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Writing 2.0: Why Your Students Should be Writing, Drafting, Revising, and Reflecting Every Week

Web tools combined with writing to learn in the disciplines offer many ways to add dynamic writing assignments to any course or to improve upon the traditional graded essay.
by

Robert Baird

on 9 June 2017

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Transcript of Writing 2.0: Why Your Students Should be Writing, Drafting, Revising, and Reflecting Every Week

Writing 2.0: Why Your Students Should be Writing, Drafting, Revising, and Reflecting Every Week
(and you don't have to grade everything!)

Quick Write:

What did you dislike about writing assignments when you were a student?

Did you ever do any writing for school that you felt was worthwhile or enjoyable?
30+ year old movement in K-12 and higher ed

Emphasizes the centrality of writing in teaching and learning

Believes writing is an iterative, never complete finished process

Encourages writing exercises and assignments in all disciplines

Promotes the idea that students should write to learn as well as learn to write
Frequent writing in all disciplines helps students better comprehend, retain, synthesize, and evaluate the subject matter. In addition, learning to write according to disciplinary protocols not only helps students understand specialized texts, but allows them to begin to participate in an academic discourse community.
"Writing as a Mode of Learning"
Writing requires representing knowledge symbolically
Writing is integrative
Writing requires systematic connections and relationships
Writing is same pace as learning—self-pacing
Writing provides feedback—long term and short term
Writing is participatory

in College Composition and Communication, 1977
Discipline-specific knowledge is shared through written texts with particular styles, conventions, and jargon.

The rules and practices of discipline specific writing are rarely written and are generally transmitted through apprenticeship.
Graphic Novel Style with Comic Life
WAC is perfect for Web-Based Writing Tools

Blogs, wikis, Facebook, Twitter facilitate quick, short, and community-based writing with limited management from the instructor

The informality and immediacy lends itself to quick exploratory writing and personal expression
Start Here!
By moving away from formal, graded essays with no audience, instructors can leverage the social nature of web-based writing and change the relationship of the student to their text, emphasizing

An authentic audience
A Community of peers
Personal discovery
Original inquiry and exploration
http://go.illinois.edu/quickwrite
Center for Writing Studies @ Illinois
Writing Across the Curriculum
Why Write?
Disciplines as
Discourse Communities
WAC Meets Web 2.0
Writing @ Illinois
http://pactlab-dev.spcomm.uiuc.edu/classes/08SP/280blogs/
Christian Sandvig's
Student Blogs


Web tools combined with writing to learn in the disciplines offer many ways to add dynamic writing assignments to any course or to improve upon the traditional graded essay.
The Kuleshov Effect in Cinema
Students will engage in a comprehensive exploration of creative inquiry, self-reflection, social engagement, and media production. They will adapt the basic, traditional principles of critical writing and analysis, to communicate effectively using image production and post-production. Directed writings in concert with video production projects will allow students to experience an integrated process of thinking, creating, and problem-solving.
ART 350   Writing with Video
Writing to Learn
"Generally, writing-to-learn activities are short, impromptu or otherwise informal writing tasks that help students think through key concepts or ideas presented in a course. Often, these writing tasks are limited to less than five minutes of class time or are assigned as brief, out-of-class assignments."
The WAC Clearing House:
https://wac.colostate.edu/intro/pop2d.cfm
Writing assignments of this sort are designed to introduce or give students practice with the language conventions of a discipline as well as with specific formats typical of a given discipline. For example, the engineering lab report includes much different information in a quite different format from the annual business report.
Writing in the Disciplines
The WAC Clearing House
https://wac.colostate.edu/intro/pop2e.cfm
Writing Across Media
http://www.cws.illinois.edu/wam/
In this course, students will explore the intersections of various media: print, film, images, sound, etc. Students will consider the ways in which writing--as an object and as a practice--is shaped by multimodal interactions. Also integrates practical activities with broader theoretical issues in order to provide effective strategies for designing multimedia presentations, projects, and texts that integrate photography, video, and sound.
http://plasq.com/apps/comiclife/macwin/
Janet Emig
The Value Proposition
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