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English Puritans

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Hunter DuBroc

on 1 October 2012

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Transcript of English Puritans

The Salem Witch Trials By Hunter, Chelsea, Macy, and Andy Political figures greatly influenced the public"s opinion about witchcraft.

Most politicians were also religious leaders so their beliefs were pressed upon the citizens so as to ensure that witches were captured and executed.

It was easy to be accused of being a witch. Someone would go to their local magistrate and complain, if their complaint was credible the accused would be arrested and put on trial. How did politics affect the Salem witch trails of 1692 Politics also controlled who was executed. They would use their governmental powers to accused people they didn't like or who they ounce fought with.

They would also try to disbanded any accusations that were made against a friend or relative to further their statues in government. By: Hunter DuBroc Bibliography:
Adams, G. (2009), The Specter of Salem: Remembering the Witch Trials in Nineteenth-Century America, University of Chicago Press

Jackson, Shirley (1956), The Witchcraft of Salem Village, Random House What was happening to the community?

Children in Salem began exhibiting bizarre behavior (speaking in gibberish, complaining of pain, crawling under chairs and tables). Doctors blamed witchcraft for their strange behaviors. Why were women being accused more of being witches? Who were the women?

There is no specific reason why women are suspected more of witchcraft than men, but most are superstitious. If a woman's husband died, she came into money, spoke to herself, or even simply had a black dog, she was accused of being a witch.
Sarah Good, Susannah Hartin, Sarah Wildes, Martha Carrier, Sarah Osborn, Alice Parker, and Mary Parker are only a few innocent women that were accused and punished because they were witches. Who were the people in the community that began the accusations?

Colton Mather, Abigail Williams, Elizabeth Parris, and Ann Putnam, Jr. By: Chelsea Duhon

Bibliography
Linder, Douglas. "The Witchcraft Trials in Salem: A commentary" Salem Witchcraft Trials of 1692. 28 September, 2012.
Blumberg, Jess. "A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials" Smithsonian. com. 28 September, 2012. Witches were feared because people, especially the religious Puritans, believed them to be outlets for Lucifer's will; a witch hunter (a person who hunted witches as a profession) could 'identify' a witch by stabbing them in certain places, such as a birthmark or scar. If the person did not bleed, they were a witch. Why were witches feared and how could a witch be "identified'? Convicted witches were mainly hanged; however, a few were executed in a strange way: they would throw a 'witch' into a lake after putting weights on her. If she floated, she was a witch; if she sunk and drowned, she was innocent. How were convicted witches punished? by Andy Hillman
Bibliography
Sutter. Tim, "Salem Witchcraft", Siteclopedia,
2003
Jones, Ty. "Salem Witchhunts", Oracle Education Foundation,
1997 By Andy Hillman The farming was tough because of the harsh climate and the rough rock terrain. What was happening in the Salem Witch Trial environment? Salem Witch Trial, The World Behind the Hysteria. Discovery Education, 2012. Web. 28 September 2012. The weather had an extreme cold spell that lasted from 1680 and 1700, they had called it a little ice age.

Yes they did get sick from the Rye that they grew from the grain of crops. It had fungus which caused many people to get sick. How was the weather and did they get sick? Did Cold Weather Cause the Salem Witch Trials. LifesLittleMysteries.com, 2012. Web. September 28 2012. Alan, Bellows. Bad Rye and the Salem Witches. damninteresting.com. 2012. Web. September 28 2012.
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