and in some cases
calm a hostile
? Armed assailants are most like to attack when they feel their own safety is threatened.
When faced with armed robbery or threats, consider this:
^
Do not try to intimidate or be aggressive. Instead maintain a polite, open and confident demeanor and try not to show anger or fear
^
Keep hands visible and move slowly with precise gestures
^
Respond to requests but do not offer more than requested
^
Never take physical risks in defense of property or money
^
Speak distinctly and try to deescalate the situation
^
If in a group, do not talk among yourselves more than necessary, particularly in languages not understood by assailant(s)

When safe,
remember
to report
incidents

Medical Emergencies
+Look around for what may have caused the situation and check for potential threats to the responder. Is it safe to render aid? If relevant, check the attitudes of bystanders and assess your personal safety in waiting for authorities.
Secure the Area:
Summon Aid
+ Call for help or ask a bystander to get help and make sure they understand your request.
+ Call the National Office, other staff, or the appropriate authorities.
+ In remote areas where it may be hours before someone else is able to provide assistance, if possible, be sure to notify someone prior to starting any type of aid.
Kidnapping, Abduction and Hostage Situations
Abduction:
The time of actual abduction is the most dangerous. The kidnappers are nervous, and the victim may not realize what is happening. Escape should not be considered except in very rare circumstances and only if staff are confident the attempt will be successful. Escape attempts often lead to injury or death. The victim should remain as calm as possible, particularly when being transported. Talking to the kidnappers is recommended, provided this does not make them more nervous.
DO NOT
^
DO NOT
adopt a belligerent, hostile, or sullen attitude.
^
DO NOT
enter into conversations on controversial subjects, such as politics and religious beliefs (unless shared by the captors).
^
DO NOT
allow yourself to become either fatalistic/ hopeless or over-optimistic.
^
DO NO
T attempt physical violence or engage in verbal abuse of captors.

Reacting to Gunfire & Ambush
When Walking:
a surprise attack from a concealed position, places a vehicle or convoy at an extreme disadvantage.
During an ambush;
- If possible,
continue to drive forward
under control at the highest speed possible [it is difficult to hit a moving target; the faster it moves, the more difficult it becomes]
- If the firing is coming from the front,
attempt to veer left or right
up a side street (in a town) or, if in the countryside, off to the side (but do not leave paved road). Reversing or turning around is not recommended. [The slower vehicle presents an easier target]
-
If the vehicle is immobilized
,
get out
, keeping behind the vehicle away from the source of firing for added protection and concealment. Take the first available protection, then consider moving to better protection if nearby.
Hard cover
, such as a
ditch, rocks or a building
, provides the best protection
- If the driver has been shot, attempt to control the vehicle from your position.
NEVER STOP DRIVING
, unless there is no choice. If you must stop, leave the vehicle quickly and seek shelter away from it. Do not stay near the vehicle
In areas where ambushes are known to occur, extra security precautions and communication procedures are strictly enforced.
Ambush,
- Take immediate cover
- Try to stay calm; Do not panic and run
- Determine direction of gunfire
- If possible crawl to any nearby protection, such as a ditch or a hole inside a building (even a curb can serve as protection)
- Observe the actions of others nearby and react accordingly
- Leave the scene only when it is safe to do so or after firing has completely stopped
contact authorities and or the office immediately
When in a structure
-
Stay low and away from windows and doors and move to the interior of the building.
- Take shelter in the best protected areas, such as a bathroom, in the tub, the basement, under a stairwell, or behind a solid wall.
- If possible, contact the appropriate authorities for assistance.
When in a Vehicle

- Keep windows slightly opened and radio at low volume (so you can hear)
- If the firing is ahead, but is not directed at the vehicle (as it would be in an ambush), stop immediately. Reverse and when feasible, turn around and drive to a safe area, remaining on the hard surface roads or driving back on the same tracks (dirt roads and roadsides may be mined).
- If firing is somewhere other than directly ahead, or if the direction cannot be determined, stop immediately and take cover outside the vehicle (unless in a minded area). Keep keys and communication equipment
- If possible, crawl to any nearby protected area. Never take shelter under a vehicle
If a grenade is thrown or rolls nearby, there are only a few seconds in which to act
Reacting to a Grenade
Remember TURN, STEP, FALL. Take the following immediate actions:
Yell, turn away from the grenade and take one step.
Drop face down on the ground and cross legs, keeping them straight with feet pointing towards the grenade. Keep arms straight along the body. Do not look back at the grenade.
There is less chance of injury for people flat on the ground than those upright or running.
If there is no explosion within 30 seconds, stay low, crawl to a safe area and notify the appropriate authorities. Do not go back to the area, and prevent others from doing so.

Never attempt to pick up and throw or kick a grenade away!
Do not attempt to run to shelter. Grenade fuses last only a few seconds, and the blast range is approximately 30 meters in all directions, so running is useless.
Staff will be given a pre-arrival briefing by the NO before traveling and will be given an orientation upon arrival at their destination.
This is done to ensure staff know the current context and environment of the country to which they are visiting.

The safety and security of ChildFund staff must be balanced with the need of those we serve. If at any point staff is or will be placed in to much danger ChildFund can withdraw staff from that nation or refuse to work there.

The lives of ChildFund staff is more important than the equipment and supplies delivered by ChildFund’s programs. Staff should never place their lives at risk to protect those assets.

Staff members must comply with the safety requirements of ChildFund and obey all traffic laws and regulations of host country. Following these precautions can mitigate accidents and or damage.
In order to protect the lives of staff members, offices will have completed plans for evacuation, relocation, and hibernation. Staff must follow these instructions should a security event occur.

Evacuation, Relocation and Hibernation

Evacuation is the movement of staff across country borders

Relocation is the movement of staff within country

Hibernation is when staff remains in place to wait out the hazard/disaster effecting them--this is also known as "shelter in place"

All offices should have plans for evacuation, relocation and hibernation

Staff must comply and immediately follow the instructions of their senior staff members during an evacuation, relocation or hibernation
2.5.7 No Right to Remain: ChildFund can make the ultimate decision to remove its staff from any country in order to protect the lives of staff
Personal Conduct:
Understand and respect the cultural environment (customs & dress code).

Be alert & take precautions

Always look presentable, clean & tidy

Follow all recommended health precautions

Remember that your conduct reflects on the image of the organization

Keep calm and don't panic when confronted with an emergency or a dangerous situation

Avoid political discussions

Avoid being drawn into relationships that might carry personal obligations or expectations
Health

A simple health check list
- Get all vaccinations that you might need before traveling. You must always be covered for typhoid, diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis

- Vaccination Card: Always carry vaccination documentation as some countries require this upon entry [For a list of Yellow Fever vaccine requirements visit the World Health Organization site: who.int]


When Traveling
Key resources

Be sure to visit state.gov.travel for US updates and travel warnings
Other countries also provide this information. Contact the Global Safety and Security team for details


Things to Remember:
+ Always register travel on the HUB
+ Visit state.gov.travel for updates and travel warnings
+ Sign up for the Safe2Go app
+ Check out pre-arrival briefings
+ Maintain a low profile, don't hang out in public areas; get through security as fast as possible
+ Be sure to carry your emergency contact list located in your PEG. The PEG for a given country can be obtained from the safety and security focal point and is usually included in the countries pre-arrival briefing
--
I avoid displaying jewelry, cash, and valuables
When carrying backpacks or purses they are kept close to the body
Remember to register your travel on the Hub and with your embassy. Be sure to know key and emergency contact information


https://www.ccfhub.org/Groups/GlobalPrograms/SafetyAndSecurity/Pages/default.aspx
Keep money, credit cards and passport (if needed) in your front pockets, not a purse or bag. *Always carry the address and phone number of your hotel
- Notify others of travel times and destinations
- Dress modestly regardless of country of travel
- If you find yourself needing assistance in English, in some areas, you may consider asking someone at a restaurant


Travel Tips
,
Fire
Immediate Action for Fire Response:
Simple improvements in fire and electrical safety and first aid training and procedures can safeguard all staff and should be included in any office security plan. Individual staff members, even when traveling, should make every attempt to adhere to commonsense precautions concerning fire and electrical safety. Staff members should take advantage of fire and electrical safety training and include family members.
+Sound the alarm. Yell for help, summon aid, activate the fire alarm, etc. Do not attempt to fight the fire until the building evacuation is initiated.
+ Determine the cause of fire and what is available to fight it. If it is an electrical fire, it is important to first turn off the electricity, if possible.
+
Attempt to fight
the fire but under no circumstances risk injury in the process.
+ If successful,
continue monitoring
the site to prevent flare-ups until help arrives.
+ If unable to fight the fire,
evacuate quickly,
closing doors and windows, if possible, ensuring no one remains in the building.
+
Direct response
personnel to the scene and give information to firefighters when they arrive.
+ Ensure all staff are accounted for.
+ Treat the injured if any.
+ All NO should have a designated collection point.
[Be sure to read the full Organizational Safety and Security Guidelines and policy found on the hub]
The purpose of these guidelines is to assist in improving the safety and security of ChildFund
staff and operations globally.
Every staff member has an obligation to learn and understand the security situation where they are located. International staff members, in particular, have a responsibility to become familiar with the political, social and cultural features of their assigned country.
+ All vehicle occupants must wear seat belts at all times, in the front and rear of the vehicle.
+ Do not speed or drive too fast for conditions.
+ Observe local driving laws and regulations.
+ Take extra precautions when driving through rural villages or on underdeveloped roads with pedestrians on the roadway.
+ Avoid night driving or driving alone.
+Avoid letting the fuel tank fall below half full.
+ Keep a spare vehicle key in the office.
+ Never voluntarily carry unauthorized passengers, especially armed actors [soldiers/police].
+ Keep doors locked. Open windows no more than 5 cm and only those windows near occupied seats.
+ Know where the vehicle safety and communication equipment is and how to use it.
+ Know how to perform basic vehicle maintenance (changing a flat, checking and adding fluids, etc.)
+ Motorcycle drivers and riders should wear helmets at all times.
Motorcycle drivers and riders should wear helmets at all times. Use visibility vests when riding a motorcycle
Immediately upon hire and/ or prior to undertaking an overseas assignment, as part of their induction all staff, regardless of position, receive information on known threats present in the area of assignment and acknowledge that they have been informed of the known risks. In the case of staff traveling, the office being visited is responsible for providing a pre-arrival briefing in written and/or verbal forms detailing known threats a traveler may encounter and any necessary mitigating/ coordinating measures.
Review
page 82
of GSS Guidelines for more information
Review Page 93
and chapter 5
of the GSS
Guidelines
Review Pg. 102, 115 and Chapter 6 (6.5)
GSS Guidelines
To reduce the likelihood of a medical emergency while abroad, international staff should receive a comprehensive medical and dental examination prior to overseas assignment.

Review Pg 58, 63, 76 (4.5) and chapter 4 & 6 of GSS guidelines
When a staff member encounters a medical emergency, the desire is strong to rush in and begin first aid. In most cases, staff are familiar with the initial actions for first aid: establish an airway, ensure the victim is breathing and check for circulation problems, such as no pulse or excessive bleeding. However, in many situations, such as in remote areas or regions with instability or conflict, there are steps to take before beginning first aid. Rushing in may mean that the responder becomes a second victim. These initial steps take only a few seconds:
Review Chapter Pg. 114 and Chapter 6, 6.4 GSS Guidelines
To report any incident please also visit the https://www.ccfhub.org/Groups/GlobalPrograms/SafetyAndSecurity/Pages/default.aspx
•The victim should not shower or douche and should preserve the clothing worn during the attack to prevent loss of possible evidence for prosecution.
• Though it may be difficult, the attack should always be reported to the appropriate authorities. NOs should have someone (preferably same-sex) accompany the victim to the hospital to provide support during the examination and reporting process. The medical examination should include tests for sexually transmitted diseases (preferably by doctor of the same sex). Ultimately the decision to report the crime is the victims. Staff choosing not to report an incident to authorities will have their wishes respected.
• In most cases, the police will conduct an investigation, which will include questions about the circumstances
of the event. Again, leaders must ensure that procedures are in place to ensure preservation of the victim’s confidentiality, legal and human rights, and respect of privacy and dignity.
• ChildFund will recommend and facilitate counseling for all victims of sexual assault if desired. Mid and long-term follow-up care must be ensured (if desired), whether the victim remains in the operational area or transfers to another location.
• Any wish on the part of the victim to leave the operational area should be fully supported.
• Always consult the victim before any follow up steps are taken.
• Taking the necessary measures to ensure victim confidentiality, the Safety and Security Focal Point or Manager should complete an incident report form. In some areas there will be a method of sharing general, non-personal safety and security incident information within the NGO community. This is an important step to prevent others from becoming victims.
• Training is available from the Global Safety and Security Team for offices or staff wishing to obtain additional training in prevention and responding to sexual assault.
Injuries and property loss from fire and electrical shock are far more common than from crime or instability. Most can be avoided if the office implements simple safety procedures and a regular schedule of inspection. These procedures make up the Fire and Electrical Safety Plan, which should be updated yearly. Regular drills should be incorporated in this plan.
Review Pg. 58, 104 Chapter 3 of GSS Guidelines
The electrical condition of many offices and residences can be considered poor, with overloaded circuits, poor maintenance and inferior wiring. This can increase the risk of electrical shock or fire.
Measures to improve electrical safety include:
• Conduct regular inspections of residences and office spaces and correct electrical discrepancies.
• Locate and mark the electrical cut-off for all offices and residences.
• The cut-off should be kept free from obstruction, should never be in a locked space, and everyone
should be made aware of its location.
• Smoke detectors. When available, smoke detectors should be placed in every room of a building,
where there is cooking or a heat source (lounges with microwaves, coffeepots, kitchens, etc.) and
by the main electrical circuit box. Detectors should be tamper resistant, ideally using a sealed power
source to prevent battery theft.
Review Pg. 104, 106, 110 Chapter 6 (6.1) of GSS Guidelines: Annex A: Safety and Security Assessment Checklist provides guidelines for ensuring a safe living and working environment. Minimum general guidelines include:
Fires in buildings can spread quickly, trapping people inside. It is important to respond immediately to any
fire alarm or evacuation order. Staff should plan ahead and learn the emergency exit routes from residences and offices. When in hotels or traveling, look for the suggested evacuation route and rehearse it (even if only
mentally).
Stop, Drop, Roll (Pg. 111)
Review Pg. 127 and Chapter 7 GSS Guidelines
Circumstances that might require evacuation or relocation of the staff and/or their families include mounting terrorist activities and threats, insurrection and other civil disorder, or a sudden crisis such as a natural disaster. In most cases, the National Director, in consultation with the Regional Director and Director, Global Safety and Security, will make the final decision to evacuate. In the event time or communication difficulties make coordination impossible, the National Director has the authority to order and conduct an evacuation. Evacuation should be considered as a last resort after efforts to resolve or mitigate potential threats are unsuccessful. In the planning process it is essential that all staff members clearly understand their eligibility for evacuation assistance. In most cases, only international staff and families will be evacuated.
Use caution when taking taxis in areas where cab drivers are known to be involved in criminal activity. When available, take licensed taxis and always settle on the fare before beginning the trip. Have the destination address written out in the local language to show the driver if necessary.
Review Pg. 90 and Chapter 5 (5.5;5.7) GSS Guidelines
National Offices can provide information on which taxi companies are best and which should be avoided
After getting off any public transport, check to be sure no one is following
ChildFund will use reasonable, appropriate and ethical means to secure the release of the staff member(s). ChildFund will provide all possible support to the staff member’s family during the period of the incident.
Review Pg. 123 and Chapter 6 (6.13) GSS Guidelines
The Global Safety and Security Team is available to provide training and information to staff and offices that may be affected by these scenarios. Additional guidance for CMT members is provided.
Kidnapping, Abduction and Hostage Situations
^
Remain calm.
If capture is inevitable, accept it and follow orders.
^
Recognize captivity
as a fact and mentally accept the change of status and circumstances.
^
Give captors
details of any necessary medical treatment.
^
Accept and eat food
that is given, even if it is unpalatable.
^
Prepare mentally
for a long wait, perhaps many months, before release.
^
Adopt an attitude
of discrete skepticism toward information passed by captors.
^
Plan a daily program
of activity, including daily physical exercise, and adhere to it.
^
Try to keep a record
of the passage of time.
^
Take advantage
of any comforts or privileges offered by the captors, like books, newspapers or access to the radio. If not offered, ask for them.
^
Keep as clean
as circumstances permit.
^ Ask for adequate washing and toilet facilities.
^ If possible, develop a good rapport with captors and try to earn their respect. Seek to
“humanize” yourself to the captors.
DO NOT:
^
DO NOT
adopt a belligerent, hostile, or sullen attitude.
^
DO NOT
enter into conversations on controversial subjects, such as politics and religious beliefs (unless shared by the captors).
^
DO NOT
allow yourself to become either fatalistic/ hopeless or over-optimistic.
^
DO NO
T attempt physical violence or engage in verbal abuse of captors.

ChildFund will use reasonable, appropriate and ethical means to secure the release of the staff member(s). ChildFund will provide all possible support to the staff member’s family during the period of the incident.
Review Pg. 123 and Chapter 6 (6.13) GSS Guidelines

DO
^
Remain calm.
If capture is inevitable, accept it and follow orders.
^
Recognize captivity
as a fact and mentally accept the change of status and circumstances.
^
Give captors
details of any necessary medical treatment.
^
Accept and eat food
that is given, even if it is unpalatable.
^
Prepare mentally
for a long wait, perhaps many months, before release.
^
Adopt an attitude
of discrete skepticism toward information passed by captors.
^
Plan a daily program
of activity, including daily physical exercise, and adhere to it.
^
Try to keep a record
of the passage of time.
^
Take advantage
of any comforts or privileges offered by the captors, like books, newspapers or access to the radio. If not offered, ask for them.
^
Keep as clean
as circumstances permit.
^ Ask for adequate washing and toilet facilities.
^ If possible, develop a good rapport with captors and try to earn their respect. Seek to
“humanize” yourself to the captors.
No single defensive measure, or combination of measures, will prevent or effectively counter all ambushes in all situations. Immediate actions during an ambush should be adapted to the local situation. For example, in some areas it may not be advisable to drive forward when attacked as the assailants may have placed a trap in that direction. As with any threat, careful analysis will indicate potential vulnerabilities and protective measures to be implemented
Review Pg. 117 and Chapter 6 (6.7-9) GSS Guidelines
Review Pg. 119 and Chapter 6 (6.10) GSS Guidelines
For information on explosive incidents see Pg. 120 Chapter 6 (6.11)
ChildFund operates on a needs versus risks basis. The work that can be achieved must always outweigh the risks taken, and staff should not work in circumstances where the risks to their safety and security are greater than the needs of the population. ChildFund will withdraw from or decline to work in areas where the security situation no longer allows it to meet its objectives.
Everyone, regardless of age, background or experience, will experience stress in ambiguous, austere, hostile, dangerous or insecure environments. Fear is a natural response to danger and, if ignored or suppressed by individual staff or managers, may lead to psychological and/ or physiological damage. It is recognized that responses to stress vary according to surroundings, perceptions and sensitivities. The National Director (or other appropriate senior staff), if required, will review any situation involving an employee’s reaction to extraordinary stress on an individual basis. This will be done without prejudice to that person’s professional continuance with ChildFund. At the conclusion of fieldwork, or earlier if necessary, the National Director may recommend that staff individually or as a group receive psychological counseling and assessment. Additionally, any staff member can (and should) identify their need for assistance if needed.
Stress
Medical Evacuation
Medical evacuation is used when there is an emergency illness or injury in an area where local medical assistance or emergency/ hospital care is unavailable or inadequate. It is appropriate when failure to obtain immediate care will likely place the patient’s life in jeopardy or lead to serious physical impairment. If all conditions for medical evacuation are met, the National Office (or other office depending on the circumstance) should arrange passage through an in-country evacuation system, a scheduled commercial flight, or through the appropriate private international evacuation insurance provider (varies by location). Eligibility for medical evacuation will vary by location and all staff should be briefed on their access to it on assignment.
Review Pg. 12 and chapter 1 GSS Guidelines
Welcome Back from your travels Mr. PEAR!
PEAR and his colleagues are continuing to monitor any negative effects from his travels
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Review Pg. 115 and chapter 6 (6.6) GSS Guidelines
For questions contact the Global Safety and Security Team
Be sure to review the Organizational Safety and Security Guidelines as needed.
ChildFund International acknowledges that staff may be placed at risk due to the nature and character of its work in changing operating contexts. Staff safety and security is an organizational and individual responsibility. Proactively managing risks and adherence to set safety and security policy and procedures help staff to work safely and securely by preventing incidents or minimizing the impact of those that occur despite the prevention measures.
2.2. ChildFund International believes that adequate safety and security depends on risk-reducing behavior of staff. All staff are required to model reasonable risk-reducing practices to address threats and vulnerabilities in the work environments and adhere to set organizational policy and procedures.
2.3. ChildFund International considers risk assessment an essential component of its safety and security policy and shall be carried out in its program design, during implementation, and evaluation of programs; and as part of the decision-process for opening new offices, establishing operations in new areas, or new acquisition/continued use of premises.
2.4. ChildFund International approach safety and security events as a matter of serious concern that requires prompt attention from managers and specialized guidance for mitigation and interventions. ChildFund International officers are required to follow set guidelines and standard protocols for reporting, analysis, and interventions.
2.5.6 Right to Withdraw
Staff retain their inherent right to make decisions about their own safety and security at all times and therefore have the right to decline to remain in a place, to undertake assignment or travel if they feel it places

them in jeopardy. If staff feel they are in danger they must report the condition/ circumstances and should leave, cancel or postpone or modify travel or work schedules until the condition is adequately addressed or resolved. While in emergency circumstances staff do not need advanced approval to leave or avoid a situation they feel is dangerous, they are required to notify and report the situation to management as soon as possible.


This applies not only at the project level within a given country but to all ChildFund offices and activities globally.
2.5.10 Explosive Remnants of War
No staff member will work in areas with known or suspected landmine or unexploded ordinance (UXO) contamination without first receiving appropriate training from a reputable source. As ordinance and techniques of employment vary by context, training should be tailored to the context in which the staff member will be operating.

2.5.11 Threatening Communications
All threats directed at ChildFund staff and/ or operations must be taken seriously. The affected ChildFund office should initiate all security precautions within their scope and report the threat immediately to appropriate authorities and the Director of Global Safety and Security for evaluation. Efforts must be made to preserve and maintain the evidentiary value of any electronic media (such as SMS messages or emails) or documentary evidence (such as letters, notes or graffiti).

2.5.12 Transportation
Vehicle accidents are a major cause of injury and fatality for NGO staff. Seat belts front and rear will be worn at all times by all ChildFund staff while in a vehicle. No vehicle will be procured if it is not equipped with seatbelts.

Staff operating motorcycles in the course of their employment must be provided personal protective equipment to include a helmet and visibility vest. No vehicle (including motorcycles) will be operated by ChildFund staff if it is not equipped with a first aid kit appropriate to the environment and a fire extinguisher. All drivers employed or contracted by ChildFund and all staff who operate vehicles must be properly licensed and insured for the vehicle being operated and must abide by all local traffic laws and regulations.

2.5.13 Weapons
Under no circumstances will ChildFund employees carry or possess weapons or ammunition while on assignment for ChildFund. All ChildFund offices shall enforce a “No Weapons” policy, prohibiting weapons in offices or vehicles.

2.5.15 Disciplinary Action
Failure to follow security or safety policies, procedures or guidelines is a disciplinary matter and may lead to dismissal-or-other-disciplinary-action.

4.1 Individual Staff Members: Are the primary persons responsible for their safety and security. Every staff member has a responsibility to learn and understand the security situation, political, social and cultural features of the context in which they are located, working in and/ or journeying to; and refrain from inappropriate or offensive behavior that can impair operations and jeopardize staff.
All staff must recognize that they are responsible and accountable to one another for compliance with this policy, associated procedures and security plans in their area of assignment. Staff are required to remind others (at any level in the organization) of applicable policies and procedures when they observe non-compliance.
All staff are required to inform their immediate supervisor of any safety or security incident or condition that impacts or has the potential to impact staff, operations, assets or reputation of ChildFund as soon as is practical, but in no case later than 24 hours after the event.
Additional responsibilities are contained in the procedure.

2.5.14 Evacuation, Relocation and Shelter in Place
If staff are instructed to evacuate, relocate or seek shelter in place by their supervisor or senior staff member, they must do so immediately. In the event of a security evacuation or relocation, ChildFund will endeavor to move staff to a safe location or home of record (if eligible) if the evacuation is prolonged.

2.5.8 Armed Guards and Escorts
Generally, ChildFund does not employ or accept the imposition of armed guards at any of its offices/ activities. However, there are occasions when armed guards or escorts may be approved by the Director of Safety and Security in consultation with the EVP Program when they are the only available way to protect the security of staff or enforced by the competent authorities.

2.5.1 Orientation and Informed Consent:
Immediately upon hire and/ or prior to undertaking an overseas assignment, as part of their induction all staff regardless of position receive information on known threats present in the area of assignment and acknowledge that they have been informed of the known risks. In the case of staff travelers, the office being visited is responsible for providing a pre-arrival briefing in written and/or verbal forms detailing known threats a traveler may encounter and any necessary mitigating/ coordinating measures. In some high risk locations, pre-travel approvals will be required as per set procedures. Staff receiving information are required to acknowledge receipt in a traceable way.

https://www.ccfhub.org/Employee%20Resources/CCF%20Policies%20%20Procedures/EVP/Procedures/Staff%20Safety%20and%20Security_PRO_GPG-ECP-088.doc
https://www.ccfhub.org/Employee%20Resources/CCF%20Policies%20%20Procedures/EVP/Policies/Staff%20Safety%20and%20Security_POL-GP-ECP-046.doc
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Should you or a member of your staff become a victim of sexual assault, recommended initial actions include:
ievans@childfund.org
The Personal Emergency Guide (PEG) is a standalone document that every staff person carries with him or her at all times when traveling. The PEG is a single sheet of paper, with information on both sides that can be folded and maintained in a passport, wallet or similar. It is a current list of all emergency numbers, contacts, a summary of SOPs, or other information the office wants to include that any given staff person or visitor might need in case of a safety or security incident.
Personal Emergency Guide (PEG)

Provide information on requirements and procedures that enable you to perform your job in a manner that safeguards you.

Develop understanding regarding your responsibilities for the protection of PEAR within your control.

Provide an understanding of security risks

Provide information on good practice to avoid or respond to negative security events.

Connect you to resources that provide additional information and/or support.
Goals of this Presentation:
Resources:
https://www.ccfhub.org/Groups/GlobalPrograms/SafetyAndSecurity/Pages/default.aspx
+ Denial or ignorance can severely limit a person's ability to recognize threats or to prevent/avoid them

+ The authorities can't be everywhere, so you must take responsibility for yourself.
If something feels wrong, it likely is. Take appropriate actions
Tuned out = unaware of surroundings
Relaxed awareness = paying attention but enjoying life
Focused awareness= carefully observing a potential danger
Higher alert= confirmed threat, action needed

you need to find a balance between the different levels of awareness. You can shift between them based on the situation/content that you are currently in.
Recognize threats exist
You are responsible for your own safety
Trust your Instincts
Levels of Awareness
Find a balance:
• Use hard, lockable luggage and label it so the name and address are not easily seen.
• When traveling, leave a planned itinerary with a responsible person.
• Inform the Safety and Security Focal Point, Security Manager or Director, Global Safety and Security of your travel plans as appropriate.
• Carry a list of emergency names, addresses, phone numbers, and the names of reputable hotels along the route.

• When appropriate, photocopy passport and other documents and carry only the copy, keeping a second copy at home or office (so that others can also access, if need in an emergency). When carrying the original, consider disguising it with a plain slip-on cover.
• Offices should provide a pre-arrival briefing and a copy of the Personal Emergency Guide.

• Carry a phone card to make emergency phone calls if required and be sure that your phone can make and receive international calls.
• In public areas or on local transport, sit near other people and hold all belongings (rather than placing them on the floor or a seat).
• Use caution when taking taxis in areas where cab drivers are known to be involved in criminal activity. When available, take licensed taxis and always settle on the fare before beginning the trip. Have the destination address written out in the local language to show the driver if necessary.
Always keep door locked
The NO should provide information on reputable taxi companies and advice on weather taxis can be safely used. This information should also be contained in the NO pre-arrival briefing
If this is a threat in the context, NO/RO security plans and the safety and security focal point will provide additional information
In the event of an emergency contact the Global Safety and Security Director
PEAR provides the GSST and security focal points with any observations/information that may help other travels stay safe
tarthur@childfund.org
On the Hub: https://www.ccfhub.org/Groups/GlobalPrograms/SafetyAndSecurity/Pages/default.aspx
Full transcript