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Say Mean Matter for Non-Language Arts

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by

Josh Brady

on 6 October 2015

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Transcript of Say Mean Matter for Non-Language Arts

Show—Literal description of what the political cartoonist, artist, or filmmaker is depicting or what is happening during the science experiment
Mean—What is the meaning of what we see?
Matter—What is the significance of that?
With Political Cartoons, Art, Videos, or Science Experiments
What the person actually says
SAY
Comprise 8 out of 62 multiple choice questions.
13% of the test.
“Evaluate the credibility of an author's argument…” is the most heavily tested reading standard on the test.
Usually tested by having them read social studies or science topics
These Two Standards
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions. (9th-10th)
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account. (11th-12th)
Science & Technical Reading Standards
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information. (9th-10th)
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole. (11th-12th)
History/Social Science Reading Standards
Teaching Informational Materials Using
Say Mean Matter
Say—Define the term
Mean—Paraphrase the definition into student friendly language.
Matter—Why does this matter? Why is this event or idea important in the history of the world/United States? Why do you need to learn this concept?

Federalism
Mitochondria
Prepositional Phrase
Pythagorean Theorem
With Key Terms
Find five key sentences in the text.

Say—Copy down the sentences.
Mean—Paraphrase the sentences into your own words.
Matter—Why did you pick this sentence? Why is it important?
Student-Centered Version
““Freeman and slave, patrician and plebeian, lord and serf, guildmaster and journeyman, in a word, oppressor and oppressed, stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight, a fight that each time ended, either in a revolutionary reconstitution of society at large, or in the common ruin of the contending classes.”—Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels

Say—Copy down the quote and the author.
Mean—What does the quote mean?
Matter—Why does this quote matter?
Teacher-Directed with Primary Sources
“Napoleon Bonaparte was quite a short man—just five feet three inches tall. However, he cast a long shadow over the history of modern times.”

Say—What does the textbook say?
Mean—What does the quote mean?
Matter—Why does this matter?
Teacher-Directed with the Textbook
Why does this quote matter? Write what the importance of the quote is. Give examples that prove this idea wrong or right. Explain your answer.
MATTER
What does the quote mean? Rewrite it in your own words.

(PARAPHRASE!!!)
MEAN
Extend ideas presented in primary or secondary sources through original analysis, evaluation, and elaboration.
Evaluate the credibility of an author's argument or defense of a claim by critiquing the relationship between generalizations and evidence, the comprehensiveness of evidence, and the way in which the author's intent affects the structure and tone of the text (e.g., in professional journals, editorials, political speeches, primary source material).
Current CAHSEE Standards
9th-10th
Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
11th-12th
Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Writing (Non-Language Arts)
They are your students, and they need to graduate from high school.
You have the materials at your finger tips.
Have you ever read a science textbook?
You can teach the skill and your content at the same time.
There is a strong alignment between the tested CAHSEE standards and the Common Core non-Language Arts literacy standards.
More Reasons to Help Students Pass English CAHSEE Outside of Language Arts
SAY MEAN MATTER
Clarification: This is a pre-writing exercise. It will help students practice the skills and isolate the information before (or in place of) writing an essay.
2nd step
Finished
3rd step
Turning
SAY MEAN MATTER
into Essay Paragraphs
Advanced Step
Start
Use a transitional word, phrase or sentence.
Introduce by providing context:
Source
Relevance
SAY with citation
MEAN (when necessary)
MATTER (1-2 Sentences)
Frequently, more advanced essays require multiple pieces of evidence to prove one idea:
Repeat the steps, beginning with a transition to the new SAY MEAN MATTER.
Add a concluding sentence tying evidence together.
This can also be done in another paragraph.
Word Problem Example
Andy has 72 pieces of candy and wants to distribute them evenly among his 24 classmates. How many pieces of candy should each person get?
Implicit vs. Explicit Language
Full transcript