Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Nancy Schlossberg's Theory of Transitions

No description
by

Stephanie Malmberg

on 9 October 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Nancy Schlossberg's Theory of Transitions

Nancy Schlossberg's Theory of Transitions
The Theory:
The 4 S's
This theory of transition provides four vital factors that help individuals cope with the process of transition.
First Generation Students
First-generation status appears to be a disadvantage throughout post secondary education that is independent of other background and enrollment factors" (Choy, 2001, p. 25). Low income and first generation college student retention and graduation rates are lower than the rest of the student body, while enrollment of these students is increasing.

Schlossberg's Theory of Transitions can be adapted to apply to low income and first generation students, addressing issues that may arise as they acclimate to college life.

For example, going to college can be
an anticipated transition, falling in love and getting married while in college can be unanticipated. Nonevents are transitions that were anticipated but did not occur (Chickering & Schlossberg, 1995).

Supporting low income and first generation college students in their transition into higher education is done through bridge programming and summer orientation programs geared toward the specific needs of this demographic.
Situation
Trigger
Timing
Control
Role Change
Duration
Previous Experience with a Similar Transition
Concurrent Stress
Assessment
Self
Personal and demographic characteristics
Support
intimate relationships
family units
networks of friends
institutions and communities

affect
affirmation
aid
honest feedback

stable
role dependent
changing
Strategies
Some modify the situation
Some control the meaning of the problem
Others aid in managing the stress
Dr. Nancy Schlossberg’s Theory of Transition (1984) is a psychosocial model of development that examines life events which affect various aspects of an individual’s life and their societal roles.

Student Affairs Implications
Veteran Students
Advising
Residential Life
Orientation Programs


Definition of Transition:
“Any event, or non-event, that results in changed relationships, routines, assumptions and roles.”
(Schlossberg, 1984)

The person’s perception of the transition is as important to understanding how a person is affected by the changing life events such as the type, context and impact of the transition.
Primary goal-
operationalizing variability

Types of Transitions:
Events
Anticipated
Unanticipated
Non-events
Personal
Ripple
Resultant
Delayed

References
Situation
Self
Support
Strategies
Choy, S. (2001). Students whose parents did not go to college: Postsecondary access, persistence, and attainment. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.

Cox, J.A. (2003, December). Teaching coping skills to first-year college students on academic probation. Academic Advising Today. 36 (4).

Evans, N.J., Forney, D.S., Guido, F.M., Patton, L.D., & Renn, K.A. (2010). Student development in college: Theory and practice (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass.

Josey-Pizzolato, J.E. (2004). Coping with conflict: Self-authorship, coping, and adaptation to college in first-year, high-risk students. Journal of College Student Development, 45(4), 425-442.

Tovar, E. & Simon, M. (2006). Academic probation as a dangerous opportunity: factors influencing diverse college students' success. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 30, 547-564.


Psychological resources
TYPES:
FUNCTIONS:
MEASUREMENTS:
Information seeking
Direct action
Inhibition of action
Intrapsychic behavior
4 Coping Modes:
3 Coping Responses:
Socio-economic status
Gender
Age (psychological not chronological
State of life and health
Ethnicity/Culture
Ego development
Outlook in optimism and self-efficacy
Commitment & Values
Spirituality
Resiliency
Holistic or
Developmental Advising
Developmental Advising is a student-centered approach toward developing a relationship among students, faculty and other college professionals.


Developmental Advising is an ongoing growth process which assists students in the exploration, clarification, communication, and implementation of realistic choices based on self-awareness of abilities, interests, and values.
Moving In, Moving Through, and Moving Out
Full transcript