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T.S. Eliot

About T.S. Eliot and his famous poem: "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"
by

Hollie Trigg

on 7 March 2013

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Transcript of T.S. Eliot

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Thomas Sterns Eliot British/American Literary Period
of
The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock The Modern Era: 1901-1950 British Period
The Modern Era: 1940-Present United States Period Written By: T.S. Eliot & Read By: T.S. Eliot Dramatic Monologue A literary, usually verse composition in which a speaker reveals his or her character, often in relation to a critical situation or event, in a monologue addressed to the reader or to a presumed listener.
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dramatic+monologue Theme Figurative Language Rhyme Scheme(s) Imagery WORKS CITED: Discussion Questions: 1. Why do you think Prufrock is so afraid of going for what he wants in life? 2. In the end, do you believe it's fair for Prufrock to feel the need to punish himself for wasting his life away?
(Do you think he truly wasted his life in the first place?) -Born September 1888 and passed away in January 1965.
-Youngest of seven children.
-Started Harvard at age 18 in the fall of 1906.
-Two years into his schooling, he found a book called: Arthur Symons's The Symbolist Movement in Literature (1895). This is what first inspired him to be a writer.
(http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/eliot/life.htm)
Other Inspirations
-Ezra Pound: Met, upon moving to England
-Bertrand Russell: Former Harvard Professor
-Vivian Haigh-Wood: His wife. Met through Ezra Pound
All helped Eliot with his career and played important roles in Eliot's legacy. (http://www.csustan.edu/english/reuben/pal/chap7/eliot.html)
-The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock was of his most famous poems
-First published in Poetry Magazine in June of 1915.
(http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/toc/33). (http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/toc/33). http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/eliot/life.htm http://www.csustan.edu/english/reuben/pal/chap7/eliot.html Facts About the Brit/US Modern Era's: In the Modern Era's of both America and Britain, traditional values and morals were becoming distant and were strayed away from.
"Free Verse: Poetry", "Stream of Consciousness", "Magic Realism", and writing in "Present Tense" Became popular in both countries and can be found in this poem.
World Wars 1&2 were fought and both sides took very heavy casualties.
Information From:
Literary Periods of Brit. Lit. Handout
http://www.uta.edu/english/wbfaris/MagicalRealism.html
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-free-verse.htm#did-you-know
Allen, Janet, and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Holt McDougal Literature, Texas British Literature: Beowulf. Virginia: Holt McDougal, 2010. Print. Literary Periods of Brit. Lit. Handout
http://www.uta.edu/english/wbfaris/MagicalRealism.html
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-free-verse.htm#did-you-know
Allen, Janet, and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Holt McDougal Literature, Texas British Literature: Beowulf. Virginia: Holt McDougal, 2010. Print. Narrated by one person: Spoken Directly to the reader
(Line 1) "LET us go, you and I"
Speaks of his fear or ineligibility to go after what he wants in life or the girl he loves. (Lines 47-50)
"Do I dare
Do I dare disturb the Universe?
In a minute there is time.
For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse."
Lines (89-95)
"And it would have been worth it, after all,
After the cups and marmalade, the tea,
Among the porcelain, among some talk of you and me,
Would it have been worth while
To have bitten off the matter with a smile
To have squeezed the Universe into a ball" The poem starts out explaining a lonely town like setting with things like "Half deserted streets" (4), "One-night cheap hotels" (6) and "Sawdust restaurants" (7). "In the room women come and go Talking of Michelangelo" (13-14), which could resemble a museum and the things of the past. Metaphorically speaking, the narrator is speaking of his own loneliness and dwellings on the past.
He speaks of feeling trapped from where he is and where he would like to be: "Like a patient etherized upon a table" (3).
He speaks of how he should have taken action when he had the chance, but has now wasted to much of his life. He feels should he dare enjoy life now? Is it too late after all he has thrown away?
"I grow old... I grow old..."(122) Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare eat a peach?" (124)
He decides sadly, that it is just too late. Thus ending the poem on a tragic note with tragic imagery.
"I have heard the mermaids singing each to each. I do not thing they will sing to me." (126-127) "We have lingered in the chambers of the sea
By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown
Till human voices wake us and we drown." (131-133)
He is saying, he just lingered on through life, missed out on the girl and other things and he might have wanted in life and therefore drowning is human voices. His own, and probably others saying they told him so. Love: There is a woman that he loves, but feels unable to go after her. He speaks of his love for her, but doesn't do anything about it.
"Magic" Realism: This poem is like reality within a dream. The narrator speaks of what could have been and what should have been like being in a day dream the comes back around to earth and the truth of it all.
Realism: The reality that his life is not how he wants it to be, like in his dreams.
Beauty: Life itself is the beauty in this poem.
-However it all reverts back to realism and magic realism. He dreams of having wonderful, beautiful, life, but that's all he does is dream.
Idealism: He speaks of it but never pursues idealism. Only dreams about it. Meter and Rhythm The language that communicates ideas beyond literal meaning or words. It can make descriptions and unfamiliar or difficult ideas easier to understand. Special Figurative Language Types and Examples: -Simile: Line (8)
"Streets that follow like a tedious argument."
-Personification: Lines (15-16)
"The yellow fog that rubs it's back upon the window panes
The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the window-panes
Licked it's tongue on the corners of the evening."
-Apostrophe (Lines 61-63)
"How then should I begin?
To spit out all of the butt-ends of my days and ways?
And how should I presume? Commentary #1: Commentary #2: There are several different schemes.
Ballads: Found in almost all stanzas of the poem.
Quatrains:Found in almost all stanzas of the poem.
Couplets:(Lines 13-14&37-38(same) 122-123)
Spenserian Stanza:(Lines 113-121(Shakespeare's Hamlet))
Allen, Janet, and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Holt McDougal Literature, Texas British Literature: Beowulf. Virginia: Holt McDougal, 2010. Print. This poem consists of a variety of meters and rhythms such as iambic parameters, trochaic meters and so on. Eliot was testing many of them out on this poem.
http://synique.iwarp.com/scaeva/prufrock.htm http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/english/English151W-03/prufrock.htm
from Kathleen McCoy's and Judith Harlan's ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM 1785 (New York: HarperCollins, 1992: 265-66) In this commentary, the Author speaks of Prufrock as a "Pathetic figure", One who saw himself as a weak person and unworthy of being called a "tragic hero". They also speak of him as someone who is talks about doing things and life but then saying "There will be time" and therefore "puts" things "off" thinking he will have time to do them later.
They speak of how dreary the neighborhood is that is mentioned on the poem and says that that reflects on Prufrocks life and actions. From Poets of Reality: Six Twentieth-Century Writers. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard UP, 1965.
http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/eliot/prufrock.htm In this commentary by J. Hillis Miller,
Miller speaks of Prufrock's life as something that can't be "understood" by others. He says that Prufrock is in his own little "bubble" or "sphere" that no one else can enter or hope to understand. This then puts him in isolation. Because he is in his "sphere" not even the girl he loves can understand him and time slips away. http://synique.iwarp.com/scaeva/prufrock.htm http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/english/English151W-03/prufrock.htm From Poets of Reality: Six Twentieth-Century Writers. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard UP, 1965.
http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/eliot/prufrock.htm http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/english/English151W-03/prufrock.htm
from Kathleen McCoy's and Judith Harlan's ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM 1785 (New York: HarperCollins, 1992: 265-66) PREZInted to you by: Hollie Leanne Trigg! :D Mrs. Henckel
English 4
Started:
21 February 2013
Finished:
4 March 2013 I hope you enjoy it! :D
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