Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Native Americans

OCR F966: Civil Rights in the USA
by

David Rawlings

on 7 September 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Native Americans

Add the following to your map:

1. Colour (in pencil) the traditional cultural homelands of the Native American people and label some nations as examples.
2. In black draw outlines of Native American reservations in 1865 and 1880.
3. Add a label for the Indian Removal Act, 1830; Gold Rush, 1849; Homesteads Act, 1862; Pacific Union Railroad, 1869; Sand Creek Massacre, 1864.
US Civil Rights: Native Americans
Last Days of a Proud People
1865-1900
1865-1992
Lessons
Exam Info.
Videos & Games
Exam Board Info.
http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-history-a-h106-h506/
Past Paper Questions:
June 2010
: ‘The actions of Native Americans themselves contributed nothing to the advancement of their civil rights in the period from 1865 to 1992.’ To what extent do you agree with this view?

June 2011
: ‘The policies of the Federal government failed to support the civil rights of Native Americans.’ To what extent do you agree with this view of the period from 1865 to 1992?

June 2012
: To what extent was the acquisition of US citizenship in 1924 the most important turning-point in the development of Native American civil rights in the period from 1865 to 1992?

Jan. 2013
: Assess the importance of the actions of Native Americans themselves in gaining greater civil rights in the period from 1865 to 1992.
Suggested Knowledge:
Native Americans:
their position in 1865; the impact of the Dawes Act 1887, of the acquisition of US citizenship 1924, of the New Deal, of the American Indian Movement in the 1960s and 1970s; Native Americans and the Supreme Court; Native American pressure groups.
This theme focuses on the struggle of citizens in the United States to gain equality before the law without regard to ethnic origin, gender or wealth. Candidates should understand the factors which encouraged and discouraged change during this period.

Candidates are not expected to demonstrate a detailed understanding of the specification content but are expected to know the main developments and turning points relevant to the theme.
60% of A2
30% of AS
Mark Scheme
Knowledge:
Accurate, wide ranging, relevant, lots of key terms.
Communication:
Fluent, well-structured, coherent, clear, legible.
Analysis:
Evaluation of cause, consequence, change, significance.
Synoptic - i.e. range of views
Developed explanations
Well evidenced judgements
40 marks
20 marks
YouTube Clips:
http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/games/fling/nativeamericans/
http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/games/walk/walk_west.html
Games:
Terms Game:
Spirit of the Frontier, by John Gast
To evaluate the hypothesis that Native American rights and freedoms were eroded in the last half of the 19th century.
Learning Objective:
C: Sound knowledge of factors that affected Native American rights in the 19th century. Judgements made without supporting evidence.
B: Very good knowledge used to explain significance of events and support judgements.
A: Excellent synoptic understanding. Analysis of cause, consequence and significance of key events.
Into the Melting Pot
1900-45
To evaluate whether government policies caused suffering to the Indians but did not succeed in breaking their tribal loyalties and resistance to assimilation.
Learning Objective:
C: Sound knowledge of factors that affected Native American rights in the 19th and 20th centuries. Judgements made without supporting evidence.
B: Very good knowledge used to explain significance of events and support judgements.
A: Excellent synoptic understanding. Analysis of cause, consequence and significance of key events.
To evaluate that urbanization further impoverished and degraded the vast majority of Native Americans but did not destroy their tribal loyalties.
Learning Objective:
C: Sound knowledge of factors that affected Native American rights in the 19th century. Judgements made without supporting evidence.
B: Very good knowledge used to explain significance of events and support judgements.
A: Excellent synoptic understanding. Analysis of cause, consequence and significance of key events.
To evaluate the hypothesis that in spite of protest nd opposition, Native Americans remained dependent on the fluctuating priorities of government policy and on the courts for the extension of their rights.
Learning Objective:
C: Sound knowledge of factors that affected Native American rights in the 19th century. Judgements made without supporting evidence.
B: Very good knowledge used to explain significance of events and support judgements.
A: Excellent synoptic understanding. Analysis of cause, consequence and significance of key events.
'Urban Indians'
1945-69
A People Apart?
1970-92
Who are the Native Americans?
“A Native American elder once described his own inner struggles in this manner:

Inside of me there are two dogs.
One of the dogs is mean and evil.
The other dog is good.
The mean dog fights the good dog all the time.

When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied, The one I feed the most."
Quote of the Day
In 1865 the Native American peoples were made up of 86 nations.
What is a nation?
Task: Map Work
Final Thought
How free were Native Americans in 1865?
How had their freedom changed by 1900?
'Manifest Destiny'
How successful was reservation policy?
Notes on the Dawes Act, 1887, pp.175-8.
What were its aims?
How far did it achieve those aims?
What were the consequences for Native American peoples?
Homework:
Task: Card-sort
Sort the cards into successes or failures of reservation policy in the 19th century.
How damaging was the Dawes Act?
Henry Dawes:
'... to be civilised is to wear civilised clothes... cultivate the ground, live in houses, ride in Studebaker wagons, send children to school, drink whiskey [and] own property.'
Do you agree?
Terms of the Dawes Act:
Reservations to be divided up into homesteads;
Each Head of a family to receive 160 acres or farmland or 320 acres of grazing land for 25 years;
After 25 years Native Americans to take full ownership of the land;
Unallotted land on the reservation to be given to white settlers.
What is the purpose of this act?
How beneficial is this for Native Americans?
USA
or
Native-American?
Interpretations:
'There is no doubt that Native Americans suffered enormously at the hands of white Americans, but federal Indian policy was shaped as much by paternalism, however misguided, as by white greed.'

Andrew Boxer, HistoryToday
'The reservation system proved a disaster for the Indians as the government failed to keep its promises. The nomadic tribes were unable to follow the buffalo, and conflict among the tribes increased, rather than decreased, as the tribes competed with each other for dwindling resources.'

NebraskaStudies.org
Was US policy towards Native Americans justified?
Opinion Line
YES
NO
Terms Game
Timeline: Native Americans, 1865-1900
June 2011:
‘The policies of the Federal government failed to support the civil rights of Native Americans.’ To what extent do you agree with this view of the period from 1865 to 1992?
Native Americans, 1865-1992
Events:
Union Pacific Railroad, 1865
Indian Appropriation Act, 1871
Battle of Little Bighorn, 1876
Dawes Act, 1887
Massacre at Wounded Knee, 1890
Reservation Policy
Americanization
Manifest Destiny
Add and explain these on your timeline!
Was Native American resistance to assimilation a help or hindrance?
Annotation task:
Success Criteria:

Bronze: Identify which were actions of NAs or actions of the Federal Government. Identify the pressure groups.
Silver: Explain key turning points.
Gold: Assess whether each was a help / hindrance for NAs.
Platinum: Assess the significance of each point.
How far did government policies up to 1945 cause suffering to Native Americans?
Opinion Line
YES
NO
How successful were government policies at breaking resistance to assimilation?
Opinion Line
YES
NO
How successful were Native Americans 'Americanised' in the first half of the twentieth century?
Timeline: Native Americans, 1900-1945
June 2008:
‘The concept of the Melting Pot did not apply to Native Americans throughout the period 1865-1992. How far do you agree with this statement?
Native Americans, 1865-1992
Key Terms & Events:
The Melting Pot
Society of American Indians, 1911
AIDA, 1923
Indian Citizenship Act, 1924
The Meriam Report
The Indian Re-organisation Act (Indian New Deal)
WW2 for Native Americans
National Congress of American Indians
Add and explain these on your timeline!
How far was the NCAI a turning point for Native Americans?
Annotation task:
Success Criteria:

Bronze: Identify which were actions of NAs or actions of the Federal Government. Identify the pressure groups.
Silver: Explain key turning points.
Gold: Assess whether each was a help / hindrance for NAs.
Platinum: Assess the significance of each point.
Timeline: Native Americans, 1945-79
June 2010
: ‘The actions of Native Americans themselves contributed nothing to the advancement of their civil rights in the period from 1865 to 1992.’ To what extent do you agree with this view?
Native Americans, 1865-1992
Key Terms & Events:
Indian Claims Commission
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Indian Vocational Training Act, 1956
Impact of urbanisation
National Indian Youth Council
Militancy and 'Red Power'
Add and explain these on your timeline!
Heads and Tails: Match these NA tribes to the descriptions.
Sioux (aka. Lakota)
Navajo
Pueblo
Black Foot
Plains Indians from the black hills, won $3.4billion in compensation from federal gov. in 2009.
South-West, desert Indians, adapted well to farming in 19thC, assimilated better than most.
Plains Indians - mid-West America, hunted buffalo, resisted assimilation in the 19thC.
South-West, desert Indians, very deprived, 77% unemployment by 1968.
AIM and Red Power:
Success Criteria:

Bronze: Describe what happened with each event.
Silver: Explain how these impacted on the federal government.
Gold: How successful was the American Indian Movement?
Full transcript